Hans A. Kure – from the Bill Reaves files 1889-1899

Federal Point Chronology 1725 – 1994

Hans A. Kure

Hans A. Kure

The first mention of Hans Kure in the Bill Reaves Files is in the Wilmington Messenger on April 16, 1889. H. A. Kure is “offering the Carolina Beach Club House and furniture for rent for the season.” Later that year, (Messenger, August 10, 1889) the  reports that he is building a “pretty cottage at Carolina Beach.”

In June of 1890 we find this wonderful account of a bear hunt: “A bear hunt was organized at Carolina Beach with thirty men and a pack of good trained dogs taking part in the campaign against Bruin.”

The leader of the group was Mr. George L. Morton. The bear was first seen on June 22nd by Mr. Hans A. Kure, about 1 1/2 miles below Carolina Beach. On the 25th a party was organized by Mr. Morton and went in search of the game. They found the bear, a big black fellow, about 10 p.m., near the surf some two miles below Carolina Beach. They got two or three shots at him before he escaped into the woods.”

A year later, (Wilmington Star, May 21, 1891) reported on an interesting fishing trip: “Messrs. Hans A. Kure, G. Smith, and Charlie Williams went over on the wreck of the old blockade runner BEAUREGARD and caught seventy-five fine fish in about thirty minutes. In the lot was a sheepshead that weighed fifteen pounds. This big fish was baked and made a meal for nine persons.”

The next month this advertisement runs in the (Wilmington Messenger, June 9, 1891): “Hans A. Kure has erected a building at Carolina Beach for amusements, which included a first class bowling alley, billiard and pool tables. The building also included a No.1 family grocery store. Oranges, lemons, bananas, and other fruits always on hand. A full assortment of canned goods. Ice available in any quantity.”

In August of the same year this delightful little note appears in the (Weekly Star, August 7, 1891): “Mr. H. A. Kure was ordered exempt from tax on pool table and bowling alley at Carolina Beach, on petition of residents of that place.”

By the next month (Aug 25, 1891) the business is in full swing. “A ten-pin tournament was given at Carolina Beach by Mr. Hans A. Kure. The first day was for the ladies and the next day for the men. Handsome prizes were given, which had previously been exhibited at Dinglehoef’s jewelry store in Wilmington. Perfect order was observed at the alleys during the tournament.”

What was this all about? “December 21, 1891. The Board of County Commissioners ordered that the valuation of the property of Hans A. Kure, in Federal Point Township, be reduced from $2,000 to $1,000, and his personal property from $2635 to $1,350.”  (Wilm. Messenger, 12-22-1891).

Business was clearly prospering for by summer of 1892 this note appears in the (Wilm. Messenger, August 1, 1892): “Hans A. Kure made application for a retail liquor license at Carolina Beach, which was granted.”

In August 1893 a major hurricane hit the beaches. This note appeared after the storm. ”A number of residents of Carolina Beach published a resolution in the Wilmington Messenger newspaper about the gallant and efficient Hans A. Kure.” It read in part as follows: “Before the storm had burst in all its fury, Mr. Hans A. Kure visited the beach, and, going from cottage to cottage, tendered to the inhabitants the hospitality of his residence situated a short distance from the beach. In the midst of impending danger, while the billows were lashing the beach and encircling many of the cottages.

Mr. Kure, with the assistance of a number of white fishermen, by Herculean effort, rescued the valuables from the threatened cottages and transported them to a point of safety. His ministration to the needs and comfort of many who sought shelter at his residence elicited the highest praise. To him is justly due and cordially tendered the heartfelt gratitude of all.” (Wilm. Messenger, 9-3-1893)

The year 1893 must have been one of those years! In October another, even more destructive storm blasted the area. “During the terrible hurricane very minor damage was done to the buildings, bath houses or residences on Carolina Beach, with the exception of fences, which were generally blown down or washed away.

A few of the residences had their doors forced open and some panes of glass were blown in. The only damage of consequence was to the railroad track which had been badly washed at several points between the beach and the river. The pier leading out into the river was, however, all gone, except the pilings; the entire superstructure with ties and rails, having been washed away. The storm raged with great fury at “The Rocks.” Six small cottages were demolished and swept away, the wharf being destroyed, and much damage was done to the fishing boats and nets. Mr. Hans A. Kure lost seines, nets, boats, and other articles belonging to his fishery.” (Wilm. Star, 10-15-1893).

