Larry Cecil Bame

Larry Cecil Bame          June 8, 1939 – September 10, 2014
Son of the late James Cecil “Mike” Bame and Alice Bame who survives.MikeBame&family1951

 

FPHPS and Carolina Beach have lost a native son in the death of Larry Bame. He was the grandson of James Rowan and Amanda “Mandy” Ludwig Bame who came to Carolina Beach in the mid-1920s from Barber, NC eventually opening a café.  This marked the beginning of the Bame family’s relationship with Carolina Beach.  It would grow to include several beach businesses, hotels, piers, restaurants, two Carolina Beach mayors, a fire chief and span four generations.

Larry had deep roots as a Carolina Beach boy and grew up working summers at the Bame Hotel and other family businesses where he met his wife, Doris.  She was from Rowan County and also had a summer job working in the hotel dining room.

He was a quiet, unassuming and introspective man who could be overlooked, yet those who made the effort to know him found that he had much wisdom to share on meaningful aspects of life. Larry had a small and successful tool and die shop here on the island and was a faithful and loving husband to Doris, father to Melissa and Jeffrey and grandfather to his three grandsons.

He saw a lot of progress and changes to our beach community in his 75 years and could tell wonderful stories about growing up and living here. He was quite a guy in his own way and will be sorely missed by all who knew and loved him.

 

Bame: A Family Affair

Originally published in Snow’s Cut Monthly, September, 2009

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society is posting this article in honor and memory of Larry Bame who died September 10, 2014.  Larry was a 3rd generation Carolina Beach Bame and contributed to this article.

By Elaine B. Henson

Starting with a seasonal café and gas station, coupled with big dreams and hard work, J. R. Bame built a small empire making a year round living for himself and some of his eleven children.

Bame Family

Bame Family
Larry Bame (front row, far left); Joyce Knox McLaughlin (front row, 3rd from left); Ruby Bame Knox (3rd row, far left); J. R. Bame (back row, 2nd from right); Mandy Bame (2nd row, 2nd from right); Rachel Bame (furthest on right)

This story was originally dedicated to the memory of Ruby Bame Knox who died on August 11, 2009 at the age of 96. Ruby was the last survivor of the eleven children born to J.R. and Mandy Bame and was interviewed for this story in January, 2009. She made her home in Carolina Beach until the year 2000 when she moved to Salisbury to be near her daughter, Joyce.

The images for this story were provided by the author, Doris and Larry Bame and Joyce Knox McLaughlin.

At the beginning of the 20th century James Rowan Bame and Amanda “Mandy” Ludwig Bame began their life together as a young married couple. They lived in Salisbury, North Carolina in Rowan County and later moved to a small nearby town called Barber. There, J. R. opened a general store by the railroad tracks. Some time later he built a cotton gin in Barber and another gin in Bear Poplar which was close by. A few years later he added a café to the general store.

J. R. and Mandy Bame had eleven children born from 1905 to 1929. Summers would find the young Bame family at Carolina Beach visiting Mandy’s parents, J.O. and Laura Ludwig. The Ludwigs had moved to Carolina Beach after J. O. retired as a builder in Salisbury. They operated a rooming house on Cape Fear Boulevard just west of Lake Park Boulevard.

Bame's Hotel MenuBy the mid 20s J. R. Bame decided to open a café and gasoline station at the beach and stay all summer with his family. Improved roads and automobiles or “machines” had replaced the river steamer and train way of coming to the beach. In the season, there were hundreds of autos bringing thousands of beach goers to Carolina Beach and J. R. decided to capitalize on the growing beach community.

An article in the Wilmington New Dispatch dated June 10, 1926 stated:

The dining room of J.R. Bame’s located on Cape Fear Boulevard, Carolina Beach, known as “Bame’s Café” was officially opened during the first of the week, owing to the incessant demands for some dining hall being operated early in the season. Mr. Bame had one of the best locations on the beach and in conjunction with his café operates a confectionery.

His dining room is spacious, neat and screened and conveniently located near the dance casino [Note: The Pavilion]. A complete line of soft drinks, candies, “pop-cycles” and other confectioneries were available.

The only gasoline filling station located on Carolina Beach is owned and operated by Mr. Bame, near the center of the resort.

