Snow’s Cut Bridge – From the Bill Reaves Files

snows_cut-steelJuly 4, 1929
Bids for construction of a temporary bridge over the Inland Waterway, at the point were it crosses the Carolina Beach highway, at an estimated cost of $10,000 was asked for and was to be opened in the office of the Wilmington District engineer.The temporary span would be constructed for traffic over the 75-foot ditch. It was announced also that bid for a permanent bridge over the canal at this point, were asked for and the bids were to be opened by the district engineer of July 25th. This structure was to cost approx. $100,000. WILM.STAR, 7-4-1929

December 14, 1929
Bids for the erection of a steel bridge on the Carolina Beach highway at the point of intersection of the Intra-Coastal Waterway, now under construction, were to be opened today in the Wilmington office of the North Carolina District of Army Engineers. This was the second time that bids had been received. The first were rejected because of high estimates. The span will be approx. 225 feet in length and was to be one of two types of draw bridges. It was not know yet when work on the span would start. WILM.STAR, 12-14-1929

January 20, 1930
Construction of the temporary wooden bridge at the intersection of the Carolina Beach road with section five of the Beaufort-Cape Fear inland waterway system was scheduled to begin in the near future. Detour approaches and embankments had already been constructed. The temporary span was to be used for 11 months or so. The wooden bridge was to be built on the river side of the beach highway. WILM.NEWS, 1-20-1930

March 9, 1930
Rapid progress on the dredging of Section Five of the Intracoastal Waterway canal had brought earlier use than expected for the temporary wooden bridge across the waterway on the Carolina Beach Road. The temporary bridge was not entirely completed but the structure was deemed safe for traffic. The early traffic was due to crowds of people wanting to view the progress of the dredging, and they crossed and re-crossed the bridge. The temporary bridge was built about 200 yards north of the main highway bridge. The highway was severed by the dredge before the wooden bridge was completed and forces had to speed up for the opening. So many spectators came by automobile to see the progress of the dredge that traffic at one time was almost an unbroken line of cars from the city to the beach. WILM.STAR, 3-10-1930

March 27, 1930
Secretary of War in Washington allotted $135,000 for construction work on the Inland Waterway from Beaufort to Cape Fear River. According to the Wilmington office of the U.S. Army engineer, this money was to be used in the construction of a permanent bridge across the waterway on the Wilmington-Carolina Beach highway, as there was only a temporary structure at the crossing point on the highway at present. Bids for work on the bridge were opened some time ago, but the award of the contract was never made by the engineering department. In the meantime, money for the bridge had been spent on dredging work, on section 4 of the waterway. This allotment was thus made by the Secretary of War for the erection of the bridge. WILM.STAR, 3-28-1930.

April 4, 1930
The connection of the Cape Fear River with Myrtle Grove Sound, by way of the Inland Waterway, was completed when the dredge of the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Company, working on Section Five of the Waterway, cut through to the sound. Reaching the sound brings near completion of the work on Section Five, which was halted for some time by the failure of the company to which the contract was originally awarded. WILM.STAR, 4-5-1930.

snows_cut_1964November 25, 1930
Construction of the $110,000 draw-bridge over the Inland Waterway near Carolina Beach on Route No. 40, was begun by the Roanoke Iron and Bridge Works, of Roanoke, Va. A small group of workmen began the building operations.
A center pier was to be set in place within the next few days. The span was to be completed before the 1931 season at the beach. The contract was let over a year earlier by government officials but on account of various changes in the plans work had been delayed until today. Local labor was to be used where possible.
WILM.STAR, 11-26-1930; WILM.NEWS, 11-13-1930;11-20-1930;11-25-1930. See also WILM.NEWS, 6-5-1930;11-13-1930;1-20-1931;3-12-1931

April 6, 1931
The Wilmington District Engineers reported that the draw bridge spanning the Inland Waterway canal would probably be open for traffic by July 1st. The bridge was to have an 80-foot draw and a clearance of 20 feet when closed. The span will be in constant use when completed due to the many small vessels using the waterway canal. At present a wooden bridge is being used. WILM.STAR, 4-6-1931; WILM.NEWS, 6-15-1931; WILM.NEWS, 8-15-1930?

October 22, 1931
The temporary wooden bridge over the Inland Waterway on the Carolina Beach Road was burned yesterday at the command of the district army engineer’s office. Oil soaked waste was used in starting the blaze. After the draw burned through and fell into the canal, all the wreckage was removed. WILM.NEWS, 10-23-1931.

April 22, 1947
The Snow’s Cut bridge was thrown out of business by a broken shaft, which jammed a gear. D . W. Stewart, operator of the bridge, said that the damages would not interfere with inland waterway traffic, and a new bridge shaft would soon be installed. WILM.NEWS, 4-23-1947

November 11, 1961
Pillars to support the new fixed span bridge across the Inland Waterway near Carolina Beach were in place. The bridge was not a “high-level” bridge, but was high enough to permit passage of boats using the waterway and would eliminate most of the congestion caused by pile-up of autos held up by the draw. THE STATE magazine, 11- 11-1961.

maj_william_snow