Monthly Meeting Report – October, 2009 – Penderlea Homestead

October’s Meeting

Elaine Henson who gave an entertaining pictorial talk about Major William Snow and the creation of Snow’s Cut in 1929. Elaine has many pictures of Carolina Beach prior to the Cut. The Major graduated from West Point in 1916 as an engineer, came to Wilmington in 1926 and built a lovely home in 1927 which is still an active residence. He was assigned to manage the IntraCoastal Waterway from Beaufort to the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The first bridge to Carolina Beach was a one-lane swing bridge, and that one was replaced in 1962 with the current four-lane high rise.

Trip to Penderlea

v16NONovember 2009 PDF-003v16NONovember 2009 PDF-004Elaine Henson and Ann Cottle organized a wonderful trip to the Penderlea Homestead Museum near Wallace. Along with Elaine and Ann longtime FPHPS members Darlene & Leslie Bright, Lois and Rebecca Taylor and Connie Burns as well as new members Bettie West and Charlotte Davis gathered at the Mad Boar Restaurant just off I-40. Joining us were Candace McGreevy and five Latimer House docents from the Historical Society of the Lower Cape Fear,

We had a great time “cross pollinating” and sharing stories of many adventures in local history. Leslie Bright won the day with his stories of finding shipwrecks all along coastal NC.

After lunch we set off across country to visit the Potts Memorial Presbyterian Church. We saw their fellowship hall which was originally built here on Federal Point where it served as the chapel for the WWII Air Force Base. Then we toured the beautiful sanctuary building which was originally the church at Camp Davis.

Both buildings were taken apart and moved board by board and brick by brick to the Penderlea community when the government no longer needed them. You can even see some of the the markings that the master carpenter made on each piece to tell him how to re-assemble each building.

From the church we drove to the nearby Homestread Museum located in one the the original 10 houses. They have done a wonderful job of restoring the building and its out-buildings and have a great many items on display. From kitchen goods and period clothing to pictures of Eleanor Roosevlet’s visit in August of 1937 depression era family life comes alive. If you haven‟t been up there it’s a perfect day trip into a very different and unique era of time.