From the President – August, 2017

By Elaine Henson

Many of you have undoubtedly heard the news about the ocean front Carolina Surf Condominium at 102 Carolina Beach Avenue South being condemned.  It seems that the four story, 28 unit condo built in 1986 has a “lack of structural integrity” with metal support beams corroded to half their original size. It got me thinking about what was at that location before the Carolina Surf was built.

For several summers in the 1980s our family rented a cottage right across the street from the Accordion Motel which was then at that address.  The Accordion was a large 2 story, “U-shaped” building with asbestos shingling.  The rear rooms faced the ocean with a pool in the center of the U as seen in this post card from the 1950s.

The picture taken by renowned Wilmington photographer John Kelly, whose studio/home was at Third and Greenfield Streets near Greenfield Lake.  Note the guests sitting on blankets, folding aluminum chairs with woven webbing didn’t become popular on the beach until the 60s.

You can also see a rock jetty beside the motel.  Jetties, made from rocks or creosote poles, were used in a futile attempt to keep the sand from washing away back then.

The motel had 30 pine paneled rooms and baths all “cross ventilated” which is good because I don’t see any window units.  It was owned and operated by Alice and John Washburn who advertised that it was “Just a wee bit nicer” and later “Just a wee bit better”.

John William Washburn was an accomplished accordion player and loved to sit on the porch and play. He decided to name his motel for this unusual feature so guests wouldn’t forget the name or his nightly serenade.

John was also the mayor of Carolina Beach from 1959 to 1961.  The Washburns later sold the motel to Ree and Jackie Glisson who put in air conditioning units, enlarged the pool to 48 feet and made other improvements.  This card shows it under their ownership. The Glissons operated it for several years before it was sold and torn down to make way for the Carolina Surf.

 

‘American Routes’ Sea Breeze Beach

Seabreeze Resort

Each week, American Routes brings you the songs and stories that describe both the community origins of our music, musicians and cultures — the “roots”— and the many directions they take over time — the “routes.”

This week (July 19 – 26, 2017), we travel to Sea Breeze Beach in North Carolina.

In the late 19th century African American beach communities emerged along the East Coast as havens for black vacationers excluded from white beaches.

Sea Breeze provided summertime leisure to African Americans throughout the Jim Crow era and became one of the few integrated places where blacks and whites could hang out, hear music, and dance together.

Nick Spitzer talks to Elder Alfred Mitchell and Brenda Freeman about their summer memories of Sea Breeze before white developers claimed ownership of the beach.

Enjoy the full program (11:22) at americanroutes.org.

 

 

Gil Burnett – Memories of the Carolina Beach Boardwalk

Click image – to view images & videos

Want to take a walk along the new and improved Carolina Beach Boardwalk?

And learn something about its history from master storyteller and long-time resident Gil Burnett while you’re there?

Click the image or follow this link to a series of pictures from a recent History Center walk with the retired Chief Justice Court Judge. Click or tap on any image in the photo series to view images in full screen mode.

Video clips capture Gil’s experience as a 12-year-old setting up a successful sno-ball operation on the Boardwalk and provide some background on the evolution of shagging in Carolina Beach.

See you on the Boardwalk!

 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! Tuesday Evenings

Family Night on the Boardwalk

Our Society will be participating in “Family Night on the Boardwalk” this summer. We will have a table with our brochures and information on the history of Carolina Beach and the Boardwalk behind the stage on Cape Fear Blvd.  

We need volunteers to sit at the table and talk to people from 6:30 to 8:30 Tuesday evenings beginning July 18 and running through August.

Please call  the History Center at 910-458-0502 to let us know which Tuesday you can work.

Chefs of the Coast: Restaurants and Recipes from the North Carolina Coast

By Nancy Gadzuk

John Batchelor, food critic and author of Chefs of the Coast, Restaurants and Recipes from the North Carolina Coast was the featured speaker at the May 2017 History Center meeting.

He spoke on his experiences as a restaurant reviewer for newspapers in both Winston-Salem and Greensboro and as a judge of restaurant cooking competitions throughout Western North Carolina.

These experiences led him to write first , Chefs of the Mountains with recipes and stories from some of the restaurants he’d visited there.

To some people (like me), John’s would be a dream job: sampling delicious food, hearing the chefs’ and restaurateurs’ stories of how they got into the business, learning at least some of their secrets and recipes, finding out where their ingredients come from, and compiling these experiences into a beautifully photographed collection to be shared with others.

