From the President – March, 2017

Carolina Beach Hotel Part III

By Elaine Henson

The trial for hotel owners H.T. Ireland and J.L. Byrd was slated to begin on Wednesday, January 18, 1928, but was continued to Thursday, January 19th, by Judge N.A. Sinclair because a witness subpoenaed by the state was a no-show on January 18th.  Mrs. S.R. Petty of Greensboro was believed to have important information regarding the whereabouts of a certain unnamed party on the night of the fire. It was also believed that Mrs. Petty was in Ohio and had been there for a while having left unanswered another subpoena from January 3rd. The state contended her testimony would have important bearing in the case. But Judge Sinclair decided the trial would proceed on Thursday without her.

The state began with testimony from the treasurer of the Carolina Beach Corporation, W.W. Walsh of Winston- Salem, who stated that the sale of the hotel was, in reality, a trade for a business property in Winston-Salem.  The CB Corporation got the Winston property with a mortgage of $50,000 and John R. Baker got the hotel with 75 lots and a mortgage of $85,000.  Mr. Baker was supposedly purchasing the hotel for a Mr. R.L. Nisson who planned to move his family to Carolina Beach to live and implement plans of vast improvements for the hotel and lots.  As it turned out Mr. Baker bought it for himself and immediately sold it to Sam Jackson of Mecklenburg County who sold it to Highway Park West, Inc. Ireland and Byrd were two of the owners of that company.

Mr. Walsh also testified that the hotel had to turn away guests “by the hundreds” for July 4, 1917, but by August, business had dropped off considerably owing to the beach season coming to an end.

[I have an idea that being a summer season hotel may have influenced their decision to sell it coupled with the location. It was eight blocks southwest of the boardwalk, the pavilion and all the many activities there. This may have created a problem for hotel guests as it was a long walk back and forth to the boardwalk and they would have to drive.

Guests at the Bame and Greystone Hotels could walk out the front door to the boardwalk and ocean. Also, the fresh water lake may have turned out not to be as much of a draw as anticipated and the guests would have to walk or drive four blocks for ocean bathing. 

Indeed, in the trial’s second day the Wilmington Morning Star reported that the “Defense Counsel poked fun at the advertised slogan that the hotel was located in front of the only freshwater lake located within a few hundred feet of ocean along the Atlantic coast.” 

CB Corporation Treasurer W.W. Walsh also touched on the location by testifying that the hotel was 3,000 feet from the ocean to be closer to the fresh water lake and the lots owned by the corporation.  I can’t quite see the advantage of the hotel being close to potential neighborhoods full of homes. But, of course, the corporation didn’t own any lots on the ocean.]

Further testimony by Marsden de Rosset of the firm de Rosset and Hazlehurst, fire insurance agents, revealed that Mr. Ireland purchased $28,500 additional insurance on the hotel on September 6, 1927.  That was seven days before the fire on September 13th.  Oddly, the premium was paid on September 16th, three days after the fire. The additional insurance meant the hotel was insured for over $100,000.

The State called W. W. Lewis, who lived about a block north of the hotel, who testified about hearing shouts and gun shots about 2:30 in the morning of September 13th.  He ran to the hotel where he helped rescue Byrd and Ireland from the porch roof of the burning building and described the scene there.  Also testifying at the end of day one was Captain W. A. Scott of the North Carolina Fire Commission. He explained the details of the department’s investigation against the pair leading to their indictment, but the newspaper account of his testimony was almost nonexistent.

The second day began with defenses’ unsuccessful motion of a direct verdict of not guilty as to end the trial.

The defense then proceeded with a lengthy list of character witnesses. The witnesses included J. Elmer Long, Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina; B.T. Baynes, president of the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce; C.L. Story, Sheriff of Alamance County; Dr. W. W. Harvey, coroner of Guildford County; bank presidents, real estate developers, builders, insurance executives and attorneys, among the many prominent citizens who testified to the defendants’ character.

The three defense attorneys, led by Wilmington attorney John Bright Hill, then gave ending arguments without calling a single material witness.  The judge spent 20 minutes instructing the jury who returned in 50 minutes with the verdict. This is the headline in the Morning Star’s Saturday, January 27, 1927’s, edition:

 

One can only wonder why the State’s failed witness, being from Greensboro, was in Ohio at the time of the trial ignoring two subpoenas.   And, one can further wonder if that witness’ testimony could have had a different bearing on the case. That, we will never know.

