News Articles – 1873

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

June – July 1873
The breakwater closing New Inlet between Zeke‘s Island and Smith‘s Island was practically completed, the distance being 4,400 feet. A Major Griswold was the officer in charge of the work. Completed in July . VOL.1

In July, the 1873, the Federal Point jetty was begun, and by winter it was extended to 500 feet in length. The object of the works was primarily to serve as a deflector to the New Inlet currents. VOL.1

 

July 4, 1873
The 4th of July holiday was celebrated by a group of 15 gentlemen who went down the river on the steam tugboat JAMES T. EASTON to Federal Point. They celebrated the 4th by raising a large flag and listening to an oration by A. T. London, Esq. Some of the officers and soldiers from the garrison at Smithville were present and the occasion was hugely enjoyed. While there, the group visited the New Inlet Dam or as we call the Rocks, and inspected them with Henry Nutt, who was chairman in charge of the work. (Star, 7-11-1873)

 

July 8, 1873
The first crib of the new breakwater at Federal Point was placed in position near the old fish house wharf. The second crib was placed in position of July 10th.

 

September 1873
Mr. J. R. Sneeden, a resident near Wilmington had a valuable mule stolen from him at Picket‘s Point, in Federal Point Township. The thief was Augustus G. Reaves and he was caught at a place called Jumping Run, on the outskirts of Wilmington, where he was floundering in the mud and mire. Reaves was tried before a magistrate and committed to jail. (Star, 9-12-1873)

 

October 23, 1873
Mr. Nicholas Carr was appointed Constable for Federal Point Township by the Board of County Commissioners. (Star, 10-24-1873)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1874

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

January 10, 1874
Since November 7th, 1873 four additional foundation cribs had been placed in position and filled with stone, extending the line of breakwater about 100 feet from the starting point. As fast as the work is leveled up to the line of high water, the beach makes up and now follows the breakwater about 100 feet from the starting point, and the whole of Federal Point is widening and elevating itself. It is generally concede that the breakwater should be extended 1,500 feet before stopping it. (Star, 1-14-1874)

 

May 29, 1874
H. L. Horn was appointed to the Central Executive Committee for the Conservative Party of New Hanover County to represent Federal Point Township. (Star, 5-29-1874)

 

August 6, 1874
Stephen Keyes served as Register and Sol Reaves, H. L. Horn, Jos. Burris, Joseph Davis as Poll holders at Little‘s Store, the polling place for Federal Point Township in the county election.  (Star, 7-10-1874)

 

August 11, 1874
Capt. Simon S. Grissom, aged 62 years, 7 month and 17 days, died from heart disease in Smithville, NC. He was born at Federal Point, near where the waves he  braved abound;

“But lighter as life‘s burden rest upon
Thee, the soil of Carolina, good man.” (Star, 8-15-1874)

 

August 11, 1874
Capt. Simon S. Grissom, 62 died of heart disease. He was born on Federal Point on December 25, 1811. He as a popular and efficient pilot on the Cape Fear River. Interment was in the Smithville Cemetery. VOL.I

 

October 7, 1874
Henry Koch, the young watchman at the government works on Zeke‘s Island about 26 years of age was accidentally drowned when he fell from a boat. His funeral was held in Wilmington from a house at the corner of 4th and Church Streets. Interment was in Oakdale Cemetery. (Star, 10-10-1874)

 

December 18, 1874
A bill was introduced in the State House at Raleigh to incorporate the Wilmington and Federal Point Plank Road. (Star 10-20-1874)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1875

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

1875 …. Federal Point Township
We learn that Balaam Wade, colored Constable for Federal Point Township, gave bond and qualified on Saturday last. (Star, 8-19-1875)

 

January 8, 1875
Ann M Craig, wife of Joseph Craig, died. Born June 16, 1807. Interment on Federal Point. Vol I

 

June 23, 1875 …. Federal Point
Colonel Craighill, U.S. Army Engineers, opened proposals for the extension of the Federal Point jetty at the New Inlet. This is an important work, being to close New Inlet by artificial means, and thus increase the depth of the river to the harbor of Wilmington, so as to admit the passage of large vessels. New Inlet was defended by the Confederate Fort Fisher during the late war.

