Federal Point Methodist Church, St. Paul’s Methodist Church and the Federal Point Methodist Cemetery

From the Bill Reaves Files

June 17, 1917: The new Methodist Church at Federal Point, which had just been completed, was dedicated at 3:30 in the afternoon.  Rev. J .H. Shore, presiding elder of the Wilmington District of the N.C. Conference, delivered the sermon. It was said at the time -This church will stand as a fitting tribute to the memory of the handful of loyal Methodists who live in this section of the county.  Although the county in this vicinity is very sparsely settled, the people have erected a church that is a distinct credit to their community. WILM. STAR, 6-19-1917

April 3, 1938:  The family of A. W. Hewett gave the Federal Point Methodist Church a silver communion service in his memory. WILM. STAR, 4-7-1938

February 12, 1945: Construction of a new Presbyterian church in the downtown area of Carolina Beach was begun.  The building materials had been ordered and work was to begin as soon as they arrived. John McLeod, student at the Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., preached for the Carolina Beach congregation in the Methodist Church building.  WILM. STAR,  2-9-1945.

April 21, 1946: The 4th annual Easter Sunrise Service was held at Carolina Beach.  The service began at sunrise, 5:30 A.M.  The sponsoring churches were Carolina Beach Baptist Church, St. Paul’s Methodist Church, Carolina Beach Presbyterian Church, Federal Point Methodist Church, All-Saints-By-The-Sea (Episcopal), Church of the Immaculate Conception (Catholic), and the Community Church.  WILM. EVENING POST, 4-20-1946

February 8, 1947: The pastors of Carolina Beach’s Protestant churches today were members of a new Carolina Beach Ministerial Association organized last night.  The Rev. Ben B. Ussery, pastor of the town’s Baptist church, was elected president, and the Rev. John D. McLeod, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, was named corresponding and recording secretary.  The other constitutions belonging to the association were the beach’s Methodist and Community Churches.  The Episcopal Church is expected to join also. At the organizational meeting, preliminary plans were laid for the resort’s fifth annual Easter Sunrise service.  WILM. POST, 2-8-1947

April 4, 1947: A three-act dramatization of THE FIRST EASTER MORNING was presented by the Young Adult Class of St. Paul’s Methodist Church.  The public was invited to this part of Carolina Beach’s pre-Easter observance program.  Included in the cast were: O’Neill Johnson, Homer Craver, Mike Bame, Jack White, Ryder Lewis, Chevis Faircloth, Jimmy Busch, Ernest Bame, Bunny Hines, Glenn Eaker, Rachel Bame, Ellen White, William McDougald, Edwin Carter, Sallie Faircloth and Ruby Knox.

Serving on the committees for the presentation were: Virginia Beach, Mrs. Odell Oldham, Mrs. Woodrow Hewett, A.L. Mansfield, Mrs. George Russ, Francis Ludwig and sons, Mrs. Edwin Carter, Mrs. Bunny Hines and Mrs. Sam Frisbee. WILM. NEWS, 4-2-1947

April 25, 1947: Plans were underway for the construction of an educational and recreational building for the young people of Carolina Beach.  The program was being handled by the Methodist Youth Fellowship committee, and all members were joining the campaign to raise funds.  A seafood supper on April 26th was the initial step in the fund raising.  The supper was to be held at Mrs. Reynolds Boarding House, operated by Mrs. R.W. Reynolds.  The building and facilities on the playground were to be located on the property of the Methodist Church. WILM.NEWS, 4-25-1947

November 12, 1947: Members of the Federal Point Methodist Church, Carolina Beach, elected their officers for the new year. The officers of the church were J. Otis Davis, Charge Lay Leader; the board of trustees included Dave Lewis, O.W. Davis and Mrs. J. N. Todd.  The communion steward was Mrs. J. N. Todd; membership committee, Mrs. Dave Lewis; pastoral relations committee, Mrs. G. C. Henniker; nominations committee, W. T. Lewis and Miss Beatrice Davis. Audit Committee, J. Otis Davis; golden cross, Mrs. O. W. Davis, board of missions and church extension, Mrs. J.O. Davis; committee  on evangelism, Mrs. W. T. Lewis; parsonage committee, Miss Beatrice Davis.  Stewards included J .O. Davis, W. T. Lewis, George H. Henniker, and Dave Lewis; parsonage trustees, Lee O. Davis. Officers of the Sunday School included Mrs. Ray Peterson, Dave Lewis, Mrs. J. O. Davis, Miss Beatrice Davis, W. T. Lewis.  WILM. STAR, 11-16-1947

