Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce Foundation Honors Us!

v20NO9 September 2013 FINAL PDF-009Who knew?
Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce Foundation Honors Us!

At our July board meeting Bruce Holsten who is Chairman of the Pleasure Island Foundation for a Sustainable Community presented the following resolution, along with a wonderfully unexpected $1,000 check. Thanks so very much!

Resolved

  • A community and its citizens are defined by its history, and this is especially important when it has also played such a critical role in the history not just of our State, but our Country, as well;
  • The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society through its historical and genealogical research, public education, documentation and preservation of key historical sites on and around our Island, has helped preserve the historical integrity of our area for future generations;
  • More importantly, by maintaining the Federal Point History Center, it has enabled thousands of residents and visitors to understand the role our small island played in the founding and preservation of our Country;
  • For over 19 years, your Society has served an important role in helping us all remember and understand that our history is something we should be proud of, and that it deserves the financial support not only of your guests and patrons, but of all the citizens and businesses of this wonderful Island.
  • In recognition of your tireless volunteer services and with great pride that we give you this small financial token of our true appreciation of the work you do, and have done, to preserve our legacy for all to know and enjoy

Bruce Holsten, chairman
Plesaure Island Foundation for a Sustainable Community

 

Society Notes – August, 2013

by Darlene Bright, History Center Director

•  This month we recorded 30 members at our July Meeting. The History Center recorded 82 visitors! The gift shop took in $215.28 The History Center was used by Got-‘em-on Live and The Pleasure Island Sea Turtle Project.

•  Please welcome new members Amy Taylor, Jennifer LaFleur of Carolina Beach and Al and Lucy Kinlaw of Fayetteville also of Carolina Beach. We also added another business member, Bob McCoy of Network Realty in Carolina Beach.

•  Thanks to Sylvia Snook, and Juanita Winner for keeping the History Center open while Rebecca was on vacation!

•  Thanks to our History Center Volunteers Carl Filipiak and Ron Griffin for working on the cataloging of the subject files. That project is finally beginning to move ahead..

•  Newsletter: Thanks to Cheri McNeill for her always thorough proofing of the newsletter and Lois Taylor for her help getting the Newsletter in the mail.

You can now Purchase Wilmington Water Tours Tickets!

At the Federal Point History Center Call 910-458-0502 Or 910-338-3134

Wilmington Water Tours

Oral History — Jimmy Davis – Part 2: ‘Memories of the Boardwalk’

Interview by Ann Hertzler and Jeannie GordonOral_History-JimmyDavis_Pt4-1

[Jimmy Davis was born on March 6, 1930 here on “the Island.”  The only time he ever left was when he was in the service.]

I went to Carolina Beach School on the Boardwalk. It was a police station, city hall, and one big room, separated with sheets.

It was only about 3 classes – like 1st, 2nd, and 3rd.

And then when the beach burned down [the central business district, in 1940], so they transferred us to Myrtle Grove which is on the loop road. That was just one big room. All the grades were mixed together.

They had a sheet – like maybe some of them would be studying something here, and somebody else would be over there, but they didn’t change. One teacher taught everything. Well, I really didn’t care too much for it. I didn’t really hate it.

Like I said, we was raised up poor. And a lot of times, we’d get up and there wouldn’t be anything to eat in the house… Just didn’t want to go to school. I went there maybe till the 2nd grade and then the beach burned down. [1940 – central business district]

v20NO8August2013 FINAL PDF-006Then I went to Myrtle Grove.  Later, when the new Carolina Beach School was built, I came back and went to the Carolina Beach School for 5th grade.

After 5th grade we went to Winter Park which is in town until you went to high school.

I think it was when you left Winter Park you went into high school, but I didn’t go to high school.

School Bus 1930's

School Bus 1930’s

We rode the bus to schools off the island, the bus left about 7 o’clock. They had a cafeteria. I had to carry my lunch to Myrtle Grove and over here too. We had peanut butter and jelly or bologna. That was probably about it.

