December Meeting – Holiday Potluck

Monday, December 12, 2016christmas

One week early due to Christmas, one hour early, too!

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, December 12, 6:30 p.m. at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its annual holiday potluck on Monday, December 12 at 6:30 pm.  This year we will be back at the History Center as it’s a lot easier for the hospitality committee. Please join us for food, fun and festivities.

Joining the festivities will be John Golden and his magic guitar as well as Jay and Deborah Hockenbury. Please feel free to bring family and friends to this cozy community get-together.

 

Events Calendar – Winter-Spring 2017

Monday, April 17, 2017: 7:30-9:00 pm.
Program:  Have you ever seen an old picture or post card of a Carolina Beach building and wondered where it was located or what is there today?

Elaine Henson will show businesses and buildings from long ago and what is there now, and in some cases, what was there in between.

 

 

 

 

 

 

chris-and-andre

Saturday, April 22, 2017 – Rescheduled
Original date: March 18, 2017 – Canceled because of rain.

Historian Chris Fonvielle will lead his annual walk along the remnants of the Sugar Loaf Line of Defense.  Pre-registration is required. Call 910-458-0502. A donation of $10.00 is requested.

 

Chris Fonvielle: Local history buffs hope to rediscover Rock Spring (StarNews Online, March 18, 2017) Members of the Public Archaeology Corps hope to excavate the site of the Rock Spring, underneath the soon-to-be-demolished Water Street parking deck.

 

 

 

 

chefs-of-the-coastMonday, May 15, 2017:  7:30-9:00.
Program: John Batchelor, author of the cookbook Chefs of the Coast will talk to us about his research in compiling the book and how North Carolina’s coastal cuisine is unique.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Located adjacent to Carolina Beach Municipal Complex

Monday, June 19, 2017: 6:30–8:30 pm.
Potluck Picnic
: The perfect time to bring  friends and prospective members.

 

 

 

 

ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC.

They are held at the Federal Point History Center,  1121-A North Lake Park Blvd. (Just south of the Carolina Beach Town Hall.)

Or visit the History Center, open Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays 10-4.

For more information call: 910-458-0502.

 

November Meeting – Travis Gilbert on the Ladies Memorial Association

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, November 21, 7:30 p.m. at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

This month our program will be presented by Travis Gilbert. He will talk on the Ladies Memorial Association, which, just confederate-monument-wilmingtonafter the Civil War, made it their mission to inter or re-inter the bodies of  Confederate soldiers and to raise monuments in their honor.

The first Ladies’ Memorial Association sprang up immediately after the end of the Civil War in Winchester, Virginia, which had suffered significantly during the war. Mary Dunbar Williams of Winchester organized a group of women to give proper burial to Confederate dead whose bodies were found in the countryside, and to decorate those graves annually.

Within a year seventy such organizations had been founded throughout the South. The Wilmington Ladies’ Memorial Association was founded in the summer of 1866 to provide an honorable burial for the hundreds of Confederate soldiers buried in unmarked, often unidentified, graves across Southeastern North Carolina.

confederate-soldiers-moundFounded by women such as Elizabeth Parsley, Catherine DeRosset Meares, and Julia Oakley, the Wilmington Ladies’ Memorial Association organized bazaars, hosted entertainments, and lobbied their male counterparts to establish the Confederate Soldiers Mound in Oakdale Cemetery.

Confederate Mound Plaque:  This monument was dedicated May 10, 1872. / To perpetuate deeds of the brave and in grateful tribute to the memory of 550 honored unknown / Confederate dead at the Battle of Fort Fisher / who live buried here.

By the spring of 1868, the association facilitated Wilmington’s first Confederate Memorial Day, and in 1872, dedicated a monument above the Confederate Mound. The ladies’ endeavors were an unprecedented expansion of the traditional southern women’s gender sphere and would lay the foundations for Wilmington’s chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the city’s Confederate relic room, and New Hanover County’s three Confederate monuments.

confederate-memorial-alabamaTravis Gilbert received his Bachelors of Arts in history from Hood College in Frederick, Maryland, where he completed original research on the Barbara Fritchie Memorial Association and Maryland secessionist, Enoch Louis Lowe. In addition, Gilbert worked at public history sites such as Monocracy National Battlefield and the Barbara Fritchie House Museum.

