Kure Beach Progressive Association – Notes from 1946

Historic Feature — Kure Beach Progressive Association
By Ann Hertzler

[From a notebook from the 1940s at the KB town hall details work of the Kure Beach Progressive Association.]

A meeting of the citizens of Kure Beach was held in the Kure Memorial Chapel Monday night, Dec 31, 1945 with 16 present. Mr. Weinburg, acting chairman, explained that the purpose of the meeting was to discuss ways and means of securing fire protection, as the only security now is the insurance carried…. Mr. L.C.Kure would furnish the water and fittings; decided that we purchase 500‟ of hose. Property owners were contacted and informed of actions. ($200 pledged, $115 paid)

Jan 8, 1946  “Kure Beach Progressive Association”
Chairman Mr. L. E.Wienburg
Secy Mrs. C B Fry
Treas Mr. L. C. Kure
Advisory Committee. – Bob Ford, L. C. Kure, FM Steinfurth
Other Committees elected: By-Laws, Auditing, Financial, Maintenance Mr. Kure reported the hose is expected next week. Cost $284.50

Jan 15, 1946 – Mr. Kure made a trip to Fayetteville to look at a fire truck; not successful. Mr. Manning reported a ford truck has been sent to Camp Davis for sale.

Jan 22, 1946 – A motion was made to photograph the ponds of water and take before the County Commissioners in regards to sanitary conditions in and around Kure Beach ….

Jan 29, 1946 – 5th meeting
Photographs of the ponds, ditches and other places of stagnation has been made by Mrs. Weinburg; to be taken to County Commissioners, … along with as many members as possible, especially the ladies, and ….a signed petition.

Feb 5, 1946 – Ways and Means Comm: Mrs. Hewitt, Chr, plans of suppers, dances, shows, Bingo, etc. but the question is where these events are to be given considering meetings are now being held in the Chapel. Mr. Weinburg offers his new building for quick use; Mr. Kure offers his building next to Mr. Flowers Store… Suggestions to secure Brakers Hall dance room for the dances. Two turkeys to be donated by Mr. Flowers and Mr. Kure for a turkey supper.
Col. Pool asked about trash disposal. Mrs. Weinburg volunteered to survey residents willing to pay to haul away all garbage.

Feb 12, 1946 – Mesars Kure, Hers? And Ford went to Ft Fisher to see about a Fire Truck – found a building for $50 that can be demounted and moved; and put on a lot donated by Mr. Kure to house the fire truck and other equipment.
Proposal for street lighting explained in detail; and the fire alarm system. (a strong siren and other fire alarms.)

Feb 19, 1946 – The turkey supper will be held at Jim‟s Café Saturday night the 23, at $1.00/ plate.

March 5, 1946 Mr. Pinkston is trying to secure safety Highway signs to be posted at the intersection.

March 12, 1946 – Mr. King reports that at present time the fire truck is being housed in the McManus Garage. As this is to small he suggests the pipe etc be moved from the pump house to take care of truck.
Mr. King reports no sirene on truck and suggests we look into this.
Meeting of the Home Demonstration Club will be held at Mrs. Tanners Wed. afternoon. Mr. OBrien announced a Benefit supper for the Chapel will be given Friday

March 19, 1946 – The siren in Wilmington was not acceptable; agreed to order a streamline flasher type for $16.02.

March 26, 1946 – Specine Committee: called on Dr. Elliott and he gave assurance of full cooperation and with authority from Sheriff Jones. He appointed Chief Pinkston on the health force for our Territory…

April 2, 1936 – Mr Kure reports that the Tide Water Power Co had approved our proposal but are unable to furnish the necessary supplies at the present time. Mr. Kure states that if we will join him in setting the poles he will furnish the wire and power for temporary lights – to be discussed.

April 16, 1946 – Mr. A Nichols, City Mgn of Wilmington offers to sell the fire truck we now have for $1250.
Mr. King reports lights on Avenue K now complete.
Mrs. Tavis reports a Turkey Supper will be given April 27 at the Sea Gull restaurant.

June 25, 1946 – Mr. Flowers: proposed constitution and By Laws; held for study till the next meeting. (passed Aug 13)
The city manage will accept $1000 for the truck, a cash payment of $600 and $400 to be paid. Mr. Kure reports that the drainage proposal has been accepted (proposal not included).