As always the residents of the beaches were resilient. Two years after the horrible hurricane year the Kure‟s were back in business: “Mr. and Mrs. Hans A. Kure were now to be found at their ‘Big Cottage on the Beach,’ with a first-class boarding house at Carolina Beach. Meals and lunch could be had at all hours. Rooms were for rent, furnished or unfurnished, by day, week or season. Mr. Kure was to have charge of the Carolina Beach Club, about two squares from the Cottage.” (Wilm. Star, 6-2-1895 – advertisement)

One can imagine just how much work went into the Kure’s summer enterprises. (Wilm. Star, July 4, 1895) A large number of people visited Carolina Beach and spent a quiet, pleasant day. There was music for dancing all day, which was taken advantage of by a large number. Several fishing parties went out in the afternoon. The surf bathers were on hand in large numbers. Mrs. Mayo and Mrs. Kure had all they could do serving guests with sea delicacies. The last boat to Wilmington returned at 9:30 p.m. and the ride on the river was delightful.”

Two years later (Wilmington Messenger, May 16, 1897) the following advertisement appeared: “H. A. Kure, manager, announced that the Carolina Beach Pleasure Club was now open for the accommodation of members. The management was to spare no pains to make this season the most enjoyable of the club. Ladies and gentlemen friends were cordially invited to come down and try their hand at Ten Pins and Billiards and Pool.” And again on June 8. 1897 “A license was granted to Hans A. Kure for the sale of spirituous liquors at Carolina Beach.”

In the late 1890’s the beaches must have been a major storm cycle. This Nor’easter hit the beaches in April, 1898 (Wilmington Dispatch): “One of the worse days experienced in a long time occurred today. It was cold and the wind blew fiercely all day. The Cape Fear River was lashed into a fury; Mr. T.F. Tyler reported that the occupants of a house at Carolina Beach sat up all night in the fear that the building would be blown down. It weathered the storm all right, though.

And so did Sedgeley Hall Club house which had excellent foundations. Some of the telegraph lines were in distress until long after noon.” (Wilm. Weekly Star, 4-29-1898). “The wind blew big guns and hail fell in abundance. A cottage on the beach, the property of Mr. Hans A. Kure, was blown from its foundation and wrecked. It was not occupied. It was a total loss.”

This poignant note brings the century to a close: (September 16, 1898) “All the cottagers who had summered at Carolina Beach had moved back to the city and consequently the beach closed down today. There were no city people on the beach, even Mr. Hans A. Kure had gone. The steamer WILMINGTON ceased stopping at Carolina Beach. She now only made daily trips from Wilmington to Southport.” (The Semi Weekly Messenger, 9-16-1898).

 

Kure Beach Progressive Association – Notes from 1946

Historic Feature — Kure Beach Progressive Association
By Ann Hertzler

[From a notebook from the 1940s at the KB town hall details work of the Kure Beach Progressive Association.]

A meeting of the citizens of Kure Beach was held in the Kure Memorial Chapel Monday night, Dec 31, 1945 with 16 present. Mr. Weinburg, acting chairman, explained that the purpose of the meeting was to discuss ways and means of securing fire protection, as the only security now is the insurance carried…. Mr. L.C.Kure would furnish the water and fittings; decided that we purchase 500‟ of hose. Property owners were contacted and informed of actions. ($200 pledged, $115 paid)

Jan 8, 1946  “Kure Beach Progressive Association”
Chairman Mr. L. E.Wienburg
Secy Mrs. C B Fry
Treas Mr. L. C. Kure
Advisory Committee. – Bob Ford, L. C. Kure, FM Steinfurth
Other Committees elected: By-Laws, Auditing, Financial, Maintenance Mr. Kure reported the hose is expected next week. Cost $284.50

Jan 15, 1946 – Mr. Kure made a trip to Fayetteville to look at a fire truck; not successful. Mr. Manning reported a ford truck has been sent to Camp Davis for sale.

Jan 22, 1946 – A motion was made to photograph the ponds of water and take before the County Commissioners in regards to sanitary conditions in and around Kure Beach ….

Jan 29, 1946 – 5th meeting
Photographs of the ponds, ditches and other places of stagnation has been made by Mrs. Weinburg; to be taken to County Commissioners, … along with as many members as possible, especially the ladies, and ….a signed petition.

Feb 5, 1946 – Ways and Means Comm: Mrs. Hewitt, Chr, plans of suppers, dances, shows, Bingo, etc. but the question is where these events are to be given considering meetings are now being held in the Chapel. Mr. Weinburg offers his new building for quick use; Mr. Kure offers his building next to Mr. Flowers Store… Suggestions to secure Brakers Hall dance room for the dances. Two turkeys to be donated by Mr. Flowers and Mr. Kure for a turkey supper.
Col. Pool asked about trash disposal. Mrs. Weinburg volunteered to survey residents willing to pay to haul away all garbage.