February 6, 1948: Mayor A. P. Peay, of Carolina Beach, proclaimed today as a “Day of Prayer” at the resort.  This special day corresponded to a worldwide observance of a “world Day of Prayer.”  Special prayer services were conducted at St. Paul’s Methodist Church with a picnic lunch on the church grounds.  WILM. POST, 2-5-1948

October 24, 1965: St. Paul’s Methodist Church held its 22nd Annual Homecoming with a former pastor, the Rev. W. M. Wells, Jr., as guest minister.  During the past seven years, St. Paul’s had carried on an extensive modernization program.  During this period it had erected a new sanctuary, educational building and parsonage.

The church was organized on July 18, 1943, with 33 charter members.  The membership of the old Federal Point Methodist Church was absorbed in the new church.  Today the church membership was 317 and the church school enrollment was 178.  The present pastor was Rev. Thomas C. Fulcher, a native of West Virginia, who arrived in June, 1965 from Goldsboro.  WILM. STAR, 10-24-1965

February 8, 1985: Dow Road on Federal Point, one of New Hanover County’s biggest eyesores, was being cleaned up by many volunteers.  The project was dubbed “Operation Clean Sweep,” and it was organized by the New Hanover Clean Community Commission and a ranger from Carolina Beach State Park.  The two day cleanup started today when heavy equipment from the Sunny Point Military Ocean Terminal and Carolina and Kure Beaches were used to pick up large items dumped in the area.  The area near the Federal Point Cemetery at Dow Road and Ocean Boulevard were policed by Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Brownies and members of the Sand Fiddlers Club.  Other volunteers included firefighters from Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Federal Point and residents of the Fort Fisher Air Station, as well as members of Community Watch and the Carolina Beach Homemakers Club.  Between 300 and 400 refrigerators and stoves as well as construction debris, sofas and mattresses had been dumped in the clean-up area.  St. Paul’s United Methodist Church was planning to fence off the cemetery to keep dumpers out.  WILM. STAR, 2-9-1985

 

‘The Rocks’ 1761 – 1950: from the Bill Reaves Files

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

September 20, 1761
New Inlet was formed by a great storm, which visited the coast and lasted four days. This inlet grew in width and depth until large sailing vessels could pass through, and later steamships. VOL. I.

New Inlet as recorded in Civil War mapping records, 1864 (Cowles, Davis, Perry, & In 1871, Kirkley, 1895)

New Inlet as recorded in Civil War mapping records, 1864 (Cowles, Davis, Perry, & Kirkley)
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April 7, 1817
Charles B. Gause deeded an acre of land on Federal Point to the United State government for the erection of a light house. The deed was recorded in New Hanover County Deed Book P, page 396

1818
Captain Otway Burns brought the first steamboat to ply the Cape Fear River to Wilmington, passing through the New Inlet, coming from Beaufort, N.C.   (The Scene Magazine, Wilmington, N.C.)

1866
Cape Fear (Bald Head) Lighthouse was extinguished because a new lighthouse had been erected on Federal Point.

1869-70
A study was begun to close the “New Inlet.” An open space of two miles between Federal Point and Smith Island beach where the beach was wearing away and where navigation was almost destroyed was given a great deal of attention.   (Star 8-25-1877)

January 20, 1870
A report was made of the soundings on New Inlet Bar:
South slue on Bar – 9 1⁄2 feet.
North slue on Bar – 8 feet
On Rip – 9 1⁄2 feet   (Star, 1-23-1870)

October 3, 1870
The fish oil works began operations at Fort Fisher as a sufficient number of little fatbacks had been obtained. The plant is operated by the Navassa Guano Company. About eighty barrels of the little fish were caught at one haul, and this was enough to yield six barrels of oil.  Another haul was expected soon.   (Star 10-5-1870)

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The Rocks - Battery Buchanan - Zeke's Island - Bald Head Island[click]</i<

The Rocks – Battery Buchanan – Zeke’s Island – Bald Head Island
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June 9, 1871
Henry Nutt reported the completion of the work across Deep Inlet, the northern end of the finished super-structure resting firmly upon the highest part of the old stone work at a point designated upon the plan of the government works, near Zeke‘s Island , as the cross, thus effectually sealing up this inlet in a substantial and permanent manner.