 

Monthly Meeting Report – October, 2009 – Penderlea Homestead

October’s Meeting

Elaine Henson who gave an entertaining pictorial talk about Major William Snow and the creation of Snow’s Cut in 1929. Elaine has many pictures of Carolina Beach prior to the Cut. The Major graduated from West Point in 1916 as an engineer, came to Wilmington in 1926 and built a lovely home in 1927 which is still an active residence. He was assigned to manage the IntraCoastal Waterway from Beaufort to the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The first bridge to Carolina Beach was a one-lane swing bridge, and that one was replaced in 1962 with the current four-lane high rise.

Trip to Penderlea

v16NONovember 2009 PDF-003v16NONovember 2009 PDF-004Elaine Henson and Ann Cottle organized a wonderful trip to the Penderlea Homestead Museum near Wallace. Along with Elaine and Ann longtime FPHPS members Darlene & Leslie Bright, Lois and Rebecca Taylor and Connie Burns as well as new members Bettie West and Charlotte Davis gathered at the Mad Boar Restaurant just off I-40. Joining us were Candace McGreevy and five Latimer House docents from the Historical Society of the Lower Cape Fear,

We had a great time “cross pollinating” and sharing stories of many adventures in local history. Leslie Bright won the day with his stories of finding shipwrecks all along coastal NC.

After lunch we set off across country to visit the Potts Memorial Presbyterian Church. We saw their fellowship hall which was originally built here on Federal Point where it served as the chapel for the WWII Air Force Base. Then we toured the beautiful sanctuary building which was originally the church at Camp Davis.

Both buildings were taken apart and moved board by board and brick by brick to the Penderlea community when the government no longer needed them. You can even see some of the the markings that the master carpenter made on each piece to tell him how to re-assemble each building.

From the church we drove to the nearby Homestread Museum located in one the the original 10 houses. They have done a wonderful job of restoring the building and its out-buildings and have a great many items on display. From kitchen goods and period clothing to pictures of Eleanor Roosevlet’s visit in August of 1937 depression era family life comes alive. If you haven‟t been up there it’s a perfect day trip into a very different and unique era of time.

Monthly Meeting – Nov. 2009 – ‘The Kure Family Legacy ‘

November Meeting – Monday November 16, 2009

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, November 16 at 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Ellen Kure

Ellen Kure

 

Hans A. Kure

Hans A. Kure

Our program this month will be a showing a section of the video The Kure Family Legacy made in 1991, produced by the Kure Family. Featured in the narration are A.E. “Punky” Kure, Pat Robertson Rice, Mike Robertson and the late Jennie Kure Robertson Bagley.

The story concentrates on the early years from Hans Anderson Kure and his wife Ellen‟s immigration to America and the establishment of their family in Wilmington.

Hans was a ship’s chandler and owner of numerous warehouses and steamers in the early 1890s, when Wilmington was a large and prosperous port. We learn about the first generation, William, Hans, Lawrence, Andrew, and Elene.

Invited to join us for the evening are “Punky” Kure, Mike Robertson, and Pat Rice who will answer questions and lead a discussion on the history of the Kure Family.

The program is in memory of Jennie Bagley, who passed away in September. She was a charter member of Kure Lutheran Memorial Church, and worked at UNC-Wilmington and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Her memories provide a fascinating peek at the early years of the development of Fort Fisher Seabeach, and the Kure Beach pier.

 


Monthly Meeting Report for November, 2009 – Published in the December, 2009 Newsletter

Over 50 people enjoyed a segment of the The Kure Family Legacy DVD. The segment covered the very early years of Hans and Ellen Kure’s lives and how they came to America and to the North Carolina Coast.

They must have been truly amazing people. Ellen Kure went from being a lady-in-waiting to the Royal Court in Denmark to raising a family and helping her husband build up his business in the primitive conditions of Kure Beach and the more civilized conditions of Wilmington (Most years they spent summers at the beach and winters in Wilmington) before the turn to the twentieth century.