Apparently John thought so too, and he began work on Chefs of the Coast. One of the things he learned in his first book was that refining recipes that are meant to serve fifty down to recipes that serve four is not so easy.

Based on feedback he’d gotten on his earlier book, he also knew readers wanted simpler recipes and that some relatively inexpensive restaurants needed to be included. Seventeen Wilmington and Southport restaurants are represented in the book, which leans heavily toward the Outer Banks.

He said the key to pulling everything together came from his interviews, where a line or two would stand out and inform the focus of the entire segment. For example, “If it’s white – rice, flour, sugar – don’t eat it,” is John’s own food mantra.

He acknowledged that many home cooks can prepare a meal that’s every bit as tasty as what a top chef prepares, but for two or four people rather than a restaurant full of people all wanting different meals.

John’s line that stood out for me was this: The traditional chef’s hat has one hundred folds in it, signifying that a good chef should be able to cook an egg one hundred different ways, from memory.

Bon appetit!

 

 

Family Night on the Boardwalk

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Our Society will be participating in “Family Night on the Boardwalk” this summer.

We will have a table with our brochures and information on the history of Carolina Beach and the Boardwalk behind the stage on Cape Fear Blvd.  

We need volunteers to sit at the table and talk to people from 6:30 to 8:30 beginning June 13 and running through August. Please call  the History Center at 910-458-0502 to let us know which Tuesday you can work.

Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce – Family Night on the Boardwalk 

 

April Meeting – Carolina Beach Then and Now

Presented by Elaine B. Henson

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, April 17, 7:30 p.m. at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Elaine’s presentation will look at buildings, businesses and places at Carolina Beach from the past and what is in that same location now.  In some cases, we also see what was there in between.

This trip down memory lane begins just before coming over the Snow’s Cut Bridge and continues along Lake Park Boulevard to the Carolina Beach Lake.

 

 

From the President – April, 2017

By Elaine Henson

Carolina Beach Hotel, Part IV

The Carolina Beach Hotel opened on June 4, 1926, it was destroyed by fire on September 13, 1927, and its’ owners were acquitted of arson charges on January 20, 1928. In a year and a half, the hotel’s story had come to an end.  The city block bordered by South Fourth and Fifth Streets, Atlanta Avenue and Clarendon Boulevard sat empty for the next ten years.

In January, 1938, construction began on the Carolina Beach School in the same city block where the hotel had been.  Another similarity was that the builder of the new school, W.A. Simon, also built the hotel.

Until 1916 Carolina Beach elementary students attended a school near the river in the area where Dow Road and Henniker’s Ditch are located. Katie Burnett Hines was the principal of that school that burned in 1916.

After that the pupils were bused to Myrtle Grove School near Myrtle Grove Road with the promise that the school board would build a new school on the beach.  About 70 Carolina Beach students went back to the beach for the 1937-38 school year. They used a temporary school located on the boardwalk and called, appropriately, the Boardwalk School.

Carolina Beach School – Class of 1937-1938

Carolina Beach School – Class of 1937-1938

There were two classrooms: one for grades 1-3 and the other for grades 4-6. The rooms were separated by a sheet hanging from the ceiling. It was located near Britt’s Donuts present location.

You can see our late member, Ryder Lewis, in this photo of the fourth, fifth and sixth grades from that 1937-38 Boardwalk School.  He is on the third row, second from the left.  (click image) The late Juanita Bame Herring is on the same row, fourth from left.  You can tell this was post WWI, pre-WWII, and at a time when boys were crazy about planes from all the aviator caps in the photo.

The new school on South Fourth Street was begun in early January of 1938.  It had an auditorium and four classrooms.  You can see how quickly it went up from this mid- February picture from the Sunday Star News.

In April, 1938, the New Hanover Board of Elections made plans to move Federal Point’s polling place to Carolina Beach School since 70% of the voters lived south of Snow’s Cut.  Previously they had voted at Robinson’s Store on Carolina Beach Road.

New Hanover Schools Superintendent, H.M. Roland announced that 105 students were enrolled when the school opened in fall of 1938. Mrs. Madge Woods Bell was principal the first year.  She moved away the summer of 1939 and was replaced by Mrs. C.G. Van Landingham who was still there when the first of several additions was added in 1941.

Carolina Beach School celebrated its 75th birthday in 2013. [This is the only image we have of the early school.  If any of you have a photo we would love to scan it for our archives.]

Carolina Beach Hotel:   Part I    Part II    Part III
Oral History – Isabel Lewis Foushee: ‘School Memories’