Feb 12, 1946 – Mesars Kure, Hers? And Ford went to Ft Fisher to see about a Fire Truck – found a building for $50 that can be demounted and moved; and put on a lot donated by Mr. Kure to house the fire truck and other equipment.
Proposal for street lighting explained in detail; and the fire alarm system. (a strong siren and other fire alarms.)

Feb 19, 1946 – The turkey supper will be held at Jim‟s Café Saturday night the 23, at $1.00/ plate.

March 5, 1946 Mr. Pinkston is trying to secure safety Highway signs to be posted at the intersection.

March 12, 1946 – Mr. King reports that at present time the fire truck is being housed in the McManus Garage. As this is to small he suggests the pipe etc be moved from the pump house to take care of truck.
Mr. King reports no sirene on truck and suggests we look into this.
Meeting of the Home Demonstration Club will be held at Mrs. Tanners Wed. afternoon. Mr. OBrien announced a Benefit supper for the Chapel will be given Friday

March 19, 1946 – The siren in Wilmington was not acceptable; agreed to order a streamline flasher type for $16.02.

March 26, 1946 – Specine Committee: called on Dr. Elliott and he gave assurance of full cooperation and with authority from Sheriff Jones. He appointed Chief Pinkston on the health force for our Territory…

April 2, 1936 – Mr Kure reports that the Tide Water Power Co had approved our proposal but are unable to furnish the necessary supplies at the present time. Mr. Kure states that if we will join him in setting the poles he will furnish the wire and power for temporary lights – to be discussed.

April 16, 1946 – Mr. A Nichols, City Mgn of Wilmington offers to sell the fire truck we now have for $1250.
Mr. King reports lights on Avenue K now complete.
Mrs. Tavis reports a Turkey Supper will be given April 27 at the Sea Gull restaurant.

June 25, 1946 – Mr. Flowers: proposed constitution and By Laws; held for study till the next meeting. (passed Aug 13)
The city manage will accept $1000 for the truck, a cash payment of $600 and $400 to be paid. Mr. Kure reports that the drainage proposal has been accepted (proposal not included).

 

Monthly Meeting – Nov. 2009 – ‘The Kure Family Legacy ‘

November Meeting – Monday November 16, 2009

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, November 16 at 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Ellen Kure

Ellen Kure

 

Hans A. Kure

Hans A. Kure

Our program this month will be a showing a section of the video The Kure Family Legacy made in 1991, produced by the Kure Family. Featured in the narration are A.E. “Punky” Kure, Pat Robertson Rice, Mike Robertson and the late Jennie Kure Robertson Bagley.

The story concentrates on the early years from Hans Anderson Kure and his wife Ellen‟s immigration to America and the establishment of their family in Wilmington.

Hans was a ship’s chandler and owner of numerous warehouses and steamers in the early 1890s, when Wilmington was a large and prosperous port. We learn about the first generation, William, Hans, Lawrence, Andrew, and Elene.

Invited to join us for the evening are “Punky” Kure, Mike Robertson, and Pat Rice who will answer questions and lead a discussion on the history of the Kure Family.

The program is in memory of Jennie Bagley, who passed away in September. She was a charter member of Kure Lutheran Memorial Church, and worked at UNC-Wilmington and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Her memories provide a fascinating peek at the early years of the development of Fort Fisher Seabeach, and the Kure Beach pier.

 


Monthly Meeting Report for November, 2009 – Published in the December, 2009 Newsletter

Over 50 people enjoyed a segment of the The Kure Family Legacy DVD. The segment covered the very early years of Hans and Ellen Kure’s lives and how they came to America and to the North Carolina Coast.

They must have been truly amazing people. Ellen Kure went from being a lady-in-waiting to the Royal Court in Denmark to raising a family and helping her husband build up his business in the primitive conditions of Kure Beach and the more civilized conditions of Wilmington (Most years they spent summers at the beach and winters in Wilmington) before the turn to the twentieth century.

I just love this note in the Bill Reaves files:

“July 4, 1895 FEDERAL POINT. A large number of people visited Carolina Beach and spent a quiet, pleasant day. There was music for dancing all day, which was taken advantage of by a large number. Several fishing parties went out in the afternoon. The surf bathers were on hand in large numbers. Mrs. Mayo and Mrs. Kure had all they could do serving guests with sea delicacies. The last boat to Wilmington returned at 9:30 p.m. and the ride on the river was delightful. WILM.STAR, 7-6-1895.”

A huge thanks to “Punky” Kure, Pat Rice, and “Curly” Shands for answering questions and adding comentary at the end of the film.