I just love this note in the Bill Reaves files:

“July 4, 1895 FEDERAL POINT. A large number of people visited Carolina Beach and spent a quiet, pleasant day. There was music for dancing all day, which was taken advantage of by a large number. Several fishing parties went out in the afternoon. The surf bathers were on hand in large numbers. Mrs. Mayo and Mrs. Kure had all they could do serving guests with sea delicacies. The last boat to Wilmington returned at 9:30 p.m. and the ride on the river was delightful. WILM.STAR, 7-6-1895.”

A huge thanks to “Punky” Kure, Pat Rice, and “Curly” Shands for answering questions and adding comentary at the end of the film.

Snow’s Cut Bridge – From the Bill Reaves Files

snows_cut-steelJuly 4, 1929
Bids for construction of a temporary bridge over the Inland Waterway, at the point were it crosses the Carolina Beach highway, at an estimated cost of $10,000 was asked for and was to be opened in the office of the Wilmington District engineer.The temporary span would be constructed for traffic over the 75-foot ditch. It was announced also that bid for a permanent bridge over the canal at this point, were asked for and the bids were to be opened by the district engineer of July 25th. This structure was to cost approx. $100,000. WILM.STAR, 7-4-1929

December 14, 1929
Bids for the erection of a steel bridge on the Carolina Beach highway at the point of intersection of the Intra-Coastal Waterway, now under construction, were to be opened today in the Wilmington office of the North Carolina District of Army Engineers. This was the second time that bids had been received. The first were rejected because of high estimates. The span will be approx. 225 feet in length and was to be one of two types of draw bridges. It was not know yet when work on the span would start. WILM.STAR, 12-14-1929

January 20, 1930
Construction of the temporary wooden bridge at the intersection of the Carolina Beach road with section five of the Beaufort-Cape Fear inland waterway system was scheduled to begin in the near future. Detour approaches and embankments had already been constructed. The temporary span was to be used for 11 months or so. The wooden bridge was to be built on the river side of the beach highway. WILM.NEWS, 1-20-1930

March 9, 1930
Rapid progress on the dredging of Section Five of the Intracoastal Waterway canal had brought earlier use than expected for the temporary wooden bridge across the waterway on the Carolina Beach Road. The temporary bridge was not entirely completed but the structure was deemed safe for traffic. The early traffic was due to crowds of people wanting to view the progress of the dredging, and they crossed and re-crossed the bridge. The temporary bridge was built about 200 yards north of the main highway bridge. The highway was severed by the dredge before the wooden bridge was completed and forces had to speed up for the opening. So many spectators came by automobile to see the progress of the dredge that traffic at one time was almost an unbroken line of cars from the city to the beach. WILM.STAR, 3-10-1930

March 27, 1930
Secretary of War in Washington allotted $135,000 for construction work on the Inland Waterway from Beaufort to Cape Fear River. According to the Wilmington office of the U.S. Army engineer, this money was to be used in the construction of a permanent bridge across the waterway on the Wilmington-Carolina Beach highway, as there was only a temporary structure at the crossing point on the highway at present. Bids for work on the bridge were opened some time ago, but the award of the contract was never made by the engineering department. In the meantime, money for the bridge had been spent on dredging work, on section 4 of the waterway. This allotment was thus made by the Secretary of War for the erection of the bridge. WILM.STAR, 3-28-1930.

April 4, 1930
The connection of the Cape Fear River with Myrtle Grove Sound, by way of the Inland Waterway, was completed when the dredge of the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Company, working on Section Five of the Waterway, cut through to the sound. Reaching the sound brings near completion of the work on Section Five, which was halted for some time by the failure of the company to which the contract was originally awarded. WILM.STAR, 4-5-1930.

snows_cut_1964November 25, 1930
Construction of the $110,000 draw-bridge over the Inland Waterway near Carolina Beach on Route No. 40, was begun by the Roanoke Iron and Bridge Works, of Roanoke, Va. A small group of workmen began the building operations.
A center pier was to be set in place within the next few days. The span was to be completed before the 1931 season at the beach. The contract was let over a year earlier by government officials but on account of various changes in the plans work had been delayed until today. Local labor was to be used where possible.
WILM.STAR, 11-26-1930; WILM.NEWS, 11-13-1930;11-20-1930;11-25-1930. See also WILM.NEWS, 6-5-1930;11-13-1930;1-20-1931;3-12-1931

April 6, 1931
The Wilmington District Engineers reported that the draw bridge spanning the Inland Waterway canal would probably be open for traffic by July 1st. The bridge was to have an 80-foot draw and a clearance of 20 feet when closed. The span will be in constant use when completed due to the many small vessels using the waterway canal. At present a wooden bridge is being used. WILM.STAR, 4-6-1931; WILM.NEWS, 6-15-1931; WILM.NEWS, 8-15-1930?