When we take into consideration the formidable character of this work, an opening of about or over 500 feet, requiring a superstructure over 600 feet lineal by 20 feet wide and over 40 feet high, to shut out or stop a current of water passing in and out at a rate of 8 or 10 miles an hour, and all of this to be accomplished within the short space of about 8 months, and at a cost of within the sum of $100,000, the skill and industry of the officers in charge who designed the executed this great work, should receive the high appreciation of all. (Star, 6-11-1871)

June 11, 1871
Henry Nutt reported that the experiments for collecting drift sand and thereby elevating the beach in low parts of it, has not been made in consequence of financial deficiency. The first imperfect experiment has acted well, and accomplished all that was expected of it, elevating the beach above storm tide, thus proving the feasibility of building up the beach to any desired height by judicious treatment at small cost.  (Star, 6-11-1871)

Between August 12th and Sept. 2nd, 1871
A most violent northeast gale visited the coast, producing some apprehension, according to Henry Nutt, for the safety of the government works in progress, and later during the month, much rainy weather prevailed, retarding operations somewhat. From the violence of the storm some of the unfinished cribs and preparatory timber was displaced, which involved some loss of time and labor to replace them in position again. This was successfully and speedily accomplished through the energy and skill of the local superintendent, and all is now going on well again.   (Star, 9-6-1871)

September 2, 1871
A report issued on this date mentioned that the beach south of the government works was growing. The catch-sand fences had proven successful. Not a rail had been removed by the recent storm, and the brush had been completely covered with sand to the top of the fence, presenting an embankment 3 to 5 feet high, and far above the reach of any tide. This, and the weak parts of the beach where the wind had blown out trenches between the hills, was now being strengthened by a system of cultivating the “beach grass.”.

This grass bore transplanting well; none of that which was set out in July and August had died; but all growing and doing well, and it was suggested that transplanting could be done at any season of the year. Where the “beach grass” was planted, it had not only successfully resisted the blowing away of sand, but has already collected, it at many places, a foot or over in height.   (Star, 9-8-1871)

Building 'The Rocks'

Building ‘The Rocks’ – Click for more details

September 6, 1871
A report by Henry Nutt noted that the shoals in the vicinity of the government works had somewhat changed their position. Zeke‘s Island is somewhat changed, indicating an increased low-water area, while its high water area appears diminished. There is some appearance of an increased depth of water in the small inlet south of Zeke‘s Island.   (Star, 9-6-1871)

September 30, 1871
It is perceptible that the water is shoaling in the vicinity of the government works on both sides of it and the outer shoals were evidently moving up in a body. The point of beach is extending northward and in front of the works. The inlet south of Zeke‘s Island seems not to be effected, as its depth of water is still maintained, while Zeke‘s Island itself is gradually wearing away, and is almost covered with high tides.   (Star, 10-3-1871)

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June – July 1873
The breakwater closing New Inlet between Zeke‘s Island and Smith‘s Island was practically completed, the distance being 4,400 feet. A Major Griswold was the officer in charge of the work. Completed in July.  VOL. 1

In July, the 1873, the Federal Point jetty was begun, and by winter it was extended to 500 feet in length. The object of the works was primarily to serve as a deflector to the New Inlet currents.   VOL. 1

July 4, 1873
The 4th of July holiday was celebrated by a group of 15 gentlemen who went down the river on the steam tugboat JAMES T. EASTON to Federal Point. They celebrated the 4th by raising a large flag and listening to an oration by A. T. London, Esq. Some of the officers and soldiers from the garrison at Smithville were present and the occasion was hugely enjoyed. While there, the group visited the New Inlet Dam or as we call the Rocks, and inspected them with Henry Nutt, who was chairman in charge of the work.   (Star, 7-11-1873)

July 8, 1873
The first crib of the new breakwater at Federal Point was placed in position near the old fish house wharf. The second crib was placed in position of July 10th.

