March Meeting: Celebration of our 25th Anniversary

Monday, February 18, 2019  – 7:30 PM

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, March 18, 2019, at 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Federal Point Historic Preservation Society
Founded March 28, 1994

Join us for a trip down memory lane as our founding members talk about the early years of the Society.

There will be special refreshments and time to talk about all the projects the Society has been involved with over the years.

      Newton Homesite and Cemetery

Beauregard Shipwreck Overlook

Sedgeley Abbey

President’s Letter — March, 2019

By Elaine Henson

FPHPS 25th Anniversary, Gazebo/Picnic Shelter

This month we celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Federal Point Historic Preservation Society.  The organization was incorporated on March 28, 1994.  In those early days the Society met at various places including Fort Fisher State Historic Site, but after a few years they were eyeing the gazebo/picnic shelter next to the Town Hall complex in the 1100 block of North Lake Park Boulevard.

The Town of Carolina Beach had purchased the former Blockade Runner Museum in 1989 to remodel and expand into the present day town complex.  The property included a replica of a 19th Century open air public market which was used as a picnic shelter for school groups and visitors to the museum.

In the late 1990s, FPHPS approached the town about converting the picnic shelter into a meeting space.  After a couple of years, the town gave the go ahead and the fund raising and gathering of materials began.

There were generous donations from many individuals from the Federal Point area, Wilmington and New Hanover County.  Many donated money, materials, services, talents and man hours.  Just to name a few, the HVAC was donated by Taylor Heating and Air; M & M Plumbing donated their labor and got a vendor to donate fixtures; EWE Electrical donated their labor; Hanover Iron Works donated the shingles and Lowes gave a discount on all the building materials and other purchases.

Many organizations donated their time such as the Junior Sorosis who donated and installed the ceiling tiles and the North Carolina Aquarium employees who helped with the display cases.  FPHPS members, their families and other volunteers worked tirelessly to complete enclosing the picnic shelter and adding a 16-foot addition to the back to make the almost 1600 square foot History Center.

Upon completion they held a grand opening celebration on March 30, 2001.  The guest speaker was Lisbeth Evans, Secretary of North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

 

The Early Years of Federal Point History Center

The 1990s

♦  June 22, 1994: First Speaker, Catherine Bishir of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Historic Preservation Section

♦  October 21, 22, 23, 1994: First fundraiser “Ocean Plaza Ballroom Blast” Featuring Chicken Hicks

♦  Fall 1994: First Newsletter, editor Sandy Jackson

Ballroom Blast, 1994

♦  December 1994 – October 1995: First Preservation Campaign – Protection and preservation of the historic plantation ruins of  Sedgeley Abbey

♦  March 1995: Lighthouse logo, created by Martin Peebles, adopted

♦  Spring 1995: Agreement with Town of Carolina Beach for the construction of the Beauregard Shipwreck Overlook

♦  April 1995: Bingo fundraiser

♦  Spring 1995: Ocean Plaza and Joy Lee Apartments nominated to the National Register of Historic Places

♦  July 1995: Fort Fisher Revetment Project, advocacy, support, and ground breaking

♦  October 20-22, 1995: Second Annual Ocean Plaza Reunion

♦  Received $10,000 grant from North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources for compiling an inventory of known historic sites and cartographic inventory of Federal Point, directed by Sandy Jackson

♦  May 26, 1996: Hosted a celebration marking the 50th Anniversary of the Ocean Plaza Building. Wilmington Concert Band performed, followed by a fashion show in keeping with the original opening in 1946

♦  August 18, 1996: Participated in Belk “Preservation Celebration” fundraiser

♦  June 22, 1997: Oakdale Cemetery guided tour by E. F. “Gene” Risley Jr.

Beauregard Shipwreck Overlook

♦  Saturday October 18, 1997: Barbeque fundraiser

♦  November 15, 1997: Traditional Holiday Decorating Workshop, hosted by Fort Fisher State Historic Site, with demonstrations by staff members of Tryon Palace

♦  February, 1998: First Cookbook

♦  February, 1998: House Plaque Committee was formed and drafted guidelines for plaquing historic buildings

♦  March 1998: Published Monuments & Markers of Federal Point, North Carolina compiled by Sandy Jackson

♦  May, 1998: Fundraiser: Raffle of framed art print of the Federal Point Lighthouse by Kay Robbins

♦  Summer, 1998: Entered into an agreement with MOTSU to maintain, prepare signage and protect the Newton Homesite and Graveyard. Work began with construction of a wooden fence

♦  September, 1998: The first historic plaques were awarded to the Loughlin Cottage, Burnett Beach Cottage, and Ocean Plaza Ballroom, all over 50 years old and of significance to the community

♦  December 5, 1998: “Down East” Barbecue fundraiser

Newton Homesite and Cemetery

♦  February, 1999 – Entered into a lease with the Town of Carolina Beach for the Gazebo structure to be converted into the Federal Point History Center

♦  April 1999: Sugar Loaf Battle marker moved from Dow Rd. to Federal Point History Center

♦  May, 1999: First Student Essay Contest open to fifth grade classes at Carolina Beach Elementary School was won by Waverly Jones

♦  May 23, 1999: First fundraising Cruise – Aboard Pirate IV

♦  June 27, 1999: Commemorative Ceremony held celebrating the listing of Newton Homesite and Graveyard in the National Register of Historic Places

♦  October 22, 1999: Ground breaking for renovation of the Gazebo structure to become the Federal Point History Center

 

The Story of Blackbeard’s Shipwreck: Queen Anne’s Revenge

by Nancy Gadzuk

Mark Wilde-Ramsing, former Director of the Underwater Archaeology Unit at Fort Fisher, spoke at the January 21, 2019 meeting of the Federal Point Historic Preservation Society.