October 22, 1931
The temporary wooden bridge over the Inland Waterway on the Carolina Beach Road was burned yesterday at the command of the district army engineer’s office. Oil soaked waste was used in starting the blaze. After the draw burned through and fell into the canal, all the wreckage was removed. WILM.NEWS, 10-23-1931.

April 22, 1947
The Snow’s Cut bridge was thrown out of business by a broken shaft, which jammed a gear. D . W. Stewart, operator of the bridge, said that the damages would not interfere with inland waterway traffic, and a new bridge shaft would soon be installed. WILM.NEWS, 4-23-1947

November 11, 1961
Pillars to support the new fixed span bridge across the Inland Waterway near Carolina Beach were in place. The bridge was not a “high-level” bridge, but was high enough to permit passage of boats using the waterway and would eliminate most of the congestion caused by pile-up of autos held up by the draw. THE STATE magazine, 11- 11-1961.

maj_william_snow

Big Daddy’s

by Ann Hertzler

Doris Eakes worked at Smitty’s for Charles Smith when he purchased the corner where Big Daddy’s is located today. He shortly opened a miniature golf course (a put-putt) on the front part of the lots. Tom Lancaster purchased the corner from the Smith’s, added a small building behind the golf course, rented dune buggies, and sold hot dogs and hamburgers. A little later ice cream and pizza were added.

Big DaddysFor the kids, he started an “Open Air” dance hall space out front. The music was loud! Lancaster was his own advertising media, driving his big Cadillac convertible all over the beach with large bull horns mounted on the hood blasting messages for everyone to come to Big Daddy’s for dinner! He tried everything – first a breakfast house, an ice cream store, a full service restaurant with a buffet dining room, then a Steak House. By the early 70’s Lancaster settled on seafood, steaks, and lobster tails.

Of the original 8 or 9 Big Daddy’s across NC and one in SC, there are now only two Big Daddy’s stores – Kure Beach owned by Eakes and one at Lake Norman owned by Fred Lancaster, Tom Lancaster’s grandson.

Both stores serve “Seafood at it’s Best.” Eakes (one of the first radar operators to arrive at the beach in 1965) and Doris (nursing student attending James Walker School of Nursing in 1956) married in December 1956. The Eakes’ purchased the Kure Beach store in 1981. As of 2008 Mr. Gerald Huffman continues to manage Big Daddy’s of Kure Beach, keeping a steady and pleasant staff which is frequented by locals and visitors alike.

Major James Reilly

Historic Feature
by Col. Black Jack Travis

Major James Reilly was born on April 4th 1822 in Ballydonagh, Ireland. He immigrated to the US as a teenager. By the summer of 1845 he had enlisted in the US Army at Fort Columbus, NY. He participated as an artillerist in the War with Mexico and was promoted to the rank of sergeant. His military career then took him to Oklahoma Territory and the Indian Wars.

Major James ReillyBy 1860 he was in command at Fort Johnston in Southport, NC. When the hostilities broke out between the North and South, James Reilly chose the cause for Southern Independence. Promoted to Captain he took command of 10th NC. First Artillery which become known as the “Rowan Artillery.” He served with the Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee. Reilly’s battery was rated 2nd in all of Lee’s artillery. After the battle of Gettysburg on September 7th he was promoted to Major and transferred to Wilmington, NC where he served with distinction at Fort Fisher.

Major Reilly was present at the first Union attack on Fort Fisher on December 24th . When the Union made its 2nd attack on the Fort on January 15th 1865, Major Reilly was the highest ranking officer still standing . Fighting with great bravery and valor as Fort Fisher was overwhelmed by the Union forces, he surrendered the Fort at Battery Buchanan on the evening of the 15th.

Reilly was married to Ann Quinn from 1848-1877. In 1878 he married Martha E. Henry. After the war he served as the manager for Brunswick Ferry Company. H e also farmed and built a Catholic Church at Farmer’s Turnout, NC (Brunswick County) near his second wife’s family. He died on November 7th 1894.