Next month: Part IV: Carolina Beach School on the site.

 

We need your help!

We need your Help!

— What is the oldest building still standing “on the Island” today?

Who/what was Spencer-Farlow and why is a street named for him/it.

 If you have any information on either of these questions please call the History Center (910-458-0502) and let us know.

 

From the President – February, 2017

Carolina Beach Hotel, Part II

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By Elaine Henson

On May 26, 1927, just before opening for the summer season, the Carolina Beach Hotel with all its furnishings plus the adjacent 755 lots were sold to John R. Baker of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.  The sale represented most of the holdings of the Carolina Beach Corporation who had built the hotel and owned the lots.  The sale resulted in a change of management and may have been the reason the formal opening was delayed until June 18th.

Surprisingly, on July 25, 1927, John R. Baker sold the hotel and lots to Sam Jackson of Mecklenburg County who sold it again to Highway Park West, Inc. of Greensboro, North Carolina.

Three sales in two months may have been an indication that the “Roaring Twenties” economy was riding high in a bubble that was to break with the October, 1929 stock market crash resulting in the Great Depression.  Economics aside, the new owners from Greensboro announced on July 28th that they planned to operate the hotel year round and were making plans to do so.

Less than 6 weeks later, on September 13, 1927, the Carolina Beach Hotel lay in smoldering ruins, the result of a fire that burned it to the ground.  Miraculously rescued from the burning hotel were two of the owners, H.T. Ireland and J.L. Byrd, both of Greensboro.

The rescue was assisted by a nearby resident, W.W. Lewis, who was awakened about 2:30 in the morning by gun shots and cries for help. Mr. Lewis said Ireland and Byrd were in their night clothes, had on no shoes and jumped from the 14 foot high porch roof.  The pair were the only ones in the hotel.

Earlier they had been taking inventory of the property with plans of reopening the hotel for the first winter season.  The next day attorneys for Ireland began an investigation of possible arson.  Also on the scene investigating were Stacy W. Wade, North Carolina Fire Insurance Commissioner, and his deputy Captain W.A. Scott.

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On November 18, 1927, H.T. Ireland and J.L. Byrd were arrested in Greensboro after a New Hanover County Grand Jury returned true bills of indictments against them for house burning in connection with the fire at the Carolina Beach Hotel.  They each posted a bond of $5,000 and were to appear in Superior Court, New Hanover County in January, 1928.

Captain W.A. Scott of the NC Fire Insurance Commission and an inspector from the National Board of Fire Underwriters had conducted a thorough investigation of the fire resulting in the grand jury’s action and the men’s subsequent arrests.

Carolina Beach Hotel, Part I

Coming next month, Part III

 

 

Primrose Marketplace – March 11, 2017

Featured Business Member
February, 2017

By Tony (Lem) Phillips

Primrose Cottage has announced that they will have the first Primrose Cottage Market Place of 2017 on March 11th in the store next to them, in the Maxway shopping center behind the ABC store.

We always have a great time at those one day sales. The Federal Point History Center booth will be at the door once again. Lots of exciting things to see.

If you want to set up a table, contact Jill Walker Lyons at 458-0144. Booth is $55.

 

From the President – January, 2017

By Elaine Henson

The grand, new, three story Carolina Beach Hotel opened for the 1926 beach season near the Carolina Beach Lake where Carolina Beach School is today.  But by September of 1927 it was gone. It had lasted for only two summer seasons.

It all began when the Carolina Beach Corporation announced plans for a hotel in mid-1925, you can see the planned site in this April, 1925 map of the beach.

The CB Corporation’s president was S.C. Ogbourne of Winston Salem, NC.  He and Mrs. Ogbourne purchased the Loughlin home on the corner of Lake Park Blvd. and Cape Fear Blvd. as their summer residence.  The house later became The Cottage Restaurant and is presently Havana’s.

Mr. Ogbourne awarded a contract to W.A. Simon on October 27, 1925 to build the hotel which was designed by Wilmington architect Leslie Boney.  By December 7th the hotel’s foundation was laid making it certain to be open by beach season 1926. Also planned was a golf course and a pier for mooring yachts on the Cape Fear River.