Ruby Bame Knox, daughter of J. R. and Mandy, remembered the “pop-cycles” well; she said they made by them by putting a scoop of ice cream on a stick and dipping it in chocolate. She also remembered heading to the beach when school was out each summer. Making the trip with such a large family was quite a fete. The youngest children and their parents piled into the large sedan with pull out seats. The older children came in pick up trucks which were loaded with luggage and supplies.

 

Bame Hotel KeyBAME’S HOTEL
In spite of the Great Depression and stock market crash in 1929, J.R. Bame revealed plans to build a hotel at Carolina Beach in the spring of 1930. Bame’s Hotel was beside his café in the first block of Cape Fear Boulevard and opened in June.

It boasted 33 comfortable rooms with running water, tubs and showers. It was a three- story hotel with a white wooden exterior and was modern in every detail.   And with “Miss Mandy” supervising the cooking, the new dining room was overflowing with diners.

Bames Hotel - Opened June 1930

The first Bame Hotel opened in June of 1930 and was built by James Rowan Bame from Barber, North Carolina. It stood on the first block of Cape Fear Boulevard, had a white wooden exterior and had 33 rooms.

According to Ruby Bame Knox, who was a rising high school senior that first summer the hotel opened, most people stayed at least a week or two. Ruby worked at the front desk and waited tables in the dining room. She also babysat for her older brothers and sister who had families of their own by now. She used to take her nieces and nephews under the pavilion (which was on pilings in the front) so they could be in the shade and play in the sand. Her older brother George Bame came every summer to help her parents run the hotel.

The 1935 remodeled and enlarged Hotel Bame is featured on this postcard. It had a brick exterior, 60 rooms, a dining room and a grill that faced the boardwalk. It was destroyed in the September 19, 1940 fire which also leveled two blocks of the boardwalk.

The 1935 remodeled and enlarged Hotel Bame is featured on this postcard. It had a brick exterior, 60 rooms, a dining room and a grill that faced the boardwalk. It was destroyed in the September 19, 1940 fire which also leveled two blocks of the boardwalk.

By the mid 30s J. R Bame had decided to remodel and enlarge the hotel. The end result was a bricked exterior with 60 rooms.

There was a large paneled dining room in the hotel along with a grill that fronted on the boardwalk. The family stayed in rooms on the first floor during the summer but returned to Barber in the fall for the school year and the family businesses there.

An inside glimpse of one of the 60 bedrooms of the remodeled 1935 Hotel Bame shows two large windows with the bed in between. One can just imagine the sounds of the rolling surf and cool breezes. Guests had a lavatory for convenience since the bathroom was down the hall.

An inside glimpse of one of the 60 bedrooms of the remodeled 1935 Hotel Bame shows two large windows with the bed in between. One can just imagine the sounds of the rolling surf and cool breezes. Guests had a lavatory for convenience since the bathroom was down the hall.

Eventually J. R. and Mandy moved permanently to Carolina Beach. Their first house was on Charlotte Street. For their 50th anniversary the Bames built a large comfortable brick house at 714 Cape Fear Boulevard. Later their son Ernest and his wife Rachel lived there too.

This postcard shows the Hotel Bame rebuilt after the 1940 fire. It had 80 rooms, 65 with their own bath. This hotel and its predecessors were located on what is now the vacant lot between the Marriott and the Gazebo.

This postcard shows the Hotel Bame rebuilt after the 1940 fire. It had 80 rooms, 65 with their own bath. This hotel and its predecessors were located on what is now the vacant lot between the Marriott and the Gazebo.

Hurricanes are not the only disasters in Carolina Beach history. A devastating boardwalk fire on the night of September 19, 1940 ranks near the top. The fire began in the pavilion on the boardwalk and swept two blocks south destroying every building in its path including the Bame Hotel. The sprinkler system installed by J. R. Bame was rendered useless when power was cut to the boardwalk area, so the hotel burned to the ground.

“Mr. Jim”, as J. R. was often called, and the other business owners vowed to rebuild and be open in time for the summer season of 1941 and they did. The fact that they were able to rebuild two entire blocks from ashes in just a few months earned Carolina Beach the nickname “The South’s Miracle Beach”.

The new brick three story Bame Hotel boasted eighty rooms; sixty five of those rooms had their own bath. The hotel floors were tile on the first level and hardwood on the second and third floors. Red leather chairs graced the spacious lobby. The new Bame also had an elevator, a dining room and a grill that was open extra hours.