We had homework, but had just spelling, writing, and arithmetic. That was the biggest thing until I got on up to Winter Park.  And then we went into history and things like that.

My grandmother’s house was a big house and they had three cottages; and a little sidewalk and a double shower… The only air conditioning was when you opened the windows probably – that’s the way I grew up.

There was electricity and water in the kitchen and bathroom but I don’t remember anyone even having a telephone at that time. None of what was down here was air-conditioned at that time. We had a little radio we’d gather around over at my granddaddy’s at night and sit there and listen to the radio – Amos and Andy …

My grandfather was a carpenter. He built all of these places. He built that big house and 3 cottages. And he done carpentry work other places. I don’t know where all he worked.

My grandmother was a midwife. I grew up in that age when you stayed at home. Women weren’t allowed to work. But she must have gotten called out to do midwifery.

Our little house had just 2 bedrooms. From the time I remember my two older brothers was already in the service.  But I had 2 sisters that lived there, my mother and my father, and my 2 sisters and myself. I was the youngest. I’m the last one. And the last one living.

My mother had a little sha-wa-wa – a mean little sucker. It just didn’t never liked me. You’d go in the front door, the couch was setting on this side. And she’d lay right under that couch. And every time I’d come in she’d try to bite me on the foot. I bet I kicked her a million times. Not kicked her hard enough to hurt her, I just kicked her away. Cause she never liked me.

There was one policeman, and I guess there were volunteer firemen, there wasn’t any paid firemen. They didn’t even have a fire truck. They just had a two-wheel thing with hoses wrapped around it and it set right beside the school-house.

The first doctor I remember was name Dr. Jordan. I cut my leg or something. His office was right behind the drug store. And he sewed it up. I’m not sure whether it was a broken bottle or whatever. But I must have stepped on it and it come up and hit my leg and went in my leg a little bit.

As far as going to the doctor when I was young, I didn’t never have to go to no doctor. I was never sick. I did have measles one time but that’s when you had to stay in the house. They put a yellow sign on your door. The doctor had his office next to the drug store.

I tell you, around the beach at that time, you couldn’t afford to get into much trouble ‘cause everyone knew your parents. There weren’t that many people around and if you got into any trouble when you got home, everybody knew it.

We would do little things, like on Halloween, go up and knock on somebody’s door – and run; or maybe unscrew their light bulb, if they had a light bulb on the outside or something like that, but we never did anything destructive. I could get up anytime I wanted to and go up to the boardwalk in the summer time late at night if I wanted to go up there I could go.

 

From the President – August, 2013

Barry Nelder

Barry Nelder

As you may know our officers, President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer are one year terms but can be re-elected for an unlimited number of years. On the other hand our board members are elected to 2 year terms with 1⁄2 being elected each year. They can be elected for three consecutive terms (6 years) and then must sit out at least one year.

We thank ALL the people who give their time and energy to the Society. Please note that as of next year’s (2014-2015) a number of our board members will have to rotate off. PLEASE consider becoming a board member when the time comes and let Rebecca or one of the members of the nominating committee know you would like to serve.

 

 

July Election — Elected Officers and Board Members for 2013-2014

Officers: (2013-2014)
President: Barry Nelder
Vice President: Juanita Winner
Secretary: Lois Taylor
Treasurer: Demetria Sapienza

Board of Directors:
Thomas Gray (2013-105)
Skippy Winner (2013-2015)
Jim Dugan (2013-2015)
Leslie Bright (2013-2015)
Elaine Henson (2012-2014)
John Gordon (2012-2014)
Byron Moore (2012-2014)
Jean Steward (2012-2014)
Cheri McNeill (2012-2014)

Monthly Meeting Report – July, 2013

July Meeting

Nicole Morris presented an update on the recovery of the wreck of the Queen Anne’s Revenge the flagship of Blackbeard the pirate.