Old records show that this inlet has been in existence for somewhat over a century, and that its origin was due as much (if not more) to the action of the wind upon the dry sand of the beach as to the tendency of the river currents to seek that outlet to the sea. Up to the summer of 1873 no steeps were ever taken to contract the area of outflow at New Inlet, although several breaks which had from time to time occurred below New Inlet had been successfully closed.

On July 1, 1873, the work for closing the space between Smith‘s Island and Zeke‘s Island had just been completed, and New Inlet remained the only passage to the sea except the mouth of the river. In July, 1873, the present Federal Point jetty was extended to 500 feet in length. The object of this work was primarily to serve as a deflector to the inlet currents, and not necessarily to form an integral part of any closing work which might afterwards be undertaken, the direction given it served to diminish the distance across the Inlet by only about 400 feet—thus leaving the distance across, from end of jetty to Zeke‘s Island , about 3,800 Feet. One of the results of this work has been the growth of Federal Point. (Star, 6-24-1875)

 

August 6, 1875
Col. Craighill, of the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, in his Baltimore office, opened the proposals for certain work at New Inlet, the ultimate purpose was the entire closing of the same. (Star, 8-10-1875)

 

August 14, 1875
Anthony Hawes, colored, resigned his newly acquired position of Magistrate in Federal Point Township. Thomas M Gardner, of Wilmington, was appointed to act in his stead. (Star, 8-14-1875)

 

August 15, 1875
Jacob Horne, the Magistrate in Federal Point Township, was planning to remove his office to Wilmington at an early date. (Star, 8-15-1875)

 

August 24, 1875
It was reported that the contract for closing New Inlet Bar, below Wilmington, had been awarded by the government to Messrs. Bangs & Dolby, of Manlius, N.Y. at the following figures: For an apron, $20,00; for closing New Inlet to the low water mark, $188,000. The object was that of stopping the outflow to the ocean at New Inlet of the water of the Cape Fear River, and thus turn the entire volume out of the main bar or original mouth of the river, thus assisting in deepening it. (Star, 8-24-1875)

 

September 4, 1875
The Board of Trustees of Federal Point Township met and organized by electing T.M. Gardner, Esq., as chairman. The school committee for the township were(sic) duly qualified as was also the Constable, Balaam Wade, who gave a bond of $500 as a renewal of his former bond, he having been re-elected. The Clerk was granted further time in which to prepare his bond. (Star, 9-10-1875)

 

September 4, 1875
Balaam Wade, colored, Constable for Federal Point Township. Gave bond and qualified. (Star, 8-19-1875)

 

September 24, 1875 …. Federal Point
It was learned that Messrs. Bangs & Dolby were not going to close New Inlet but were to form the base for the accomplishment of that undertaking. Their contract was for the construction of a carpet or apron, which was to be built to stone four feet deep and from forty to seventy feet wide in the center of the current. The final closing of the inlet will require a further appropriation by the government. (Star, 9-24-1875)

 

September 25, 1875 …. Federal Point
Several large government flatboats were being constructed in Wilmington for use at the bar and river works at New Inlet in conveying stone to the scene of operations. (Star, 9-25-1875

 

October 3, 1875 …. Federal Point
A large lighter or scow was being built at Messrs. Cassidey & Ross‘ shipyard for Messrs. Bangs & Dolby, who had the contract for constructing the stone “carpet” or “apron” at New Inlet. It was to be 100 feet long, 6 feet deep and 20 feet width of beam. (Star, 10-3-1875)

 

December 26, 1875
William Grissom died. Born March 9, 1807. Internment on Federal Point. VOL.I

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1876

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

1876
The land now Carolina Beach came into the hands of Bruce Freeman and remained in his family for many years. His family still owns land on Federal Point. (Star, 6-15-1941)

 

January 3-4, 1876
Justice Cassidey spent two days in Federal Point Township, where he went in the capacity of Special Commissioner of the Court of Claims, for the purpose of taking depositions in the cases of parties whose property was destroyed by the Federal troops during the military operations in that section towards the close of the late war. This testimony was to be forwarded to Washington, D.C. to be used by the Court of Claims in connection with the cases alluded to. (Star, 1-6-1876)

 

January 12, 1876
The steam-tug ROYAL ARCH, Capt. Davis, arrived from Georgetown, S.C., and was designed to be employed at the government works (Rocks) now in progress at New Inlet. (Star, 1-13-1876.)