This postcard shows the Hotel Bame, rebuilt in 1941, with the Bame Esso Service Station and Grocery next door. The station and grocery was run by J. C. “Mike” Bame. It started as just a station, later they added the grocery store and a second story with rooms to rent. Eventually another two story building was added to the back that housed apartments. This building still stands on Cape Fear Blvd. and was most recently used as the Sterling Craft Mall.

This postcard shows the Hotel Bame, rebuilt in 1941, with the Bame Esso Service Station and Grocery next door. The station and grocery was run by J. C. “Mike” Bame. It started as just a station, later they added the grocery store and a second story with rooms to rent. Eventually another two story building was added to the back that housed apartments. This building still stands on Cape Fear Blvd. and was most recently used as the Sterling Craft Mall.

 

SECOND GENERATION BAMES
Some of the eleven Bame children were settling at the beach, raising families and beginning to make their mark. In 1942, Ruby, her husband Jim Knox moved to the beach year round. Ruby’s brother Ernest, who was also called “Tite”, had the Gulf service station across the street from the hotel.

Bame Dining Room Menu 1941

A menu from the dining room in 1941.

World War II took Ernest away to serve in the Army Air Force and in his absence Jim Knox managed the station. When the war ended, Jim and Ernest became partners and also opened at hardware and appliance store next to the Gulf Station.

[Ernest’s son, Phil Bame, continues the business as Bame’s Ace Hardware on Lake Park Boulevard]

J. C. “Mike” Bame, another brother, ran the Esso (at other times Pure and Texaco) station and grocery store also on Cape Fear between the Bame Hotel and the Greystone Hotel. Juanita Bame Herring and her husband Alan ran the grill at the Fisherman’s Steel Pier and later the restaurant at the Center Pier. Eldest brother, George, continued to come every summer to run the hotel.

Ernest and Mike Bame both served as mayors of Carolina Beach in the 50s and 60s. Mike was also the fire chief, a volunteer position, and had a parking place reserved for the chief in front of his station and grocery store.

Mike’s son, Larry Bame, helped out at the station and store growing up at the beach. He was a soda jerk at the hotel grill and later worked at the Fisherman’s Steel Pier built by his father and grandfather and John Fergus in 1953. The pier was 1000 feet long and located just off the boardwalk south of the Bame Hotel.  Larry also remembers a pool room and barber shop in the hotel.

 

Hurricane Hazel
Larry Bame will never forget the morning of October 15, 1954. He rose early and rode his bicycle over the Snow’s Cut Bridge to go squirrel hunting. Soon after, high winds and rain sent him back over the steel swing bridge where he could see the ocean over the dunes…a sight he had never seen before. Upon reaching the family home on Charlotte Avenue, his mother Alice sent him straight to the grocery store next to the hotel to help his father and grandfather get the merchandise off the floor since a hurricane was coming.

Larry remembers seeing the ocean lapping over the steel pier when he arrived and the streets filled with water. They worked furiously to save as much as they could from the rising water which reached a height of almost two feet in the store. Larry, his father and grandfather were never able to go home until the hurricane was over.

Across the street, Ernest Bame and Jim Knox weathered the storm in the Gulf station and appliance store. Ernest’s wife, Rachel Bame, remembers seeing refrigerators and other appliances floating in the store the next day. The Bame’s water damaged hotel and stores were still standing after Hazel, unlike most buildings all over the beach.

The Fisherman’s Steel Pier, built in 1953, was just off the boardwalk and south of the Bame Hotel. The pier enjoyed only one season before being severely damaged in Hurricane Hazel. It was rebuilt and later the popular Skyliner ride was added. (picture - 1964) The pier remained until more hurricane damage forced its demolition in the 1970s.

The Fisherman’s Steel Pier, built in 1953, was just off the boardwalk and south of the Bame Hotel. The pier enjoyed only one season before being severely damaged in Hurricane Hazel. It was rebuilt and later the popular Skyliner ride was added. (picture – 1964) The pier remained until more hurricane damage forced its demolition in the 1970s.

But, the steel pier suffered badly and was shortened by 200 feet. Hurricane Hazel, the only category 4 hurricane to hit our area in all of the twentieth century, had come in on a lunar high tide leaving a swath of damage you had to see to believe.

After Hazel’s repairs, a cable car ride was installed at the Fisherman’s Steel Pier called the Skyliner.  The Skyliner took riders high in the air over the pier and was a huge success for a few years. The pier was again the victim of hurricanes in the 70s and was finally torn down.