It was interesting to hear about the Friends of Queen Anne’s Revenge and we promised to help get the word out about this organization.

Oral History — Jimmy Davis — Part 1: ‘Memories of the Boardwalk’

Interview by Ann Hertzler and Jeannie Gordon

Carolina Beach Boardwalk

Carolina Beach Boardwalk

Jimmy Davis was born on March 6, 1930 here on “the Island.” The only time he ever left was when he was in the service.

His most vivid childhood memories are of the boardwalk.

The “Old Boardwalk” before the fire [1940].  “I remember the bowling alleys, and the old Pavilion where they had concerts on Sundays and didn’t cost you anything to go to it.”

“The way I remember the boardwalk was like I said, in the early years, I’d say ‘38 or ‘39, there was a big pavilion and they had dances upstairs and on Sunday afternoon they would have a matinee with the guys that were just coming along starting the bands. And they’d play for maybe two hours up there.

They had rides on the beach area, right up to the ocean front. Mr. Mansfield’s rides – hobby horses, Ferris wheels and all that.”

He says, “I remember the fire”

“Me and my mother walked up almost to the boardwalk there the morning of the fire and watched the beach crowd.

I remember things like that was little arcades where you could go in there and have your picture made and stuff like that but they didn’t have these electronic stuff sitting there at that time.”

Jimmy loved that boardwalk. “Some were local people but mostly from Wilmington, and maybe Wrightsville Beach. You know they had a big pavilion over there too. I remember a lot of people going from here over to there to the dances. But it burnt down when the beach burned down.”

Food was also part of the allure of the boardwalk. “We’d eat hot dogs, and doughnuts, Britts’, that was the best place on the beach at that time. There were hamburgers, and French fries. You used to could get French fries. And they had a cup like this, but it was sharp. And they would dice onions – and put a little bit of onions on top of it.”

The local kids would look for money under the boardwalk. Sometimes you might find 25 or 40 cents a day, “Some times more than that. See it was all boardwalk and it had cracks. And you’d go along in front of these restaurants and stuff like that… See a lot of them was kind of like a take out. And you’d just go to the window and order a couple of hotdogs and a drink and you would get it. Well they would drop money.”

“Naturally when they dropped it it was gone under that boardwalk. A lot of them always said they used chewing gum on the end of a stick. But I never did.

I had a little stick about like this, and round, and I split the end of it about an inch up. I’d take the back side of the stick and stand that penny or dime or 50 cent whatever it was -stand it up – and turn your stick around and go right down on that split and pull it right up. See you couldn’t get it out.

I always told them you can’t get it out with chewing gum cause it’s flat and it wouldn’t come through the crack. You’d have to get it on its side to do it. And then a lot of times you’d drop it. And if it went that way under the boards, you couldn’t see it to know where it was at. But the sure way was to have a stick with the split and just stand it up.”

Oral_History-JimmyDavis_Pt4-1Jimmy’s grandfather was a carpenter and built what is the Columbus Motel. He says, “They had that and three little cottages.”

His grandfather came to Carolina Beach from Brunswick County and his mother from Rowan County.  His maternal grandparents were Ludwigs.

Of his grandmother he says, “That’s the reason I was born on the Island. She was a licensed Midwife. Jimmy’s mother worked for the Bame Hotel. “She was over the cleaning service.”

 

Society Notes – July 2013

Darlene Bright, History Center Director

This month we recorded 40 members and guests at our June Potluck. The History Center recorded 94 visitors!  The gift shop took in $99.44  The History Center was used by Got-‘em-on Live, the Fort Fisher UDC and The Pleasure Island Sea Turtle Project.  Rebecca spoke to a summer UNCW education class about the history of Federal Point.

Please welcome new members Dennis Kabasko and Erick Merriman of Carolina Beach and Nancy Cameron McGwier also of Carolina Beach.

Thanks to Sylvia Snook, Ron Griffin and Demetria Sapienza for keeping the History Center open while Rebecca was on vacation!