July 1, 1920 – Food Prices – From the Bill Reaves Files

Room and Board

A.W. Pate, proprietor of the Greystone Inn, Carolina Beach, offered the following rates:

  • American Plan  – $5.50
  • Weekly (without bath) – $28.00
  • European Plan $2.00 – $2.50
  • Weekly (with bath) – $31.50
  • Meals – $1.25

June 16, 1929 (advertisement) BAME’S CAFÉ, Carolina Beach, Now Open for Season. We Serve Regular Sea Food Dinners. Also Vegetable Dinners and Chicken Dinners. Try Our Fish and Corn Fritters and Coffee – 50 cents. Special Rates to Parties. We Sell $5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00. We Appreciate Your Patronage. J.R.BAME,Manager. WILM.NEWS DISPATCH, 6-16-1929

Land Values in the early Twentieth Century

April 22, 1904. – Real Estate Transfer- Marion F. Schroeder transferred to Brooks & Taylor, for $75, tract of land containing 50 acres, more or less, in Federal Point Township, beginning at a point known as the Old Newton Landing.  WILMINGTON STAR, 4-23-1904.

November, 17, 1905. – Real Estate Transfer – Ed Taylor and wife and John W. Brooks and wife to Samuel A. Lewis, of Shallotte, Brunswick County, for $95, a tract of land containing 50 acres and situated on the eastern side of the Cape Fear River near the old Newton Landing. WILMINGTON MESSENGER, 11-18-1905.

June 1, 1906. – Real Estate Transfer – Melvin L. Smith and wife to Ellen Kure, for the sum of $325, lot on Carolina Beach. WILMINGTON MESSENGER, 6-1-1906.
December 20, 1910 Real Estate Transfer – W. F. F. Newton and wife, et al., transfer to Archibald J. Hanby, for $100 and other considerations, 103 acres of land in Federal Point Township, adjoining lands of W. A. Ainsworth and others. WILMINGTON STAR, 12-21-1910.

reaves_taxes_due

 

 

Check Out These Prices! Food & Prices

by Ann HertzlerFood Prices - A&P  – [published in September, 2009 FPHPS Newsletter]

Food prices have changed in Kure Beach since the 1920s. A&P ads for July 4 specials in the Wilmington Morning Star were compared for 1927, 1937, 1947, and 1957. All A&P stores were closed during the July 4th holiday.

Ground beef did not appear in any July 4th A&P newspaper ad during this time.

  • In 1957, Ham was featured in every July 4 ad – 29¢ a pound in 1927; 53¢ a pound.
  • In 1957, Hot dogs (Frankfurters, Franks) were 23¢ a pound in 1937; 49¢ for 12 oz. in 1967. The price doubled and the package size decreased in this time period. All meat hot dogs were advertised.
  • In 1957, Peanut Butter was 19¢ a jar (size not listed) in 1927, and 55¢ for a 24 oz. jar.
  • In 1984, Food Lion advertised 5 lb. ground beef at 98 ¢ / lb (fresh daily); Ground Chuck 58 ¢ / lb
  • Ingredients for making baked beans, coleslaw, and potato salad were advertised, but not the finished item.

Food & Prices In 1978 in the Island Gazette, Food Lion advertised Cucumbers or Green Bell Peppers – 4/$1

  • Thompson Seedless Grapes – 69 ¢/lb.
  • Chuck Roast – $1.18 / lb.
  • broccoli – 79 ¢ /bunch
  • Coke 6-Pack – $0.99
  • pound sugar – $0.27
  • gallon milk – $1.01
  • dozen eggs – $0.87

Convenience mixes advertised in 1978 were Hamburger Helper, Shake n’ Bake, Stove Top Dressings, Coffee Creamers, Frozen Pie Crusts, Green Giant Frozen Foods.

Lunch in a restaurant was $1.56. Popular food items at beach restaurants were fried fish, sweet tea, one pot meals, French fries, and corn meal items. (Island Gazette 1978- 2003 Collectors Edition)

The Vanished House – 1914

May 2, 1914

The Vanished HouseTHE VANISHED HOUSE – A two-room frame dwelling recently erected by Messrs. G. H. and M. A. Currie, of Clarkton, in Federal Point Township, to replace one that was burned by an incendiary three months earlier, was torn down and removed to some point not yet revealed to the owners and the tenant, Taylor Clifton, an aged white man, who was missing and there was a suspicion that he had met with foul play. Mr. Clifton had lived in the house for two weeks earlier, having moved there from Clarkton, and he had relatives living in Wilmington.