 

January, 1876
Capt. Charles B. Phillips, engineer in charge of the work on the New Inlet Dam (Rocks) was succeeded by Capt. Henry Bacon, of the U.S. Engineer Corps. Capt. Phillips died in Norfolk, VA, about five years later, in June, 1881. VOL.I.

 

January 12, 1876
A man landed at Zeke‘s Island, near the government works (Rocks) in a boat in which he had come all the way from Buffalo, New York. The boat was about 18 feet in length. (Star 1-18-1876)

 

January 30, 1876
A corn vessel went ashore on the beach between Zeke‘s Island and Bay Beach, near the government works (Rocks). She was full of water and the surf was breaking over her. It was thought that she was the schooner SNOW STORM, Capt. Rhodes, of Elizabeth City, N.C. (Star, 2-1-1876)

 

January 31, 1876
The tugboat J.MURRAY, of the fleet employed by the contractors on the government works at New Inlet, ran on a log and carried away her stern-post and rudder, and was then towed up to Wilmington for repairs. (Star, 2-1-1876)

 

January 23, 1876 …. Federal Point
Capt. C.B. Phillips, who recently resigned the position of engineer of the government works, (The Rocks), as succeeded by Capt. Henry Bacon, of the U.S. Engineer Corps. (Star, 1-23-1876.

 

November 17, 1876 …. Federal Point
Messrs. Bangs & Dolby were awarded the contract by the government for supplying 45,000 cubic yards of stone necessary to the further prosecution of the work for the contraction of New Inlet. It was their plan to quarry the rock from the quarry near the river. (Star, 11-17-1876)

 

December 27, 1876
(Advertisement) – LABORERS WANTED. 300 laborers wanted at the U.S. government works, Magnolia Tree Quarry, Cape Fear River. The laborers must provide themselves with blankets; cooking utensils and good quarters will be furnished. BANGS & DOLBY, Contractors. (Star, 12-27-1876)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1877

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

March 9, 1877 …. Federal Point
The school house for white pupils was destroyed during a terrible storm. An application made by Stephen Keyes of Federal Point Township for $50 from the general school fund to rebuild the schoolhouse in Federal Point Township was granted by the County Commissioners. (Star, 6-6-1877)

April, 1877 …. Federal Point
A terrible gale broke over and washed the beach between New Inlet and Bald Head Island for a distance of 3,000 feet, leaving the entire area covered with water about one foot below ebb tide, and there was made a narrow passage of greater depth, which became known ‘Philips‘s Inlet,” through which at high tide some very light draft vessels could pass. By November, 1879, the passage was closed at low tide. (Star, 7-11-1879)

April 4, 1877. …. Federal Point
Mr. Armstrong Hall, engineer of the steam tug ROYAL ARCH, presented a petrified lobster and a petrified oyster for inspection by the MORNING STAR newspaper. They were unearthed recently on the Cape Fear River at the “Magnolia Tree”  quarry, where rock was being quarried for the government works at New Inlet. The lobster and oyster were found at a depth of 18 feel below the surface of the earth, and they were almost perfect in shape. (Star, 4-4-1877)

April 21, 1877
Chares M. Epps was the teacher in the public school for colored children in Federal Point Township. His records showed that he had 34 “scholars of African race,” 24 boys and 10 girls. The average attendance was 24. There was only one teacher.

July 19, 1877 …. Federal Point
The newly appointed Justices of the Peace, or Magistrates, representing Federal Point township, included: Hosea L. Horne, for six years; John H. Savage, for four years; Stephen D. Keyes, for two years. (Star, 7-19-1877)

August 18, 1877 …. Federal Point
FOR SALE – 360 acres of land with four dwelling houses, kitchens, and all necessary out-houses, situated at the head of Myrtle Grove Sound, convenient to the river end of the beach. Persons wishing to purchase will apply to James T. Burriss, on premises. (Star, 8-18-1877)

September 17, 1877
The Board of County Commissioners elected C.W. Oldham as Constable for Federal Point Township. His bond was fixed at $1,000. (Star, 9-18-1877)

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1878

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

January, 1878
The Board of Education of New Hanover County ordered that an apportionment of two dollars be made from the school fund per capita to the public schools of the various districts. The apportionment for Federal Point District No. 3 – 82 white children; amount $164; 84 colored children; amount, $168. (Star, 1-16-1878)