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January 10, 1874

Since November 7th, 1873 four additional foundation cribs had been placed in position and filled with stone, extending the line of breakwater about 100 feet from the starting point. As fast as the work is leveled up to the line of high water, the beach makes up and now follows the breakwater about 100 feet from the starting point, and the whole of Federal Point is widening and elevating itself. It is generally concede that the breakwater should be extended 1,500 feet before stopping it.   (Star, 1-14-1874)

October 7, 1874
Henry Koch, the young watchman at the government works on Zeke‘s Island about 26 years of age was accidentally drowned when he fell from a boat. His funeral was held in Wilmington from a house at the corner of 4th and Church Streets. Interment was in Oakdale Cemetery.   (Star, 10-10-1874)

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June 23, 1875
Colonel Craighill, U.S. Army Engineers, opened proposals for the extension of the Federal Point jetty at the New Inlet. This is an important work, being to close New Inlet by artificial means, and thus increase the depth of the river to the harbor of Wilmington, so as to admit the passage of large vessels. New Inlet was defended by the Confederate Fort Fisher during the late war.

Old records show that this inlet has been in existence for somewhat over a century, and that its origin was due as much (if not more) to the action of the wind upon the dry sand of the beach as to the tendency of the river currents to seek that outlet to the sea. Up to the summer of 1873 no steeps were ever taken to contract the area of outflow at New Inlet, although several breaks which had from time to time occurred below New Inlet had been successfully closed.

On July 1, 1873, the work for closing the space between Smith‘s Island and Zeke‘s Island had just been completed, and New Inlet remained the only passage to the sea except the mouth of the river. In July, 1873, the present Federal Point jetty was extended to 500 feet in length. The object of this work was primarily to serve as a deflector to the inlet currents, and not necessarily to form an integral part of any closing work which might afterwards be undertaken, the direction given it served to diminish the distance across the Inlet by only about 400 feet—thus leaving the distance across, from end of jetty to Zeke‘s Island , about 3,800 Feet. One of the results of this work has been the growth of Federal Point.  (Star, 6-24-1875)

August 6, 1875
Col. Craighill, of the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, in his Baltimore office, opened the proposals for certain work at New Inlet, the ultimate purpose was the entire closing of the same.   (Star, 8-10-1875)

August 24, 1875
It was reported that the contract for closing New Inlet Bar, below Wilmington, had been awarded by the government to Messrs. Bangs & Dolby, of Manlius, N.Y. at the following figures: For an apron, $20,00; for closing New Inlet to the low water mark, $188,000. The object was that of stopping the outflow to the ocean at New Inlet of the water of the Cape Fear River, and thus turn the entire volume out of the main bar or original mouth of the river, thus assisting in deepening it.   (Star, 8-24-1875)

September 24, 1875
It was learned that Messrs. Bangs & Dolby were not going to close New Inlet but were to form the base for the accomplishment of that undertaking. Their contract was for the construction of a carpet or apron, which was to be built to stone four feet deep and from forty to seventy feet wide in the center of the current. The final closing of the inlet will require a further appropriation by the government.   (Star, 9-24-1875)

September 25, 1875
Several large government flatboats were being constructed in Wilmington for use at the bar and river works at New Inlet in conveying stone to the scene of operations.   (Star, 9-25-1875)

October 3, 1875
A large lighter or scow was being built at Messrs. Cassidey & Ross‘ shipyard for Messrs. Bangs & Dolby, who had the contract for constructing the stone “carpet” or “apron” at New Inlet. It was to be 100 feet long, 6 feet deep and 20 feet width of beam.   (Star, 10-3-1875)

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1876
The land now Carolina Beach came into the hands of Bruce Freeman and remained in his family for many years. His family still owns land on Federal Point.   (Star, 6-15-1941)

January 3-4, 1876
Justice Cassidey spent two days in Federal Point Township, where he went in the capacity of Special Commissioner of the Court of Claims, for the purpose of taking depositions in the cases of parties whose property was destroyed by the Federal troops during the military operations in that section towards the close of the late war. This testimony was to be forwarded to Washington, D.C. to be used by the Court of Claims in connection with the cases alluded to.   (Star, 1-6-1876)

January 12, 1876
The steam-tug ROYAL ARCH, Capt. Davis, arrived from Georgetown, S.C., and was designed to be employed at the government works now in progress at New Inlet.   (Star, 1-13-1876)

January, 1876
Capt. Charles B. Phillips, engineer in charge of the work on the New Inlet Dam (Rocks) was succeeded by Capt. Henry Bacon, of the U.S. Engineer Corps. Capt. Phillips died in Norfolk, VA, about five years later, in June, 1881. VOL. I.