“Mr. Jim” and a partner also built the Center Pier in Wilmington Beach. The pier’s restaurant was a popular place for lunch and dinner meetings for many civic organizations at the beach and was renowned for their seafood.

[In 1996 Hurricanes Bertha and Fran destroyed most of Center Pier and what remains is now the popular Tiki Bar at the Ocean Grill].

J. R. Bame died in 1959. His son George continued to manage the hotel until his death in 1968. The family leased it for a couple of years after that and finally sold to investors from Myrtle Beach in the early 70s.

They tore it down and built a water slide in its place. It marked the end of the Bame Hotel but the family continues to be a part of the Carolina Beach community into the 21st century.

[The hotel and its predecessors were located on what is now the vacant lot between the Marriott and the Gazebo.]

SCM

 

Norm Melton – Growing Up On the Boardwalk

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, September 15, 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Carolina Beach BoardwalkThis month’s speaker will be Norm Melton, a retired teacher.  Norm grew up around his mother’s gift shop. Marie Melton operated her gift shop on the Boardwalk from 1946-1971.

Harper Ave - CB - Mid 1960'sNorm was in elementary school when they arrived and graduated with the Carolina Beach Elementary School class of 1964.

He went on to graduate from New Hanover High and UNCW as well as getting a Master’s Degree from East Carolina.

Norm taught marketing over a long career that concluded with retirement from North Brunswick High.

Mr. Melton will present a variety of topics taken from his own experiences in the 1950’s and 1960’s and hopes to encourage discussion and additional memories among our “old timers” in attendance. It will be sort of “homecoming” with history and we’ll have the video recorder running to capture it all.

 

From the President: September, 2014

Elaine Henson

Elaine Henson

CB postcard 1938 - A Night On The MidwayNorm Melton is speaking to us this month about growing up on the Carolina Beach boardwalk, so in that vein here’s another postcard showcasing the boardwalk, this one at night.

This postcard is postmarked from Carolina Beach on July 3, 1938 and is from a lady named Janie who mailed it to Axton, Virginia and who also had a very trying vacation.

 

 

At Night on the Midway - 1938 - cardback

Click

On the back of the card, she writes:
“Well we are here. I am not enjoying it so well though. I have had a sick headache all day. Ferrell and Ruby had to cook today, I am better now. We have a nice little new five room house. We liked to have not found a place to stay at all. Seems like everyone is here for the 4th. Rent and all much higher than any other time. We are going to Raleigh Fri. Sure do miss Melvin and Callie. Man was drowned here yesterday, glad I didn’t see him. Hope all of You are well. Love Janie”

 

 

 

Chicken Hicks was One of a Kind

Malcolm Ray “Chicken” Hicks was an early pioneer of “shagging” or the “Carolina Shag.” Coastal historians credit him, along with Billy Jeffers, with its evolution and popularity throughout the 1940s–’50s. Chicken’s love of the R&B sound, then called “race music,” helped introduce this new genre to white audiences throughout Eastern beach communities.

Birth of Shag - MallardsDuring their teens and twenties, Chicken and younger brother Bobby Hicks would visit the “colored” areas around Carolina Beach, NC to check out the “jump joints.” Picking up moves from black dancers, they would electrify audiences with their flashy style.

Chicken was tall and lean with bleach-blond locks. His rebel attitude and unique dance ability quickly gained him popularity among women, as some are rumored to have waited hours for Chicken to sweep them off of their feet.
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From the President – August, 2014

Elaine Henson

Elaine Henson

I am delighted to begin my tenure as president of FPHPS and welcome your ideas and suggestions.

CB Boardwalk

Click for larger image

Many of you may know that post cards are my passion and I hope to share one from my collection each month.

This one of two lucky soldiers and a bevy of bathing beauties is one of my favorites. You can see many of the boardwalk businesses along each side including Benway’s, Wave Theater, Frank’s, Shooting Gallery, Henderson’s and the irrepressible Britt’s DoNuts.