 

January 2, 1878
Mr. Taylor, the keeper of the Federal Point Lighthouse, dined on a fine, fat duck for his dinner on last Saturday, although it was a rather costly duck to the government. On Friday about midnight, Mr. Taylor was attending to his light, when a duck came crashing through one of the large glasses, falling at his feet dead. The duck had
been blinded and lured to its death by the light. The valuable glass was shattered beyond repair. This was the second time that a bird had crashed into the Lighthouse. (Star, 1-3-1878)

 

January 7, 1878
The steam-tug ORLANDO arrived from Baltimore, which had been purchased by George Z. French, Esq., who had the contract for the present year for closing up New Inlet, and it was designed to take the place of the tug ROYAL ARCH in towing flats to and from the government works at New Inlet and the rock quarry near Rocky Point. Mr. French had four or five new flats constructed for this purpose. Capt. James Williams of Wilmington was in command of the ORLANDO. (Star, 1-8-1878)

 

January 7, 1878
Henry G. Davis resigned as overseer of the Federal Point Road, and W.H. Williams was appointed to the position at a meeting of the New Hanover County Commissioners. (Star, 1-8-1878)

 

January 12, 1878
The steam tugboat ROYAL ARCH, formerly employed in towing flats to and from the government works (Rocks), started for Baltimore, but in attempting to go out through New Inlet, which had been partially closed, she grounded on the Rocks, or “apron” comprising a part of the dam, and she remained there for about 9 hours until the flood tide came in and she floated off. The accident resulted in damage to her propeller and some other slight damage, and she was put on the marine railway for repairs. (Star, 1-16-1878)

 

February, 1878
It was reported that from October 20, 1877, 11,129 cubic yards of stone had been placed in position at New Inlet by the contractors, Bangs & Dolby. The stone was purchased at Rocky Point, N.E. Cape Fear River. VOL.I.

 

April, 1878
Col. Craighill suspended work on the closing of New Inlet due to the need of funds from Washington, D.C. VOL.I

 

June, 1878
An appropriation of $160,000 was made by Congress for the government work at New Inlet.

 

August, 1878
Three hundred men were wanted for work at the Excelsior Quarries near Rocky Point to work quarrying stone for the New Inlet work. Steady work for a year was promised. VOL.I

 

November, 1878
The New Inlet work continued. The old breakwater of 1873 was repaired. A. Mr. Cunningham, resident superintendent of the works for the past 8 years, was transferred to Charleston harbor. VOL.I

 

December, 1878
A storm carried away about 50 feet of the breakwater at New Inlet on the Zeke‘s Island side. VOL.I.

 

August 5, 1878
Messrs. French & Dolby of Wilmington were awarded the contract for supplying about 50,000 cubic yards of stone for continuing the work for the closure of the New Inlet, on the eastern side of the river below Wilmington. Their bid was $1.75 per cubic yard. (Star, 8-8-1878; 8-13-1878)

 

August 11, 1878
(advertisement) – 300 Men Wanted at Excelsior Quarries at Rocky Point to work quarrying stone for the U.S. Government Works (New Inlet). Steady work for a year. Thomas Williams was the superintendent. (Star, 8-11-1878)

 

September 10, l878
A large number of blacks left New Bern, N.C. for Rocky Point, N.C. where they were to be employed by the U.S. government in getting out stone from the quarries to be put in New Inlet. John C. Thomas of Wilmington was to be one of the overseers. (Star, 9-10-1878)

 

September 10, 1878
A group of 24 men from Beaufort, N.C. under a Capt. Hamilton, with a small vessel and a fine, large seine, had established a mullet fishery on the beach near the Federal Point Lighthouse, where they expected to remain during the fall months. A couple of days ago that caught 300 barrels of mullets in two hauls, 100 by the first and 200 by the second. Owing to the hot weather, they only succeeded in saving one-half of them. (Star, 9-10-1878)

 

November 1, 1878
A grand Democratic rally was held at Biddle‘s Store in Federal Point Township. Messrs. B.R Moore, J.D. Bellamy, Jr., F.H. Danby and J.I. Macks were expected to address the people on the occasion. (Star, 10-30-1878)

 