 

Mark and Leslie Bright, Director of the History Center, worked together as a team for many years at Fort Fisher, and the Underwater Archaeology Unit there is the oldest in the country. Mark spoke on The Story of Blackbeard’s Shipwreck: Queen Anne’s Revenge. He was also promoting his new book, Blackbeard’s Sunken Prize: The 300-Year Voyage of Queen Anne’s Revenge.

Edward Teach, better known as the pirate Blackbeard, was notorious in the early 1700’s, a prime time for privateers and pirates.

In 1717 he commandeered the French frigate the Concorde and renamed it Queen Anne’s Revenge. Fast and well-armed, it became Blackbeard’s flagship, and he and his crew stole as much bounty as they could from other less notorious privateers and pirates.

But not for too long, as Blackbeard ran the ship aground in 1718 outside of Beaufort, North Carolina, possibly to evade capture by the British. There the ship sat underwater until the wreckage was discovered in 1997.

It took almost ten years of environmental review and geological research to determine if bringing up these relics from the past was important enough to warrant disrupting the ocean floor. Apparently it was.

Full recovery took from 2006 to 2015, as salt and water made recovering artifacts difficult. Each item had to be kept wet until it could be cleaned, documented, and preserved in a laboratory. More than 400,000 artifacts were recovered, including pieces of fine glassware, jewelry, intricate weapons, pewter plates, medical tools, and more.

These artifacts came from all around the world: England, France, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, China, and Africa. Thirty cannons were also recovered, which explains how Queen Anne’s Revenge was able to amass such a trove of riches in only six months.

Leg shackles were also recovered, suggesting that Blackbeard and his crew may have been slave traders as well as upscale, high-end thieves.

Mark shared pictures of some of the artifacts from the recovery and entertained a short question and answer before signing copies of the book he’d brought and made available for sale.

 

December Meeting – Christmas Potluck

Monday, December 17, 2018

6:30 pm – One Hour Early!

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, December 17, 2018 at 6:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its annual holiday potluck on Monday, December 17 at 6:30 pm.  This year we will be back at the History Center as it’s a lot easier for the hospitality committee. Please join us for food, fun and festivities.

Again this year Judge Jay Hockenbury and his wife Deborah, will have another trivia contest for us and a timely Christmas story.

John Golden will round out the evening with his wonderful Christmas sing-along.

Holiday Shopping – FPHPS Gift Shop

 

Local Flavor - CookbookDoes everyone in your extended family have one of our Local Flavor Cookbooks?  How about friend and neighbors!

At $25.00 it’s the perfect homegrown gift for every cook you know. It is full of “cookable” recipes mostly built from ingredients you already have in your pantry or can pick up at any local grocery store.  And, it has a section with historic highlights of well known restaurants of Federal Point.

Don’t forget our t-shirts are a real bargain at  $12.00 each..  We’ve got plenty of the Society shirts in every size and color.  We’re also well stocked with the Ocean Plaza BIRTHPLACE of the SHAG shirts.  Anyone with a history of the Boardwalk would love this reflection of  our history.

Books, Books, Books! We have lots of books that relate to the history and culture of our area.  The two most important are Elaine Henson’s Carolina Beach in Postcards and Brenda Coffey’s new Images of America: Kure Beach.  Both are well researched and would be a great present to anyone who’s interested in the history of our local area.

Carolina Beach in PostcardsCarolina Beach, North Carolina, has been a destination for beachgoers, boaters, and fishermen since the 1880s. Visitors came first by the combination of river steamers and a train and later by automobiles to seek respite from the summer’s heat and the daily grind. This book shares the history of this seaside community through the postcards its visitors sent home. From the early hand colored cards printed in Germany to the modern chrome cards of today, we see the people and places of Carolina Beach.

Kure Beach derived its name from a Danish immigrant named Hans Anderson Kure, Sr. He began acquiring land in the area in 1891, and  by 1900, he had purchased 900 acres just south of Carolina Beach to Fort Fisher.

He established the Kure Land and Development Company and in 1913 produced a map of Fort Fisher Sea Beach, which would later become Kure’s Beach and eventually Kure Beach. In 1923, the first wooden fishing pier on the Atlantic coast was constructed by Lawrence Kure.

DAN PRI, one of the first surfboard companies on the East Coast, was also established at Kure Beach.

