President’s Letter – August, 2018

By Elaine Henson

Boardwalk, Part IV

The May 19, 1941 edition of the Wilmington Morning Star reported 10,000 people at Carolina Beach over the weekend with most of the boardwalk businesses rebuilt after the tragic fire the year before.

By the official opening of the summer season on June 6th, the new Hotel Bame and Palais Royal Hotel were open along with the new Wave Theater.  The midway had more rides, more concessions, larger stores and wider and longer boardwalks lined with benches.  The “South’s Miracle Beach” had indeed recovered and was on the way to even busier days and nights with the advent of World War II.

Wilmington and the surrounding beaches swelled with people during the 1940s, especially after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

New Hanover County’s population went from 42,000 to over 100,000 with the NC Shipbuilding Company, defense workers and military personnel.  Soldiers from Camp Davis, Fort Bragg, Camp Lejeune and Fort Fisher flocked to our area on weekends when they had leave.

Many soldiers camped out with their regiments on the north end where Freeman Park is now. The Greystone Hotel on Cape Fear Boulevard became a USO and the boardwalk was filled with soldiers and military police, a trend that would continue even after the war years.

Carolina Beach Postmaster, W.H. Blair, reported an average of 25,000 cards a week were mailed in a 1941 article in the Carolina Beach Sun.  He said “I trace the main reason for this to the visit of many soldiers …. they send mail to every state in the union.” 

The August 2, 1941 issue of the Carolina Beach Sun shows an article on the 1,000 soldiers from Fort Bragg’s 36th Regiment that camped out on the north end of Carolina Beach.  Another article is about the 40, 000 visitors at the beach the previous weekend and another on the 25,000 post cards mailed from the resort.

Next month: Boardwalk Part V