An August 9, 1941 article in the Carolina Beach Sun stated that an average of 25,000 postcards were being mailed from the beach every week, many from soldiers visiting from nearby Fort Bragg, Camp Lejeune and Camp Davis, hard to believe isn’t it? — Elaine Henson


Federal Point Historic Preservation Society

Officers:

President:          Elaine Henson
Vice President:  Tony Phillips
Treasurer:          Demetria Sapienza
Secretary:          Juanita Winner

 Board of Directors:

John Gordon      (2014-2016)
Skippy Winner   (2013-2015)
Jim Dugan         (2013-2015)
Leslie Bright      (2013-2015)
John Moseley    (2013-2015)

Andre Blouin     (2014-2016)
Barry Nelder      (2014-2016)
Jean Stewart     (2014-2016)
Byron Moore     (2014-2016)

 

Society Notes – August, 2014

Cape Fear Camera Club Exhibit Pictures by Keith Kendall
Camera Club - Mt Vernon

Darlene Bright, History Center Director

♦  The History Center recorded 58 visitors in July. We had 35 at the July meeting. The gift shop took in a healthy $303.70; NOT counting all the cookbooks sold. The History Center was also used by Got-‘em-on Live Bait Fishing Club.

♦  PLEASE NOTE: We have a couple of long sleeve T-shirts and some FPHPS sweatshirts on sale. T-Shirts – $5.00. Sweatshirts – $12.00. Great for yard work or other grungy projects.

Camera Club - Coles Motel♦  Please welcome new members Mary Lackey of Wilmington, Sandi Hinton and Jan Dunlap of Greensboro and Ethan Crouch of Carolina Beach. Several people have found us through our Facebook presence.

♦  Thanks to Demetria Sapienza, and Lois Taylor for helping get the Newsletter in the mail this month.

♦  Thanks AGAIN to Andre’ Blouin for all the time he’s put into the new website. The website is up and it’s chock full of all kinds of great information.  Tony Phillips is keeping things growing on our Facebook page. If you are on Facebook please take time to “like” us and share our posts.

Camera Club - Pink House♦  And don’t forget! If you take a trip with Wilmington Water Tours please tell them you are a member of FPHPS! If you do we get a portion of your ticket price. Call us 458-0502, or them 338-3134. www.wilmingtonwatertours.net

 

 

 


Please Support Our Business Members (w/ web links)

Atlantic Towers
Ned Barnes, Attorney
Britt’s Donut Shop
Carolina Marine Terminal Charles Henson Painting
Coastal K-9 Bakery, Inc.
First Bank
Frank’s Pizza
Got-Em-On-Live Bait Club
Hanover Iron Works
Historical Society of Topsail Island
Island Gazette

Kure Beach Fishing Pier
Bob McKoy- Network Real Estate
Olde Salty’s
Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce
Pleasure Island Foundation for a Sustainable Community
Primrose Cottage
SlapDash Publishing
Tom Sayre Construction
Tucker Bros. Realty Company
Wilmington Water Tours
Winner Marine Construction
Winner RV Park

Century Plants

by Janet Hoffer (Island Gazette 6-29-05)

History Center - Agave

Click for more detail

The Century Plant beside the History Center is blooming and lots of people are asking about it. I found this article by Janet Hoffer, for those who don’t know about these unique plants.

 

You may have seen them around town. The prehistoric looking plant with the rosettes of thick, hard, rigid leaves. These plants, called Century Plants, are unique in their life cycle. They only bloom once, generally with a flowering stalk that can reach up to 40 feet and then often die.

Many people think that because of the name, these plants only bloom once every one hundred years, but what the name actually refers to is the fact that the odds of one blooming in any given year are one in one hundred.

The stalk which grows straight up from the middle of the plant produces yellow flowers composed of six petals, and blooms June through August. Flowers grow in clusters and face upward at the end of horizontal branches, appearing only near the top of the stalk. The flowers are ‘perfect’ with both male and female parts.

Members of the Amaryllis Family, the Century Plant provided Native Americans with a source of soap, food, fiber, medicine and weapons.

The Century Plant is sometimes grown in southern California as an ornamental. It is used commercially in Mexico as a source to produce the liquors tequila, pulque and mescal. It is the juice from the interior of the plant that is used to make tequila not the stalk and that is only from specific species. The stalk doesn’t have any juice in it because all the plant’s resources are used in growing the stalk.

Century Plants are native to only the southern most states in the USA with the greatest number in south Texas.

 

Oral History – Joseph Ryder Lewis Jr. – Part 3

Interviewed by Ann Hertzler and Jeannie Gordon

School Years: 1930s – June, 1944

When I first started to school, we were living over here on the highway; and there was no school down here.

Joseph Ryder Lewis, Jr.

Joseph Ryder Lewis, Jr.

There had previously been one down there somewhere, close to where Dow Plant used to be. That was before my time.