The hotel’s location was a big draw as it overlooked a fresh water lake a stone’s throw from the Atlantic Ocean thus affording guests “still water” bathing in the lake as well as the ocean bathing.

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Ogbourne are seen here enjoying the gardenias at their home on the corner of Lake Park and Cape Fear Boulevard

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Ogbourne are seen here enjoying the gardenias at their home on the corner of Lake Park and Cape Fear Boulevard.

The hotel’s formal opening was held on June 4, 1926. Its manager was J.L. Fagan formerly of the Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida and the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia.

There were 75 rooms with adjoining baths, a 150 capacity formal dining room overlooking the verandas, a smaller private dining room and a room for children’s dining. The lobby and mezzanine were furnished with cream colored wicker with print upholstery.  Enclosed porches had orange hued wicker.

Guests could dance the night away to the Meyers Davis Orchestra. The rates were $6 per day or $36 for a week, both rates included meals.

Carolina Beach had its formal opening on June 12 with many Wilmington, New Hanover County and beach dignitaries.

Carolina Beach Hotel from the May 30, 1926 edition of the Wilmington Morning Star

Carolina Beach Hotel from the May 30, 1926 edition of the Wilmington Morning Star

Among the guests at the Carolina Beach Hotel that weekend was the Honorable J.F.A. Cecil and Mrs. Cecil, the former Cornelia Vanderbilt of Biltmore.  The Cecils were married in April of 1924 with a lavish reception at the mansion.  Nearly a hundred years later their grandson, William Amherst Vanderbilt Cecil, continues to oversee the day to day operations of the largest private residence in the United States.

Coming next month, Part II

 

Island Athletic Club

Featured Business Member
January, 2017

By Tony (Lem) Phillips

Our Featured Business Member this month is Island Athletic Club located at 105 Winner Avenue right behind Hop Lite Pub.

We thought that after the wonderful holidays, you might be interested in getting back in shape or just working out a little in a close, clean, quiet environment made just for you.

Go by and take a look. If you are interested in joining, here is what you can expect; a great membership price to begin with which varies because of the great deals offered each month depending on your needs.

Included in this membership is one FREE Training Session which includes easy steps on how to clean the equipment after it has been used. Clean after yourself is a rule posted everywhere in the gym. I like the fact that even families work out there along with Policemen, Firemen, and EMT’s. The gym even has a basketball goal on the patio.

They clean the bathrooms three times daily. There are lockers available in the bathrooms as well. Along every wall are personal items trays for your use. You will also find clean wash cloths to keep the sweat out of your eyes!

They supply a large bottle water cooler, a fridge, and several televisions if you like to watch while you exercise. There is music piped out speakers which is great to keep you going. Open 24/7/365, there is every machine you can imagine and two of some like treadmills and elliptical. Barbells, dumbbells, and free weights abound.

The Island Athletic Club really is a gym where anyone can come and workout anytime.  Their facility is open 24/7 and offers a wide variety of equipment to accommodate the diverse needs in our community.

You can come in and train on your own or be assisted by certified trainers.  Outside of general gym etiquette, there are only a couple of ‘rules’.  The culture is easy-going, clean, and functional.  Additional information can be found on their Facebook page.  Of course, we suggest you stop in and check them out!” Also, watch their Facebook and web page for specials each month!

Drive, walk, or bike over to the gym and look around. The door is always open. Tell them that you saw our article in the Federal Point History Center newsletter and thank them for their support of the Federal Point History Center. We are extremely proud to have Island Athletic Club on our banner of Business Members.

105 Winner Ave.
Carolina Beach, NC 28428
910-707-1616

IACFITNESS.COM
facebook.com/islandathleticclub1/

 

From the President – December, 2016

By Elaine Henson

Many of you may not know that the Hanover Seaside Club at Wrightsville Beach actually had its beginnings here at Carolina Beach.

Captain John W. Harper and other investors formed the New Hanover Transit Company in 1886. They planned to ferry passengers from downtown Wilmington to Carolina Beach by steamer to a dock on the Cape Fear River.  From the dock, passengers could board the Shoo Fly train for the trip from the river to the sea beach.

The first excursions began in the summer of 1887 with guests staying over at Bryan’s Oceanic Hotel and dining at the Railroad Station Restaurant both barely completed.  The resort grew over the next few years to include bath houses, cottages and amusements.