December 11, 1878
The recent storm carried away about 50 feet of the breakwater at New Inlet on the Zeke‘s Island side. (Star, 12-11-1878)
Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1879

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

March 21, 1879
Mr. Thomas Williams of Pender County was the sub-contractor for supplying the stone for the use of the government in filling up New Inlet. The rock was shipped from Rocky Point quarry, where 400 men were employed removing the rocks. (Star, 3-21-1879)

 

June 14, 1879
Mr. Henry Nutt, chairman of the Committee on River and Bar Improvement, informed the Wilmington Newspaper, THE MORNING STAR, that New Inlet was closed. It was his honor to be the first to walk across this day, at 12 noon, dry-footed, from Federal Point to Zeke‘s Island, a distance of nearly a mile, in the company of his grandson, Wm., M. Parsley. When he was about half way across, he was saluted with three cheers from about 60 laborers engaged in throwing in stone. (Star 6-20-1879)

 

June 26, 1879
Notice was given to all mariners that the gap in the dam at New Inlet, mouth of Cape Fear River, North Carolina, had been filled, thus closing the whole distance between Zeke‘s Island and Federal Point. The buoys marking the channel of New Inlet were to be removed. (Star, 7-11-1879)

 

June 26, 1879
The Office of the Lighthouse Board, Washington, D.C., announced that the buoys marking the channel of New Inlet would be removed, now that the gap in the dam at New Inlet had been filled, this closing the whole distance from Zeke‘s Island and Federal Point. (Star, 7-11-1879)

 

September, 1879
A shark was caught off Federal Point a few weeks ago that measured about 14 feet in length. In the contents of his large stomach was a tin bucket, a glass bottle and a number of other articles of a totally indigestible nature. At the same time that he was captured, the fins of a large number of others could be seen in the vicinity. The bait used for catching the shark was a chunk taken from a large sturgeon that had drifted ashore in a rotting condition. (Star, 9-26-1879)

 

September 6, 1979 …. Federal Point
Proposals for continuing operations on the work for closure of New Inlet were received and opened by Col. Craighill, Engineer, U.S. Army, Baltimore, MD. The contract was awarded to Messrs. Ross & Pennypacker, of Wilmington, at $2.24 per ton.

In order to finish the dam at New Inlet to high water mark and protect it against the force of the waves, it was proposed to cover the top and the sea slope to low water mark with heavy flat stones, so as to make the top surface and slopes smooth and even. The covering needed will be about 3,500 feet in length, and the average thickness of the stone will be about 18 inches. It is estimated that about 10,000 tons of granite will be required. (Star, 9-19-1879)

 

September 15, 1879
The Light House Board gave notice that in consequence of the closing of the New Inlet, at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, North Carolina, the light on Federal Point would be discontinued on and after January 1st, 1880. (Star, 9-23-1879)

 

October 11, 1879
J.L. Winner opened a jewelry store at No 8 South Front Street, where he offered to repair watches, clocks and chronometers. He had been in the business for 20 years. (Star, 10-11-1879)

 

November 11, 1879
George Z. French, Esq., completed his contract with the U.S. Engineer Department in furnishing stone for the closing of New Inlet. He furnished 20,000 tons in three months. (Star, 11-11-1879)

 

November 24, 1879
The first loads of heavy granite rock for the sea-face and capping of the dam (Rocks) at New Inlet reached Wilmington on the Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta Railroad. A derrick-scow is being repaired for the placing of the granite in position.

The granite was from the old Granby quarries, in the vicinity of Columbia, S.C. (Star, 11-28-1879, 10-3-1879)

 

November 27, 1879
Mr. Henry Bacon, Assistant Engineer in charge, reported that the dam at New Inlet was in good condition. The base was everywhere wide, and at low water mark it was generally more than 30 feet in width,, with very wide slopes, especially on the sea side. (Star, 11-26-1879)

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1880 – 1882

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

January 1880
The tax books of 1879 showed that 28 colored people owned 4,338 acres of land valued at $6,125. in Federal Point Township. (Star, 1-25-1880)

 

January 5, 1880
Sundry citizens of Federal Point Township sent a petition to the Board of County Commissioners asking for a discontinuance of Section No.1 of a public road, extending from the 15 mile post on the Federal Point Road to the Poor House. The petition was granted and the road was discontinued. (Star, 1-8-1880)