The area is rich in historical significance from Verrazzano’s discovery to Cape Fear Indians, pirates, lighthouses, the “Rocks,” the Ethel Dow Chemical Plant and the community’s role in both the Civil War and World War II.

 

Tooting Our Own Horn?

By Elaine Henson

Several months ago, we were asked to present a program on our Historical Society by the Kiwanis Club in Wilmington for their monthly meeting.  Don’t know why we had not thought of doing that before, but we got a program together and presented it at their August meeting. A few days after that we were invited to come to the Wilmington Civitan Club meeting in September and then by the Men’s Breakfast Group at Carolina Beach Presbyterian in October.

On January 8, 2019, we will be presenting a shorter version at the Carolina Beach Town Council Meeting having been invited by Mayor Joe Benson.  So, it seems that we have taken our show on the road.

The presentation begins with an overview of who we are, where we are, what we do and what we collect.  It talks about our monthly meetings, our exhibits, our newsletter, our special programs like the Historic Boardwalk Tour, and our awesome website that has so much of our archives online.

Then, there are two short history lessons.  One is about the beginning of Carolina Beach as a resort in the early1880s, the Winners, Capt. John Harper, the Steamers and Shoo Fly train, first Pavilion, etc.  The other is how our Federal Point Peninsula became an island with the coming of the Intracoastal Waterway 1926-1932.

If you know of an organization that has monthly meetings or any group that looks for programs, please tell them about us.  We would love to visit them!

 

Society Notes – December, 2018

By Darlene Bright, History Center Director 

Thanks to Steve Arthur for doing our Boardwalk tour for a group of local Island Women!

 

  • The History Center recorded 80 visitors in November. There were 36 people in attendance at the November meeting. The History Center was used by the Got-Em-On Live Bait Fishing Club, Step Up for Soldiers, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC).
  • And don’t forget!! If you take a trip with Wilmington Water Tours, please tell them you are a member of the FPHPS!  If you do, we get a portion of your ticket price.  Call us at 910-458-0502 or them at 910-338-3134.  wilmingtonwatertours.net
  • Welcome to new member, Roger Brix from Wilmington.
  • Thanks to John Gregory for taking great pictures of the walking tour for the Island Women.
  • Thanks to our volunteers in November; James Kohler, Andre Blouin, Steve Arthur, Darlene Bright and Leslie Bright. Refreshments were provided by Steve Arthur and Cheri McNeill. Nancy Gadzuk has graciously agreed to take minutes at the meetings until we find a Secretary.
  • Rebecca, Cheri and Darlene greatly appreciate Andre Blouin’s help getting the November newsletter laid up and posted on our web site!!!
  • Thanks so much to Juanita Winner’s grandson, Skylar Slaughter, who volunteered for us this month. He helped decorate the History Center for Christmas. Also, he washed the windows and help neaten everything up.

 

Congratulations to Judge Jay Hockenbury on his retirement from the bench after almost 24 years of distinguished service.

FPHPS Awards Price Cottage Plaque

On Saturday, November 3, 2018, Federal Point Historic Preservation Society had a ceremony to award a plaque for the Price Cottage built in 1939 by Grover Cleveland Price and his wife, Tessie Price, of Rocky Mount.

It is located at 405 Carolina Beach Avenue North.  The cottage is now owned by Mrs. Price’s grandchildren, Susan Harris Gibbs, Danny Harris and Roney Harris.  Susan Gibbs and her daughter, Lauren Gibbs, completed the application for the plaque and wrote a story of the cottage.  Ned Barnes, a business member of FPHPS, provided the deed research which is required.

The ceremony was attended by members of the Price family, President, Board and Members of FPHPS, Mayor Joe Benson, Council Members LeAnn Pierce and Tom Bridges.  The family had a reception in the dining room on a table built by the builder of the cottage, Mr. Ira Hines.

Anyone with a house in the Federal Point area that is at least 50 years old is eligible for a plaque.  Houses 50 to 74 years old have a black band around the plaque, 75 years or older has a gold band.  Call or stop by the History Center and we can give you a packet with an application and directions.  The fee is $100 which is the cost of the plaque.

 

July Meeting – Andrew Duppstadt on Pirates, Privateers, and Commerce Raiders

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, July 16, 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

This month our speaker is Andrew Duppstadt who will speak on “North Carolina’s Naval Raiders, 1700-1865.”

Throughout much of North Carolina’s early history, naval raiding was practiced by pirates, privateers, blockade runners, and commerce raiders. Though often overshadowed by other colonies or states, the Old North State was home to some of the most prolific naval raiders during their prospective periods of history.

This program examines some of the men who undertook the practice of naval raiding, which brought them relative levels of fame during their time.

Andrew is the Program Development and Training Officer, and Historic Weapons Program Coordinator for North Carolina Division of State Historic Sites, North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. He has a BA and MA in history from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.  He is the Assistant Curator of Education for the North Carolina Division of State Historic Sites.  He also serves as an Adjunct Instructor of History at Coastal Carolina Community College and Craven Community College.