In January of 1898, Captain Harper met with leaders of Wilmington’s sizeable German community who were interested in building a club house at Carolina Beach.  They elected officers, appointed a committee to draw up a constitution and by-laws and to choose a site.  Since most of them came from Hanover, Germany they decided to name it ‘The Hanover Seaside Club’.

The group of over a hundred subscribers pledged an initial fee of $10 each to construct the club.  Later they set up a membership fee of $20 with annual dues of $3. By March, 1898 they approved plans for the clubhouse by architect Henry northend-mapBonitz.  He had designed the 1887 pavilion at Carolina Beach and later designed Lumina Pavilion at Wrightsville Beach built in 1905.

Construction on the clubhouse began in early May of 1898.  It was located ocean front in the block between cross streets Fourth and Fifth which ran from the ocean to Myrtle Grove Sound as seen in the early plot map.

Over a hundred years later, in 1988, the Town of Carolina Beach changed the name of Fourth to Seagull Lane and Fifth to Sailfish Lane.

Also note that the map is before Myrtle Grove Sound was dredged and widened in 1939 becoming the yacht basin with the dredge spoil creating additional land and Canal Drive.

The Club’s first floor had a 30’ by 40’ auditorium in the center with a ladies’ parlor and toilet room, kitchen, dining room and lunch alcove.  The upper story was for the gentlemen and was accessible only by an outdoor stair.  It contained a 25’ by 30’ billiard salon, a café, smoking room, two card rooms, a plain chamber and custodian’s room.  The building was encircled downstairs with a 20’ wide porch or piazza as it was called.  The upper floor had a porch in the front and back together containing 1,000 feet.

The Club was completed by July 3, 1898 and had safety lines with floaters, also called life lines, in the ocean for the safety of the bathers.  It also had a 120’ long railroad platform so members could get off and on the Shoo Fly train right at the club house.

hanover-seaside-clubThe members enjoyed nine seasons at Carolina Beach before deciding to build a second club house at Wrightsville Beach which opened September 3, 1906.

The plan was to have two locations but by1909 they sold the Carolina Beach building to T. A. Boyd of Hamlet who operated it as a boarding house.

Anyone interested in reading more about the Seaside Club can get a copy of Ann Hutteman’s One Hundred Golden Summers: A History of the Hanover Seaside Club 1898-1998 at the library.  Ann is my good friend and a longtime member of FPHPS.  Most of my research for this letter came from the first chapter of her book.


 

Seabreeze Part 6 – The 50s

by Rebecca Taylor

The 1950’s

After World War II Carolina Beach business owners worked hard to present the beach as a “family friendly” resort. The resort continued to attract large crowds, and on holidays cars might line the road as hundreds of black patrons walked along the main highway to Carolina Beach. Sometimes on weekend nights in the summer, Seabreeze music was audible for miles, and sometimes Carolina Beach officials and residents pressured Seabreeze business owners to lower the volume.

In 1951, Frank and Lulu (Freeman) Hill sold their New York residence and returned to Seabreeze to invest their life savings, building a restaurant, beach pavilion, bathhouse, and a paved parking lot on Lulu’s inherited land – now part of Freeman Park. monte-carloThey called it the Monte Carlo by the Sea.

They came by bus, by cars, and whole churches. The Monte Carlo drew groups from  all over North and South Carolina. “We had a lot of groups who came up even as far as South Carolina…We had them come up in busses,” said Frank Hill who was proud of the Monte Carlo and believed it was the best beach facility available in North and South Carolina.

“The black people didn’t have any other place to go…there was that place down in Atlantic Beach, down in South Carolina, but I think they only had about half a block space that they could be on.”

The Wilmington City Directory of 1955 listed the following businesses at Seabreeze Beach: The Hotel Faison, the Daley Hotel, owned and operated by Richard Daley who also owned the Breeze Point Pavilion; the Edgewater Cafeteria, The Breeze Inn, and the Tavern, owned by Bruce and Bill Freeman. The Tavern was a lunch room but also had dining, dancing and facilities for private parties.

Juke Joints

The heartbeat of Seabreeze was its many juke joints.  At one point there were as many as 31 juke joints where jukeboxes (known as piccolos locally) supplied the “race music” that spawned not only rock-and-roll, but also the Shag, and Beach Music.