The house was completely dismantled with every vestige of lumber removed, and with it all the furniture and effects in the dwelling. The site of the house was between the river and the ocean about 1 1⁄2 miles south of the Carolina Beach pier. It had been completed only two weeks before its disappearance on the site of the burned dwelling. (Wilmington Dispatch, 5-11-1914)

May 12, 1914
The vanished house on the Cape Fear River, near Carolina Beach pier, was found.

May 12, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – The vanished house on the Cape Fear River, near Carolina Beach pier, was found. Deputy Sheriff W. H. Kermon reported that he found the lumber of the dwelling that disappeared in the yard of Mr. T. H. Nelson. Five men, Messrs. A. W. Pate, W. M. Pate, and T. H. Nelson, white, and Frank Murphy and Henry Farrow, colored, were arrested under a warrant charging that they had removed the house. Warrants were out for two other colored persons.

The old man who mysteriously disappeared about the time the house was torn to the ground was reported as having left Wilmington on a north-bound train. Why he left the house immediately preceding its demolition was still a question.

One of the owners admitted that there had been a controversy about the land upon which the dwelling was located between G. H. and M. A. Currie, of Clarkton and the Hanover Transit Company, of which Mr. A. W. Pate was president. (Wilmington Dispatch, 5-12-1914)

May 13, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – Complaint in the case of Alexander W. Pate and Joseph J. Loughlin against Geroge H. Currie and his wife, Nell A. Currie. W. H. Kermon and H. Mack Godwin, was instituted in Superior Court. It was an action for $10,000 alleged damages to land in federal Point Township which the plaintiffs claim have been in their absolute possession for over 30 years.

The land in controversy, Mr. Currie claimed was inherited by him. It was now a part of a large tract which Messrs. Pate & Loughlin, under the name of New Hanover Transit Company, were developing in Federal Point Township.

The bringing of the suit by Messrs. Pate & Loughlin follows closely the indictment of Mr. Pate and six others on a charge of demolishing and removing a small two-room frame dwelling which was located on the land in dispute and occupied the site of another small building which had been burned about three months earlier. The building had been erected by the defendant Currie.

The plaintiffs allege that the defendant in the action did, with force and arms, on December 22nd, 1913, enter upon a portion of this tract at the southwestern part and trespassed upon land which had been in the possession on the plaintiffs for a long time and was at that time posted. It is further averred that a shack was built without the knowledge of the plaintiffs and that the defendants did wrongfully place some person in charge of the building for the purpose of wrongfully taking possession of the land in question. A few days later the shack was burned and the plaintiffs aver that they are informed and believe that the fire occurred through the negligence of the agent of the defendant. The defendants repeatedly trespassed and entered upon the land after having been warned not to do so.

The complaint further sets out that the defendants had greatly damaged the property and had cut down trees. On or about April 29th, the defendants with a large force of men did build a barbed-wire fence along a portion of the lands in spite of a protest entered by Thomas E. Nelson, an agent of the plaintiffs.

A small house was built on the lands and this act had brought a cloud on the title to the land which had caused the plaintiffs great damage. The plaintiffs contended that the defendants had wrongfully, maliciously and willfully, with force and arms, attempted to wrest the possession of a portion of the said lands from the plaintiffs.

It was also set forth in the complaint that G. H. Currie and two servants or employees, W. H. Kermon and H. Mack Godwin, both of whom were armed with pistols and one with a black-jack, trespassed upon the land and that the latter two did, over protest of the agent of the plaintiffs, spend the night of May 10th upon the lands. The plaintiffs alleged that H. Mack Godwin did use threatening language to some of the plaintiffs or their agents. (Wilmington Dispatch, 5-15-1914)

June 2, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – Two hundred dollars was Taylor Clifton’s price for decamping, according to evidence before the Recorder Judge in the case of J. J. Loughlin, Esq., and T. H. Nelson who were being tried for destroying a house near Carolina Beach. Clifton was now appearing against Nelson and Loughlin and his story served to clear some foggy points in the case.