January 12, 1876
A man landed at Zeke‘s Island, near the government works (Rocks) in a boat in which he had come all the way from Buffalo, New York. The boat was about 18 feet in length.   (Star 1-18-1876)

January 30, 1876
A corn vessel went ashore on the beach between Zeke‘s Island and Bay Beach, near the government works (Rocks). She was full of water and the surf was breaking over her. It was thought that she was the schooner SNOW STORM, Capt. Rhodes, of Elizabeth City, N.C.  (Star, 2-1-1876)

January 31, 1876
The tugboat J.MURRAY, of the fleet employed by the contractors on the government works at New Inlet, ran on a log and carried away her stern-post and rudder, and was then towed up to Wilmington for repairs.  (Star, 2-1-1876)

January 23, 1876
Capt. C.B. Phillips, who recently resigned the position of engineer of the government works (Rocks), as succeeded by Capt. Henry Bacon, of the U.S. Engineer Corps.  (Star, 1-23-1876)

November 17, 1876
Messrs. Bangs & Dolby were awarded the contract by the government for supplying 45,000 cubic yards of stone necessary to the further prosecution of the work for the contraction of New Inlet. It was their plan to quarry the rock from the quarry near the river.  (Star, 11-17-1876)

December 27, 1876
(Advertisement) – LABORERS WANTED. 300 laborers wanted at the U.S. government works, Magnolia Tree Quarry, Cape Fear River. The laborers must provide themselves with blankets; cooking utensils and good quarters will be furnished. BANGS & DOLBY, Contractors.  (Star, 12-27-1876)

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April, 1877
A terrible gale broke over and washed the beach between New Inlet and Bald Head Island for a distance of 3,000 feet, leaving the entire area covered with water about one foot below ebb tide, and there was made a narrow passage of greater depth, which became known ―Philips‘s Inlet,‖ through which at high tide some very light draft vessels could pass. By November, 1879, the passage was closed at low tide.  (Star, 7-11-1879)

April 4, 1877
Mr. Armstrong Hall, engineer of the steam tug ROYAL ARCH, presented a petrified lobster and a petrified oyster for inspection by the MORNING STAR newspaper. They were unearthed recently on the Cape Fear River at the ‘Magnolia Tree’ quarry, where rock was being quarried for the government works at New Inlet. The lobster and oyster were found at a depth of 18 feel below the surface of the earth, and they were almost perfect in shape.  (Star, 4-4-1877)

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January 7, 1878
The steam-tug ORLANDO arrived from Baltimore, which had been purchased by George Z. French, Esq., who had the contract for the present year for closing up New Inlet, and it was designed to take the place of the tug ROYAL ARCH in towing flats to and from the government works at New Inlet and the rock quarry near Rocky Point. Mr. French had four or five new flats constructed for this purpose. Capt. James Williams of Wilmington was in command of the ORLANDO (Star, 1-8-1878)

February, 1878
It was reported that from October 20, 1877, 11,129 cubic yards of stone had been placed in position at New Inlet by the contractors, Bangs & Dolby. The stone was purchased at Rocky Point, N.E. Cape Fear River. VOL. I.

April, 1878
Col. Craighill suspended work on the closing of New Inlet due to the need of funds from Washington, D.C.  VOL. I

June, 1878
An appropriation of $160,000 was made by Congress for the government work at New Inlet.

August, 1878
Three hundred men were wanted for work at the Excelsior Quarries near Rocky Point to work quarrying stone for the New Inlet work. Steady work for a year was promised.  VOL. I

[Editor note 2015:  re: French Brothers, Excelsior Plantation and Quarries, Rocky Point:

“When the channel of the Cape Fear River was deepened, the rock that filled the new inlet below Wilmington came from the Rocky Point section on the North East Cape Fear River. When completed in 1875, it was called “The Rocks.””
http://www.visitpender.com/Communities/RockyPoint.aspx ]

August 5, 1878
Messrs. French & Dolby of Wilmington were awarded the contract for supplying about 50,000 cubic yards of stone for continuing the work for the closure of the New Inlet, on the eastern side of the river below Wilmington. Their bid was $1.75 per cubic yard.  (Star, 8-8-1878; 8-13-1878)

August 11, 1878
(Advertisement) – 300 Men Wanted at Excelsior Quarries at Rocky Point to work quarrying stone for the U.S. Government Works (New Inlet).  Steady work for a year. Thomas Williams was the superintendent.   (Star, 8-11-1878)