Gilbert is a docent at the Lower Cape Fear Historical Society and a volunteer at the Battleship North Carolina Memorial. Currently, he is completing a manuscript narrating women’s contributions to the rise of the Lost Cause in Wilmington, North Carolina, from 1865 until 1924. Please visit portcityredux.blogspot.com for updates on the manuscript’s progress or follow Gilbert on twitter @_travisjgilbert or Instagram @travisjgilbert

 

October Meeting – Remembering Hazel

View 47 photos of Hurricane Hazel in Carolina Beach, Oct. 15 1954:  Brummitt Collection

 

hazle-mapThe Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, October 17, 7:30 p.m. at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

This month our program will be “Remembering Hazel.” Steve Pfaff, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, returns to give an overview and how Hazel rates in the history of North Carolina hurricanes.

In addition we have Byron Moore and Charlie (Tommy) Greene, both long time members of our  Society, on board to talk about their personal experiences during and after noaaHazel.

From Wikipedia: At landfall on October 15, 1954, the hurricane brought a storm surge of over 18 feet to a large area of coastline, producing severe coastal damage; the damage was greater since the hurricane coincided with the highest lunar tide of the year.

Brunswick County, North Carolina, suffered the heaviest damage, where most coastal dwellings were either destroyed or severely damaged. For example, in Long Beach, North Carolina, only five of the 357 buildings were left standing.

The official report from the Weather Bureau in Raleigh, North Carolina stated that as a result of Hazel, “all traces of civilization on the immediate waterfront between the state line and Cape Fear were practically annihilated.” According to NOAA, “every pier in a distance of 170 miles of coastline was demolished”.

Nineteen people were killed in North Carolina, with several hundred more injured; 15,000 homes were destroyed and another 39,000 were damaged. The number of people left homeless by the storm was “uncounted thousands.” Damages in the Carolinas amounted to $163 million, with $61 million incurred by beachfront property. Total damage in the United States historic-plaqueranged from $281 million to $308 million.

While Hazel caused the most damage in the Carolinas, the storm did not lose all of its intensity. Going north, Hazel turned extratropical by midday when it merged with a cold front; however, it retained hurricane-strength winds and it was continuing to drop heavy rainfall.

 

September Meeting – Jim McKee on Archaeology at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, September 19, 7:30 p.m. at the JIM MCKEEFederal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Jim McKee will present a program called “Archaeology of Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson.” According to McKee, archaeology has been the primary source of information about the history of Brunswick.

After a nearly forty-year hiatus, archaeology is once again being regularly conducted at the Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson site. McKee will talk about what has been done in the past and what is planned for the future. Artifacts give us an idea of what life was like during Colonial times.

McKee plans to bring along a number of BrunsTown artifactoriginal items discovered during recent archaeological digs at the site – items that are not yet on public display.

Jim McKee is the site manager at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site. He is a graduate of Greensboro College and a passionate life-long student of American history.

He serves on numerous historic battlefield boards and participates in living history programs throughout the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states. Previously, he worked for the National Park Service and the NC Maritime Museum at Southport.

 

Island Day – 2016

Island DayThis year’s Island Day celebration will take place on Sunday, September 25. 

It’s a time for locals to let down from the Summer rush and meet and greet neighbors and friends. 

We will have a table giving out information about the Society and our current activities. 

If you can help for an hour or two, please call Rebecca at 458-0502.

 

 

 

Zach Hammer, Producer of ‘Summers at Seabreeze’

by Nancy Gadzuk

zachZach Hanner spoke at the July 18, 2016 monthly meeting of the Federal Point Historic Preservation Society.

Zach was the creator of the informative and entertaining musical production, Summers at Seabreeze, produced in 2015 at TheatreNOW, a performing arts complex in Wilmington featuring dinner theater.

Zach is Artistic Director of TheatreNOW, as well as being a driving force in many other artistic ventures in the Southeast.
summers-seabreeze-2Zach talked about his personal experiences that led to the creation of Summers at Seabreeze.

He’d been given the opportunity as a free-lance writer for the Wilmington Star-News to write an article about Seabreeze, the African-American beach community just north of Carolina Beach. But with documentary filmmaker Ken Burns as his role model, Zach wanted to do more than write a single article for the newspaper. And in 2014, he began to do just that.

He read existing writings about the community, including a UNCW master’s thesis on Seabreeze, and contacted about half a dozen former Seabreeze residents who were willing to share their experiences with him.

He learned about the ferry driver on the small ferry running between Seabreeze and Carolina Beach who would “whop rowdy passengers over the head with a cane,” presumably from one of those rowdy passengers. By the time Zach had interviewed three or four people, he said, “I knew I had a show.”