He said that he was taken to the house by Mr. Currie, and instructed to stay there. On the following day, Mr. Loughlin came to him and asked him who he was and what he was doing there. Clifton said he told him that he was there for Mr. Currie and had instructions to keep trespassers off the property. Mr. Loughlin then told him that the property did not belong to Mr. Currie, and that he had best get off. Clifton then said that he did not see Mr. Loughlin again until several days later at Carolina Beach, when he informed Loughlin that he would not get off the land until he had heard from Mr. Currie. Nothing then occurred for several days.

Clifton said he could not sleep at night, because of unusual noises around the house – men talking in low tones of voice, etc. He said he was frightened. Ten days after he had arrived at the house he was approached by a man named Bryan, whom he said was employed by the Hanover Transit Company, of which Mr. Loughlin was an officer. Bryan asked him how much he wanted to get out. Clifton said that he replied that he would not leave for less than $200.

Bryan then replied that he would see what he could do, and left. He returned the next night and said that Clifton had a chance to get the $200 if he wanted it, whereupon the old man told him to bring it along.

Bryan arrived about daylight next morning, brought the $200, delivered it to Clifton, and received from Clifton $25 for his services. Clifton then left in an automobile that had been provided, came to Wilmington and then went to Virginia, where he spent a week and then returned to North Carolina, where he was arrested. The case was continued. (Wilmington Dispatch, 6-2-1914)

‘Federal Point Files’ – From the Bill Reaves Files

Oral History – Teens On the Beach – 1940’s and 1950’s

From interviews conducted by Ann Hertzler and Jeannie Gordon – Oral History Committee
Compiled by Ann Hertzler from interviews with Andy Canoutas, Glenn Flowers, Margaret Ford, Isabel Foushee, Jeannie Kure, Jack Lewis, Ed Niedens, Mike Robinson, Ray Rothrock and Dub Hegler)

Swimming:
Some mothers went to the beach with their children. One family had a little dog that walked in front of their young son to keep him from going in the ocean. Some children could go to the beach in the day time where they could be seen, but not after dark. Older kids would sit on the pier or on beach blankets. No one had chairs. They’d play in the water, walk on the beach, look for shells, talk, and be teenagers. It was an innocent time. Lawrence Kure told 14 year old Isabelle Lewis, Punkie Kure, Roberts Hall, and Sun Waters not to jump off the end of the pier (1943-44). They nonchalantly walked out, and then ran to the end ironing_board_surfof the pier, jumped in the water, and swam back.

Surfing:
In the 1940s, the ocean had big waves. You used an inner tube or jumped on a wave and body surfed. Surf boards or boogie boards hadn’t been invented yet. Body surfing was swimming with the crested wave, going down like a surf board, and skidding in. A perfect surf board for riding the waves was mother’s ironing board – a flat board about 5 ft long – 2 ft wide that lay between 2 chairs or on the kitchen table. “When the wave breaks, you’ve got to keep the nose of the ironing board up. If the nose goes down, the point digs into the sand and you “could flat get a belly ache.” Some Moms didn’t know her son used her ironing board until he forgot to bring it home. Some surfers got a wide board and cut it bow-shaped. Later Andy Canoutas obtained a 15’ surf board made by a friend, hollow on the inside so water had to be drained after each use. Mike Robertson brought in surf boards to rent at Kure Beach Pier.

Life Guards: surfers
Andy Canoutas was the first paid life guard by local businesses at Kure Beach when he was 15 (1950). Andy guarded up to 1963 from the first jetty south of the pier to the next jetty with a stand for him to sit on. He wore short, tight suits like boxer shorts. Tourists from nearby cottages crowded the beach with the life guard. Parents would look after the little ones; but the 8 to 11-year-old boys were the wild ones. In times of danger, Andy had a whistle to get their attention. He used a buoy to rescue a lot of people because of rip currents. Bobby Ford and Eddie Neidens were life guards. No radio or phone was available to call for help; but the lifeguard had a key to the Town Hall to get to the oxygen system. Individuals also saved lives of friends and neighbors stepping in a hole in the beach with tremendous sand bars at low tide and quickly going from waist deep to neck-deep, or caught in the rip current.