 

April, 1880
The pilot Boat ROSA SCARBOROUGH, belonging to the Messre. Craig, of Federal Point, when off Little Island in the Cape Fear River, about 10 miles below Wilmington, was struck by a hurricane and capsized and sunk in about 10 or 11 feet of water. The men were saved by taking to a boat which happened to be in tow at the stern. (Star, 4-16-1880)

 

1880
The Bald Head Lighthouse was re-lighted, because the New Inlet was now closed. The Federal Point Lighthouse was found to be useless. VOL.I

 

August, 1880
Capt. John W. Harper, master of the river steamer PASSPORT was the first to refer to the New Inlet Dam as the “Rocks.” He was also the first to take excursion passengers to the point of interest.

 

July 1, 1880
A large water spout was witnessed between Fort Fisher and Sow‘s Marsh, near the mouth of the river. The wind at the time was blowing nearly a hurricane. The water spout covered a space of about 50 yards in circumference, and moved a distance of about 1 1/4 miles. The water from the spout ascended to an altitude of about 100 to 150 feet, and looked like a white funnel-shaped cloud. The phenomenon was witnessed by about 75 persons, including the employees at the government works and a large number of fishermen. (Star, 7-4-1880)

 

August 17, 1880
The steamer PASSPORT was to make her last trip of the season to the “Rocks” at New Inlet. Capt. John W. Harper, master of the steamer, stated that “the tide will exactly suit for a good day‘s fishing at this point, being low water about 12 noon”. (Star, 8-13-1880)

 

September 28, 1880
W.E. Davis, of Wilmington, who had a fishery at Federal Point, caught at one haul, about 16,000 mullets, which, when salted down, would make about 80 barrels. His seine was so loaded down with the mullets that it burst, and he lost many of them. He utilized every barrel that could be found in which to salt his fish down, then filled a good-sized skiff with them, and finally had to bury some for the lack of containers in which to corn them properly to keep them from spoiling. (Star, 9-30-1880)

 

January 18, 1882 …. Federal Point
The headquarters of Mr. Henry Bacon, Assistant Engineer in charge of the government works, was changed from Smithville to Wilmington. (Star, 1-18-1882)

 

May 18, 1882 …. Federal Point
(advertisement) – TO EXCHANGE FOR CITY PROPERTY, or will sell on desirable terms. A Farm on the eastern bank of Cape Fear River, 30 miles from Wilmington; 365 acres; 160 under cultivation, balance good pasture, well timbered. Suitable for truck farming and stock raising. A two-story dwelling house, kitchen, barns, and all necessary outhouses. Address inquiries to A.C. care of  Star Newspaper. (Star, 5-18-1882)

 

August 29, 1882
The Federal Point Fishing Club was organized recently and a piece of property picked out for their club building. They enjoyed fish and soft crab suppers and enjoyed the delightful breezes and had a splendid time. The site was wonderful reaching from the river to the ocean.

The building for the accommodation of the club was 40 by 15 feet in dimensions and had a double piazza facing on the north and south. The house had been nicely furnished and supplied with crockery, Mr. Henry Bishop having charge of the culinary department. (Star, 8-29-1882)
Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1883

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

May 10, 1883
A party of gentlemen visited the large fishery of Messrs. W.E. Davis and Sons, on Zeke‘s Island. There were four or five families residing on the island, and there were six houses.

A pen was visited in which 600 terrapins of all sorts and sizes were confined. There was also a fine stock of poultry, including some 150 chickens, to say nothing of ducks, geese, etc. The fish traps were visited, and the Messrs. Davis explained their workings. They were fished at 5 a.m. and again at 5 p.m. Next the fertilizer establishment was inspected. Here all the refuse fish, such as cannot be sold, are cut up into fragments, put in a sort of press constructed for the purpose and all the oil extracted , after which the fragments were gathered up, spread out on a large platform to dry and are then bagged and sold for fertilizing purposes.