Those who vacationed there remember it well. Booker T. Wilson, who lives in Bolton, visited Seabreeze regularly as a young man. When asked what he remembered most about the place, Wilson promptly replied, “The dancing!” His favorite style of dance? “Swing. All of it,” he said.

juke-jointsThe music of Seabreeze drew people from miles around as live bands and jukeboxes exploded with the sounds of swing, soul and rhythm and blues brought to life by the voices of Little Richard, James Brown, the Platters and others. The area became known as a music mecca. Seabreeze’s music was so distinctive that many locals called the beach strand “Bop City.”

Clam Fritters

Recipes for clam fritters were closely guarded family secrets, and fritters varied from one eatery to the next. It would be safe to say that the basic recipe included eggs, milk, flour, and clams. Every restaurant specialized in seafood, fried fish, oysters, and soft shell crabs all gathered from the crystal clear sound shallows. Among the most famous was Sadie Wade’s place where hundreds of diners enjoyed the nickel apiece clam fritters; the recipe is still a guarded secret of those with Seabreeze in their heritage.

Arthur Ross once put together the batter for the cakes. He estimated they sold 3,000 of the 6-inch- wide cakes made up of clams, green peppers, onions, flour and other secret ingredients before being deep-fried.  The ocean breezes that blew through Seabreeze were no doubt infused with the smell of palate-pleasing dishes. Restaurants in Seabreeze served a diverse selection of food, but were renowned for their fresh and local seafood.

Hurricane Hazel

On October 15, 1954, Hurricane Hazel came ashore west of Seabreeze, along the Brunswick County Coast. The Category 4 storm, with 140 mile-per-hour winds and an 18 foot storm surge wreaked havoc all along the North Carolina coast, but hit Seabreeze with a blow that it would never recover from.hurricane-damage

Because Freeman Beach was not listed as a Wilmington-area beach, it did not receive aid to rebuild.

When the storm departed, residents and property owners were tasked with cleaning, clearing and rebuilding. People who held land in common with other relatives found the job particularly daunting, as they were deemed ineligible for disaster relief loans.

Without financial assistance, many could not afford to rebuild. Those who were able, however, worked hard to bring Seabreeze back to life. Music, food and laughter did return; but the Seabreeze that once was, would be no more.

Frank Hill remembers, “It had taken away everything.” The severe erosion caused by Carolina Beach Inlet and Hurricane Hazel destroyed the majority of the sound side and ocean side businesses and homes. Few people at Seabreeze had insurance and though many salvaged what building materials they could and tried to rebuild, Hazel was followed by two category storms the next year; Hurricane Connie and Hurricane Ione.

Frank Hill continues, “We survived until that last one [Hurricane Alma] came through in ’62, and by them opening the Carolina Beach inlet it made it impossible because the beach was eroding so bad and it just put us out of business for good.” This damage was exacerbated by the Carolina Beach Inlet Development Corporation’s establishment of an inlet from the Atlantic Ocean to the Intracoastal Waterway claiming it would make access to the Atlantic Ocean easier.

Beach Music/Birth of the Shag

The R&B, soul, and beach music that played was notorious for drifting down streets and into other neighborhoods. Prominent musicians such as the Bobby Blue Band and Bo Diddley performed at Seabreeze.  Accommodations were also plentiful for overnight visitors, who by law, weren’t allowed to stay at hotels reserved for whites. Famous entertainers like Fats Domino, James Brown, and Ike and Tina Turner played for white audiences in Wilmington, but slept at the 25 room Loftin Hotel.

By the 40’s you had whites in their teens and 20s coming to Seabreeze to listen to the music. Then they’d go back to Carolina Beach and tell the club owners what was hot. Music at Seabreeze was a bit different from Wrightsville and Carolina Beach because it was black swing, rhythm and blues—in short, everything the white race rioters had so greatly feared a couple decades earlier. The dance moves seemed suggestive and the volume was cranked up to a level that could be heard for miles around.

The legend of Malcolm Ray “Chicken” Hicks is a local favorite. Hicks was a teenager in 1941 when he visited Seabreeze and picked up on the R&B music and dance, which he already knew from his upbringing in Durham. Jukeboxes, which were called piccolos, were in every jump joint, and Hicks had an appreciation for what was then called race music.