Thanks to our History Center Volunteers Carl Filipiak and Ron Griffin for working on the cataloging of the subject files. That project is finally beginning to move ahead.

Newsletter: Thanks to Cheri McNeill for her always thorough proofing of the newsletter and Lois Taylor for her help getting the Newsletter in the mail.

 

You can now Purchase
Wilmington Water Tours
Tickets!
At the Federal Point History Center

Call 910-458-0502 Or 910-338-3134

Wilmington Water Tours

President’s Message – July 2013

by Barry Nelder

A huge thank-you to Dean Lambeth and the Kure Beach Town Council for approving $1,000 toward the operation of our History Center! Along with the $5,000 approved by the Carolina Beach Town Council these amounts will go a long way in keeping the History Center open for 150 days durng the 2013/2014
budget year; serving the general public, including both locals and visitors.

Nominations: We hold our annual election at the July meeting.

The Nominating Committee has proposed the following slate. Members are welcome to make other nominations from the floor at the meeting.

Officers:
President: Barry Nelder
Vice President: Juanita Winner
Secretary: Lois Taylor
Treasurer: Demetria Sapienza

Board of Directors:
Thomas Gray
Skippy Winner
Jim Dugan
Leslie Bright

Nicole Tumbleson Morris – Speaks on Blackbeard’s History

v20NO8August2013 FINAL PDF-005The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, July 17. 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Our July speaker will be Nicole Tumbleson Morris. She will update us on the current work begin done by the Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB), as they began final recovery efforts of the remains of Blackbeard’s legendary flagship. The team has uncovered incredible artifacts from cannons, anchors and ammunition to the remains of the ship herself hidden in a watery grave for almost 300 years. Each relic from the past breathes new life into the true story of Blackbeard’s reign as history’s most legendary pirate.

Ms. Morris is currently involved in creating a seven part educational web series which will take audiences along for every step of this thrilling adventure. designed to be robust and relevant, providing real world archaeological experiences to reflect the knowledge and skills our young people need for success in college and careers. Students and teachers alike will be able to experience the thrill of discovery as they follow along with our web series and learn about archaeology, conservation, history and of course, pirates!

Ms. Morris is a Maritime Archaeologist currently working for South Eastern Archaeological Services, Inc. as the Project Director and Educational Coordinator. She received a BA in History and Anthropology from the University of Florida and a MA in Anthropology (Maritime Archaeology) from the University of West Florida. Since 2002, she has participated in field research projects on 16th-century Spanish ships, Civil War blockade-runners and blockade vessels and numerous 19th-century ship loss sites. She is currently the Project Director for the Tampa Bay Historical Shipwreck Survey, which resulted in the nomination of Florida’s 12th Underwater Archaeological Preserve. She is also a certified dive instructor who teaches vocational archaeological dive classes that allow divers to participate in ongoing archaeological field research.

4th Grade Essay Contest Winner: Joey Langhorst

by: Joey Langhorst  – June, 2013 Newsletter

“I think the lighthouse foundation that was found in 2009 should be preserved by covering it with a plastic covering and then nearby showing a movie of the history of the lighthouse.

I think this is a good idea because then people can see  part of North Carolina’s culture and then find out the history.  This could be a way to raise money for endangered species and future projects. Plus tons of people will have another tourist attraction to visit just in case they get bored of the other attractions. To make this possible there needs to be space to build the theater and luckily there’s a ton of space in Fort Fisher (that is available to use!)

Also it seems like this is a good idea because authors and historians have a really accurate place they can find information on the Federal Point Lighthouse. The completion of this idea could even lead to an ordinary kid growing up and then becoming a historian. To make this even better the keeper’s house foundation could be covered with plastic (that is not touching the foundation.)  

A small model of the lighthouse could also be made so people can see what it looked like.  This would definitely attract locals, tourists, historians, authors, and other people, too.”