A railroad had been constructed from the ocean on one side of the island to the river on the other, and on and on his fish, after being taken from the traps, are hoisted from the sharpies by a derrick and placed in a car, are transported to the other side of the island and dumped into boats in the river. (Star, 5-12-1883)

 

May 13, 1883
The steamboat MINEHAHA was to make a trip to Federal Point on Sunday morning and would leave the Wilmington Wharf at 9 a.m. sharp The master of the vessel was Joseph Bisbee. (Star, 5-12-1883)

 

August 15, 1883
The steamer MINNEHAHA offered a moonlight excursion to Federal Point on Wednesday night, August 15th. There was to be a sheepshead supper at Mayo‘s Place, also music and dancing. The round trip fare was 50 cents. She would leave the Wilmington wharf at the 8 o‘clock sharp. (Star, 8-14-1883)

 

May 17, 1883
Two members of the Federal Point Fishing Club, organized last season, went down the “The Rocks” at New Inlet and succeeded in landing 84 sheepshead. This was considered a fine day‘s sport. (Star, 5-19-1883)

 

July 21, 1883
The storehouse of Messrs. W.E. Davis & Son, who had extensive fisheries in the vicinity, was burned to the ground. The fire destroyed all their nets, seines and other material. The building adjoining the storehouse was pulled down to save it. The fire created a big excitement among the fishermen and others on the Point, who with a whole ocean of water before them, could not stop the devouring element in its course. (Star, 7-24-1883)

 

July 21, 1883
The storehouse of Messrs. W.E. David & Son was destroyed by fire at Federal Point. The Davis Company owned large fisheries in the vicinity. Destroyed in the fire were all their nets, seines and other materials, which was to prove detrimental during the upcoming fish season. The fire could be seen from Smithville across the river. Another building adjacent to the storehouse had to be pulled down. An employee, Mr. Williamson, asleep in a room, escaped unhurt. The fire created a big excitement among the local fishermen and others on the Point. The Davis family estimated their losses at about $4,500 with about half covered by insurance. (Star, 7-27-1883)

 

August 9. 1883
The contracts for furnishing the necessary material on the improvements to the Cape Fear River were opened. The following were the lowest bidders: for rattling and spun yarn, John C. Springer and N. Jacobi; for brush and cane, Ross & Lara; for stone, G.Z. French; for the building of five scows, Geo. R. Sumerell. (Star, 8-10-1883)

 

August, 1883
Proposals for furnishing the necessary material for carrying on the improvements to the Cape Fear River, especially New Inlet Dam, were opened at the office of Major Henry Bacon, engineer in charge. The lowers bidders were: for brush and cane and stone – Messrs. Ross & Lara; for the building of five scows, George R. Sumerell. VOL.I.

 

August 14, 1883
A moonlight excursion was offered on the steamboat PASSPORT to Federal Point. Music and dancing, Sheepshead Supper at Mayo‘s Place. Fare for round trip 50 cents. One hour at Federal Point. John W. Harper and George N. Harriss, Managers. (Star, 8-14-1883)

 

September, 1883
A terrible hurricane struck the lower Cape Fear area. The destruction of Messrs. W.E. Davis & Sons fishery on Zeke‘s Island was fearful. Their loss was heavy, among which were 2200 terrapins waiting for shipment to the North, 13 gillnets, 3 fish sheds, 25 barrels of salt mullets, 30 sacks of salt, one new boat, a lot of fish stands. etc. VOL.I.

 

September 21, 1883
Chesley A, Craig, aged 25 years and 10 months, died on Federal Point. Funeral held from the residence of his father. (Star, 9-22-1883)

 

September 27, 1883
Messrs. W.E. Davis & Son, at their Federal Point fishery, caught over 400 large drum at one haul, averaging 40 pounds each; being pronounced the largest haul of drum on record. (Star, 9-28-1883)

 

October 4, 1883
Messrs. Ross & Lara, to whom the contract was awarded for supplying stone, brush and other necessary material for filling up or closing what is known as “Corncake Inlet,” near what was formerly New Inlet, were busy making preparation to begin the work.