He combined the oral histories of his interviewees with other sources of local history to tell the story of Seabreeze during its heyday in the 20th century as an African-American resort.

Since both food and music were major components of life in Seabreeze, telling its story through a dinner theater production made perfect and delicious sense, with musical greats like Fats Domino visiting Seabreeze and enjoying their famous clam fritters.

Summers at Seabreeze

Summers at Seabreeze

I had the good fortune to enjoy Summers at Seabreeze when it played in Wilmington last summer – although as a long-time New Englander, I have to say that clam fritters are supposed to be round spheres, not pancakes like the ones served in Seabreeze.  But they were delicious!

While some of the actors in Summers at Seabreeze were seasoned professionals, some were not, and part of the experience, from Zach’s point of view, was to expand and grow all the participants.

Zach would like to stage another, perhaps larger scale, version of the play and hopes to explore that possibility in the future.

Those who saw Summers in Seabreeze last year certainly hope he does.

 

August Meeting – Jack Fryar on the American Revolution in the Cape Fear Area

Jack E Fryar Jr

Jack E. Fryar. Jr.

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, August 15, 7:30 p.m. at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Join author and historian, Jack E. Fryar. Jr. as he details the second half of the war in the South, especially as it occurred in North Carolina and the Cape Fear.

With the fall of Charleston in 1780, the Revolutionary War returned to the Carolinas with a vengeance. While the most famous battles of America’s war for independence were fought in the North, the decisive battles were fought in the South, at places like Camden, Ninety-Six, Cowpens, King’s Mountain, and Guilford Courthouse.

When Gen. Charles Lord Cornwallis began his Southern Campaign to return the Carolinas to the Crown’s control, Wilmington and southeastern North Carolina played a pivotal role in his plans.

Jack E. Fryar, Jr. is the author or editor of twenty-two books of Cape Fear and North Carolina history. He holds masters degrees in history and teaching and is the owner of Dram Tree Books, a small press specializing in books about the four centuries of great history in the Carolinas.

Jack is about to launch Carolina Chronicles Magazine, a new digital history publication that will focus on the history of both North and South Carolina. A lifelong resident of the Cape Fear region, Jack lives in Wilmington with his wife, Cherie.

 

Thank You – Towns of Carolina Beach & Kure Beach

August, 2016

Resolution:

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society would like to thank the towns of Carolina Beach and Kure Beach for their generous donations to be used for the operation of the Federal Point History Center which is a function of the Society. 

We appreciate their continued support of our mission to preserve, protect, and promote the rich history of the Federal Point area.

 
 
 
 

Events Calendar: 2016-2017 Presentations

——— Past Meetings – 2017 ———

Monday, April 17, 2017: 7:30-9:00 pm. (past meetings)

Program:  Have you ever seen an old picture or post card of a Carolina Beach building and wondered where it was located or what is there today?

Elaine Henson will show businesses and buildings from long ago and what is there now, and in some cases, what was there in between.

 

 

 

 

 

chris-and-andre

Saturday, April 22, 2017 – Rescheduled
Original date: March 18, 2017 – Canceled because of rain.

Historian Chris Fonvielle will lead his annual walk along the remnants of the Sugar Loaf Line of Defense.  Pre-registration is required. Call 910-458-0502. A donation of $10.00 is requested.  (past meetings)

Chris Fonvielle: Local history buffs hope to rediscover Rock Spring (StarNews Online, March 18, 2017) Members of the Public Archaeology Corps hope to excavate the site of the Rock Spring, underneath the soon-to-be-demolished Water Street parking deck.

john-moseley

Monday, March 20, 2017: 7:30-9:00 pm. (past meetings)

Program: John Moseley of the Fort Fisher State Historic Site returns to talk on US Medal of Honor Winners from the Lower Cape Fear area.

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, February 20, 2017:  7:30-9:00 pm.(past meetings)

Program: Kemp Burdett, Cape Fear River Keeper will talk to us about his work to protect the water quality and ecosystem of the Cape Fear River.

 

 

 

 

Monday, January 16, 2017: 7:30-9:00 pm.   (past meetings)
Program:  Jan Davidson of the Cape Fear Museum will talk about WWI in Wilmington as well as how it has been memorialized in our area. We will be doing a WWI exhibit in the Spring of 2017 and this will be our kickoff.


——— Past Meetings – 2016 ———

View recent 2016 events ..