2018 “Beat the Heat” Lecture Series ~~ Saturdays At 2:00

All Programs at the Fort Fisher State Historic Site

June 16: “The Faces of Fort Fisher” –  The stories of Fort Fisher detail the struggle for the Fort. But just as important are the stories of the people who populated the fort and its two battles. Join us as Dr. Chris Fonvielle discusses the people who lived, worked, fought, and died at Fort Fisher. Copies of his books will be on sale and can be signed by the author.

June 23 : “The WASP Program and Fort Fisher” – During World War II, the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, or WASP, were the first women trained to fly our military’s front line arsenal. In July 1943, the first 25 specially selected women arrived at the Camp Davis Army Air Field with orders to provide targets for the Anti-Aircraft training happening in the area. Join us as Assistant Site Manager, John Moseley, presents this unique story and its connection to Fort Fisher’s Antiaircraft Firing Point.

June 30: “The Roots of Colonial Resistance to Stamp Act and the Road to Revolution”  – Parliament’s Stamp Act of 1765 focused colonial resistance to Great Britain’s attempts to impose new taxes on the colonies without the consent of colonial legislatures. The rise of colonial resistance was also based on fiscal policy leading to an attempt to arrest British officials in Brunswick Town and placed Governor Tryon under a short house arrest. Join us as Fort Fisher Interpreter, Rick Morrison, a retired US Navy Captain, discusses this unique facet in our local history.

July 7: “The Silent Sentinels” – We pass them all the time. They dot our State’s roads, parks and cemeteries. John Winecoff, of the North Carolina Military History Society, has spent years documenting all the military memorials in North Carolina’s 100 counties. They are the silent  witnesses to the sacrifices of our men and women in over 243 years of our country’s history.

July 14: “At the Mercy of the Angel of Death: The 1862 Wilmington Yellow Fever Epidemic” –  During the Civil War, the mosquito carried a dark and deadly secret. Learn how this little bug and its pathological comrades waged their own biological warfare upon unsuspecting soldiers and citizens. Shannon Walker, Interpreter at Brunswick Town Fort Anderson State Historic Site, will be here to discuss this insect and the deadly Civil War medical issues it brought.

July 21: “General Lee’s Immortals” –  During the Civil War, North Carolina fielded numerous infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. One of those units was the Brach-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia. The unit formed in 1861 and fought from the Seven Days’ battle to the final surrender at Appomattox. Join historian and author, Michael C. Hardy, and explore this history of one of North Carolina’s storied units in the Civil War.

July 28: “Welcoming Sherman: Wilmington and the Cape Fear” –   With the fall of Wilmington, Federal forces were able to use the Cape Fear River as a much needed supply base.  Mr. Wade Sokolosky, a retired career army officer, will discuss the US Navy and Army’s use of  the Cape Fear River to support  Sherman’s troops in Fayetteville. Copies of his book on the Battle of Wyes Fork will be on sale and can be signed by the author.

August 4: “A Post-War Confederate Sailor: Finding H.S. Lebby, Blockade Runner and Privateer”  – Sailors’ Snug Harbor, New York, a retirement home for the purpose of caring for ‘worn out and decrepit sailors,” opened its doors in 1833 on Staten Island to all seamen from all countries. Henry Sterling (H. S.) Lebby noted on his application he had worked on merchant vessels for the US. And yet, it is clear from records in South Carolina, H.S. Lebby was not the man he claimed to be.  Who is Captain Lebby and why is he in New York living out his last years at Sailors’ Snug Harbor?