September 10, l878
A large number of blacks left New Bern, N.C. for Rocky Point, N.C. where they were to be employed by the U.S. government in getting out stone from the quarries to be put in New Inlet. John C. Thomas of Wilmington was to be one of the overseers.  (Star, 9-10-1878)

December, 1878
The recent storm carried away about 50 feet of the breakwater at New Inlet on the Zeke‘s Island side.  (Star 12-11-1878)

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March 21, 1879
Mr. Thomas Williams of Pender County was the sub-contractor for supplying the stone for the use of the government in filling up New Inlet. The rock was shipped from Rocky Point quarry, where 400 men were employed removing the rocks.  (Star, 3-21-1879)

June 14, 1879
Mr. Henry Nutt, chairman of the Committee on River and Bar Improvement, informed the Wilmington Newspaper, THE MORNING STAR, that New Inlet was closed. It was his honor to be the first to walk across this day, at 12 noon, dry-footed, from Federal Point to Zeke‘s Island, a distance of nearly a mile, in the company of his grandson, Wm., M. Parsley. When he was about half way across, he was saluted with three cheers from about 60 laborers engaged in throwing in stone.  (Star 6-20-1879)

June 26, 1879
Notice was given to all mariners that the gap in the dam at New Inlet, mouth of Cape Fear River, North Carolina, had been filled, thus closing the whole distance between Zeke‘s Island and Federal Point. The buoys marking the channel of New Inlet were to be removed. (Star, 7-11-1879)

June 26, 1879
The Office of the Lighthouse Board, Washington, D.C., announced that the buoys marking the channel of New Inlet would be removed, now that the gap in the dam at New Inlet had been filled, this closing the whole distance from Zeke‘s Island and Federal Point.  (Star, 7-11-1879)

September 6, 1979
Proposals for continuing operations on the work for closure of New Inlet were received and opened by Col. Craighill, Engineer, U.S. Army, Baltimore, MD. The contract was awarded to Messrs. Ross & Pennypacker, of Wilmington, at $2.24 per ton.

In order to finish the dam at New Inlet to high water mark and protect it against the force of the waves, it was proposed to cover the top and the sea slope to low water mark with heavy flat stones, so as to make the top surface and slopes smooth and even. The covering needed will be about 3,500 feet in length, and the average thickness of the stone will be about 18 inches. It is estimated that about 10,000 tons of granite will be required.  (Star, 9-19-1879)

September 15, 1879
The Light House Board gave notice that in consequence of the closing of the New Inlet, at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, North Carolina, the light on Federal Point would be discontinued on and after January 1st, 1880.  (Star, 9-23-1879)

November 11, 1879
George Z. French, Esq., completed his contract with the U.S. Engineer Department in furnishing stone for the closing of New Inlet. He furnished 20,000 tons in three months.  (Star, 11-11-1879)

November 24, 1879
The first loads of heavy granite rock for the sea-face and capping of the dam (Rocks) at New Inlet reached Wilmington on the Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta Railroad. A derrick-scow is being repaired for the placing of the granite in position.

The granite was from the old Grandy quarries, in the vicinity of Columbia, S.C.  (Star, 11-28-1879, 10-3-1879)

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1880
The Bald Head Lighthouse was re-lighted, because the New Inlet was now closed. The Federal Point Lighthouse was found to be useless.  VOL. I

August, 1880
Capt. John W. Harper, master of the river steamer PASSPORT was the first to refer to the New Inlet Dam as the “Rocks.” He was also the first to take excursion passengers to the point of interest.

August 17, 1880
The  steamer  PASSPORT  was  to  make  her  last  trip  of  the  season  to  the  “Rocks”  at  New  Inlet.    Capt.  John  W. Harper,  master  of  the  steamer,  stated  that  “the  tide  will  exactly  suit  for  a  good  day’s  fishing  at  this point, being low  water  about  12  noon”.   (Star, 8-13-1880)
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February 5, 1881
The  government works (The Rocks) at New Inlet  were  reported to be covered with a solid  sheet  of  ice,  from Federal  Point  to  Zeke’s Island.    The jetties were similarly coated.  (Star, 2-5-1881)

May 13, 1881
The  steam-tug  WM.NYCE  is towing the government barges to and from New Inlet while the ORLANDO was being raised and put in order.   (Star, 5-13-1881)