Hicks also had a connection with a fellow named Parker who loaded up the jukeboxes at both Seabreeze and Carolina Beach, and was able to persuade Parker to put some of the same records he would have heard in Seabreeze into the jukeboxes in Carolina Beach.

 

Hurricane Hazel – A Special but Evil Storm

By Nancy Gadzuk

hurricane-hazel-1954Steve Pfaff of the National Weather Service spoke at the History Center’s October 17, 2016 meeting. Originally Steve was scheduled to make a presentation on Hurricane Hazel. And then Hurricane Matthew happened on October 9th.

steve-pfaffDespite working long hours dealing with the aftermath of Matthew, Steve found the time to weave his original presentation on Hazel into a fascinating presentation that combined information on both Hurricanes Hazel (1954) and Matthew (2016).

paths-of-hurricanes-hazel-mathewHe began by sharing some information about Hurricane Hazel, a “special but evil storm.” Hazel became a Category 3 hurricane very quickly and killed over 1,000 people as it tore through Haiti, a pathway that Matthew would unfortunately follow as well.

He cautioned that we should not let radar fool us when determining how big a threat a hurricane may pose. Over-reliance on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale to determine hurricane strength and possible destructive effects has been problematic, especially with storms such as Hazel and Matthew, where storm surge and high water levels have been so destructive.

hurricane-hazel-impactsHe cited meteorologist Ryan Knapp’s apt example to show relative destructive impacts: I can breathe in 100 mile per hour winds, but I can’t breathe under 10 feet of water.

Hazel had what Steve called “good air”: high barometric pressure that allowed for a very large storm surge. High temperatures preceding the hurricane and a high lunar tide, along with unusually warm water temperature, all contributed to a powerful 18 foot storm surge that wiped out most of the oceanfront dwellings in Brunswick County.

byron-mooreByron Moore, long-time History Center member who lived in Carolina Beach during Hazel, shared some of his recollections of the storm and its aftermath. His family lived on Canal Drive and water went up to the speedometer of the car sitting in the driveway. He remembered seeing propane tanks floating down Canal Drive and 6 to 8 feet of sand on Carolina Beach Avenue North. Other audience members contributed their own memories of the devastation Hazel caused.

return-period-for-hurricanesSteve warned us that the return period for hurricanes along the North Carolina coast was 5 to 7 years. Also, since 1999 there have been five 500 to 1000 year flood events in the Southeast in case anyone has a notion to become complacent and let their insurance lapse.

From the President – November, 2016

By Elaine Henson

Most residents on our island consider 1954’s Hurricane Hazel as the worst hurricane ever to hit our area.  It was the only Category Four hurricane in southeastern North Carolina in all of the 20th Century or since. And, it came in on a lunar high tide. It is often the benchmark to which all other hurricanes are compared. 

Hazel’s reputation often overshadows the 1955 hurricane season which had three hurricanes impacting coastal North Carolina with two of the hurricanes hitting within 5 days of each other.

Hurricane Connie hit on August 12, 1955 as a Category Two with typical strong winds, high tides and heavy rainfall.  It caused heavy crop damage and 27 deaths in North Carolina.

Five days later, on August 17, Hurricane Diane made landfall in North Carolina as a Tropical storm with winds of 50 mph and gusts of 74 mph in Wilmington.  The waves were 12 feet, tides were 6-8 feet above normal and the storm surge caused damage to homes along the beach and coastal flooding on top of the rain-soaked area from Connie. hazel-cb This August 17, 1955 press photo of Hurricane Diane shows the 1600 block of Carolina Beach Avenue North featuring two flat top houses on the ocean front. Their porches are gone and waves are splashing at the front door. 

Lane Holt, whose parents Dan and Margaret Holt operated the Carolina Beach Pier on the north end, confirmed that these two houses were just a few yards south of the pier.

He remembers Connie and Diane well and reports that the post Hazel rebuilt pier held up through the two storms, but the tackle shop was destroyed again. Then on September 19, 1955 Hurricane Ione made landfall near Wilmington as a Category Two storm leaving more flooding, strong winds, storm surge, more crop damage and 7 dead in North Carolina.

Not only did Pleasure Island have to rebuild after Hazel in 1954, a year later it suffered three hurricanes in just 37 days and faced more rebuilding and repairs.  It makes one understand just how strong and resilient our residents are.