But it was gone when I came along.  Mrs. Hines, I think, she was a teacher over there. That’s the Mrs. Hines of the Senior Center.

My first five years of school I had to ride a school bus to Myrtle Grove. That’s up on the Sound about 5 or 6 miles. When I was getting ready for 6th grade, Carolina Beach was supposed to have a new school built, completed and ready to occupy when I started my 6th grade. But they hadn’t completed it, so we had to go on the Boardwalk to the Old City Hall, with a two-room operation. That was 1937-38, I think. It was a one through six. Two rooms, so in one room was 4, 5 and 6; the other room was 1, 2 and 3. The 7th grade, I was bused to Winter Park Grade School. The 8th grade, I was bused to Tileston in Wilmington.

Carolina Beach School 1937-38 year

Carolina Beach School – Class of 1937-1938
Grades 4, 5, 6.
[Click for larger image – and student names]

I’ll tell you what, if you got in trouble at school, you could get a ruler on  your hand and slap it. The teacher would do that …that was about the easiest thing they punished you with. Back in those days, too, if they found out at home, instead of them getting after the teacher or the school department, you got another one.

One interesting thing was when we were in the 6th grade at that school on the Boardwalk. The boardwalk right in front of that building was wood, wasn’t concrete like it is now, with cracks in it. Well, at break time we would go look down through these cracks and you’d see money down there, quite often. We would get a piece of bubble gum and stick it on a long handle stick and stick it down there to get that money. And then we would go to Mr. Cliff Smith’s store down on the corner and get us an extra snack.

And at that point in time, you could get under the boardwalk on the front. It was hunting money by just walking along the edge of the shore, on the beach. You can’t find coins today, I don’t know why it’s gone, I don’t think there’s much of it there today, but you could go along there and there were coins laying there and you’d just pick ‘em up.

School Bus 1930's

School Bus 1930’s

I wasn’t in basketball or baseball or football. I wasn’t in any of it. And one reason was that you had to ride the school bus to school and up in Wilmington, if you didn’t ride that school bus back home in the afternoon, how would you get home? See, New Hanover High School is in the 14 or 1500 block and we could walk down to 3rd street and it wasn’t too bad to get a ride with some men who lived down here but worked in Wilmington. And they would be coming home and pick you up.

I got along very well in high school. But I graduated in June of ’44, had gone through 12 grades, and I was 17 years old. My birthday is the latter part of October, so see I wouldn’t be 18 until the latter part of October. You had to register for the draft when you turned 18 and you could join the Marine Corp or the Army, but you couldn’t join the Navy after you turned 18. You could up until you turned 18, so I was going to join the Navy just before I turned 18, as a volunteer.

 

Olde Salty’s on the Boardwalk

Featured Business Member June, 2014

  – by Tony Phillips

Olde Saltys Exterior

Olde Salty’s on the Boardwalk – (click)

Olde Salty’s is located at 3 Boardwalk Ocean Front, Carolina Beach, NC. It’s a restaurant and bar owned by Brenda Armes. Brenda has owned Olde Salty’s since April 15th, 1994.

She also owned The Landmark restaurant at one time, but says she closed it “because she was competing with herself.”

Brenda and Olde Salty’s has survived over 5 hurricanes including Fran in 1996 which took off the front of her restaurant. That’s when Brenda opened the rear of her restaurant up as a smaller place named ‘A Little On the Side’. She did this so that her employees would still have jobs while the 2 months of construction restored the front.

Tony Phillips

Brenda Armes

Olde Salty’s is open year round and has much to offer visitors and locals. Regardless of the season, fresh food is served every day. Team Trivia is played each Wednesday night during the off season. Bowling competition is held in the back on Tuesdays and Shag dancing on Sundays. Brenda celebrates all festive holidays especially St. Patrick’s Day when she famously leads her own parade with shillelagh in hand around the boardwalk.

Old Salty's Interior

Old Salty’s

When asked how she came up with the name for Olde Salty’s,  Brenda smiled and winked telling us that it was pulled from a hat in 1992 by then town Councilman Rick Burrows. I would love to have that slip of paper today.

Bring the family and friends to Olde Salty’s any day of the week for great food and fun but remember, unattended children will be fed to the sharks and no screamin’ kids are tolerated.

Olde Salty's Shuffleboard

Olde Salty’s Shuffleboard

As Brenda says, “The Boardwalk is the best place in the world!”

Olde Salty’s on Facebook