Their base of operation was at the Keystone Quarry, at Gander Hall, opposite Orton. A short railroad track was under construction from the quarry to the river, about 1 1⁄2 miles long. A steamer named HAROLD was due soon to do the towing of the rock to the work site. Mr. Henry Bacon, Sr., a civilian employee of the U.S. Engineers, was building a large wharf at Gander Hall to facilitate the work. (Star, 10-4-1883)

 

October 15, 1883
The steam tug, HAROLD, Capt. Crawford, from Jacksonville, FL, arrived in the Cape Fear River. She was to be used by Messrs. Ross & Lara, the contactors at work at filling up “Corncake Inlet” with stone and brush. (Star, 10-16-1883)

 

October 21, 1883 …. Federal Point
Messrs. Ross & Lara, contractors, were receiving shipments of lumber at Gander Hall for the erection of “shanties” for the men working in the Keystone quarry at that place. Work on the short line of railroad was also underway. (Star, 10-21-1883; 11-15-1883. 10-9-1882)

The Federal Point Club prospected on Zeke‘s Island, examining the dam, fish weir, etc., and they traveled down as far as Corn-Cake Inlet. (Star, 10-12-1882)
Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1884

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

1884 …. Federal Point
(advertisement) 100 Good Quarry Hands for Government Work at Keystone Quarries on Cape Fear River, 14 miles below Wilmington. Ross & Lara, Contractors (Star, 2-3-1884)

 

May 14, 1884  
(advertisement) – FOR RENT – Until November 1, 1884, or longer, two very nice Cottages, at the Rocks, (Federal Point), Kitchen, Water, etc. to each. All in No. 1 order and ready for immediate use. (Star, 5-14-1884)

 

May 28, 1884 …. Federal Point
Mr. A.S. Lara, of the firm of Ross & Lara, contractors for the work of closing Corncake Inlet, at the mouth of the river, who had been visiting at his home in Stuanton, VA.for about two months had returned. (Star, 5-30-1884)

 

June 21, 1884
The locomotive used by Messrs. Ross & Lara on their railroad from the rock quarry to the river, in supplying rock to close up Corncake Inlet, was returned to the quarry after it was enlarged to suit the work by Messrs. Hart, Bailey & Co.’s foundry in Wilmington. (Star, 6-24-1884)

 

July 27, 1884
The “Rocks,” at what was formerly known as New Inlet, was now a favorite resort for fishermen. (Star, 7-27-1884)

 

July, 1884
It was reported that the “rocks” was a favorite resort for fishermen. VOL. I

 

August, 1884
A little girl from Wilmington was hurt at the “Rocks” when she jumped into some broken glass with her bare feet. She was given first aid by some nearby fishermen and then carried to the Mayo House, a resort hotel operated at the “Rocks.” During the same month two young ladies from Wilmington were rescued from drowning while swimming at the “Rocks.”  VOL. I

 

August, 1884
During a severe storm at the “Rocks,” lightning struck the flag pole at the government wharf at Corncake Inlet. A fisherman nearby was severely shocked and one of his hands badly bruised when he fell down. He was holding a metal-ribbed umbrella at the time which acted as a conductor.  VOL. I

 

July 11, 1884
R.G. Ross, contractor, killed a rattlesnake at the rock quarry near Gander Hall, below Wilmington, which is said to have had 16 rattles. It is described as being as large as a large man‘s leg. (Star, 7-11-1884)

September, 1884
Two new contracts were awarded for supplying stone for the further closing of what was known as Corncake Inlet. A total of 30,000 tons of stone was still required. VOL. I

 

October, 1884
A correspondent in Washington, D.C. wrote: “The new work is progressing rapidly. The dam is two miles long, reaching from Zeke‘s Island to the Big Marsh, 25,000 tons of stone had already been used, and the dam, on the average, is about one foot above low water. The appropriations made by the last Congress will not quite complete the work.” VOL. I

 

September 26, 1884
The new work at Federal Point was progressing rapidly. The dam was now two miles long, reaching from Zeke‘s Island to the Big Marsh, 25,000 tons of stone had already been used, and the dam, on an average, was about one foot above low water. The appropriation made by the last Congress would not quite complete the work. Mr. Henry Bacon believed that when the present dam was completed, a sandbar would form between it and the ocean, the same as at New Inlet, and the result would be the washing out of the bar at the mouth of the river to 18 or 10 feet. (Star, 10-14-1884)

 

October 15, 1884
The New Inlet Dam was in perfect condition. The sand beach which since the completion of the dam had been extending on the site of Carolina Shoals from near Fort Fisher towards the head of Smith‘s Island had widened and it extended nearly to the island, a distance of nearly two miles, leaving a gap of less than half a mile over shoal water between the new bank and Smith‘s Island. (Star, 10-17-1884)
Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994