August 23, 1881
The lighthouse at Federal Point was destroyed by fire late this afternoon.  This lighthouse had not been in use since the closing  of  New  Inlet, but it was occupied as a dwelling by  Mr. Taylor, the former  keeper. It was a wooden structure, situated about one mile from the site of Fort Fisher.   (Star, 8-24-1881)

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January 18, 1882
The  headquarters  of  Mr. Henry  Bacon, Assistant  Engineer  in  charge of the government works, was changed from Smithville to Wilmington.   (Star, 1-18-1882)

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May 10, 1883
A party of gentlemen visited the large fishery of Messrs. W.E. Davis and Sons, on Zeke‘s Island. There were four or five families residing on the island, and there were six houses.

A pen was visited in which 600 terrapins of all sorts and sizes were confined. There was also a fine stock of poultry, including some 150 chickens, to say nothing of ducks, geese, etc. The fish traps were visited, and the Messrs. Davis explained their workings. They were fished at 5 a.m. and again at 5 p.m. Next the fertilizer establishment was inspected. Here all the refuse fish, such as cannot be sold, are cut up into fragments, put in a sort of press constructed for the purpose and all the oil extracted , after which the fragments were gathered up, spread out on a large platform to dry and are then bagged and sold for fertilizing purposes.

A railroad had been constructed from the ocean on one side of the island to the river on the other, and on and on his fish, after being taken from the traps, are hoisted from the sharpies by a derrick and placed in a car, are transported to the other side of the island and dumped into boats in the river.   (Star, 5-12-1883)

May 13, 1883
The steamboat MINEHAHA was to make a trip to Federal Point on Sunday morning and would leave the Wilmington Wharf at 9 a.m. sharp The master of the vessel was Joseph Bisbee.  (Star, 5-12-1883)

May 17, 1883
Two members of the Federal Point Fishing Club, organized last season, went down the “The Rocks” at New Inlet and succeeded in landing 84 sheepshead. This was considered a fine day‘s sport.   (Star, 5-19-1883)

July 21, 1883
The storehouse of Messrs. W.E. Davis & Son, who had extensive fisheries in the vicinity, was burned to the ground. The fire destroyed all their nets, seines and other material. The building adjoining the storehouse was pulled down to save it. The fire created a big excitement among the fishermen and others on the Point, who with a whole ocean of water before them, could not stop the devouring element in its course.   (Star, 7-24-1883)

July 21, 1883
The storehouse of Messrs. W.E. David & Son was destroyed by fire at Federal Point. The Davis Company owned large fisheries in the vicinity. Destroyed in the fire were all their nets, seines and other materials, which was to prove detrimental during the upcoming fish season. The fire could be seen from Smithville across the river. Another building adjacent to the storehouse had to be pulled down.  An employee, Mr. Williamson, asleep in a room, escaped unhurt. The fire created a big excitement among the local fishermen and others on the Point. The Davis family estimated their losses at about $4,500 with about half covered by insurance.   (Star, 7-27-1883)

August 9, 1883
The contracts for furnishing the necessary material on the improvements to the Cape Fear River were opened. The following were the lowest bidders: For rattling and spun yarn, John C. Springer and N. Jacobi; for brush and cane, Ross & Lara; for stone, G.Z. French; for the building of five scows, Geo. R. Sumerell.  (Star, 8-10-1883)

August 15, 1883
The steamer MINNEHAHA offered a moonlight excursion to Federal Point on Wednesday night, August 15th. There was to be a sheepshead supper at Mayo‘s Place, also music and dancing. The round trip fare was 50 cents. She would leave the Wilmington wharf at the 8 o‘clock sharp.  (Star, 8-14-1883)

Building 'The Rocks'

Building ‘The Rocks’

August, 1883
Proposals for furnishing the necessary material for carrying on the improvements to the Cape Fear River, especially New Inlet Dam, were opened at the office of Major Henry Bacon, engineer in charge. The lowers bidders were: for brush and cane and stone – Messrs. Ross & Lara; for the building of five scows, George R. Sumerell.  VOL. I.

August 14, 1883
A moonlight excursion was offered on the steamboat PASSPORT to Federal Point. Music and dancing, Sheepshead Supper at Mayo‘s Place. Fare for round trip 50 cents. One hour at Federal Point. John W. Harper and George N. Harriss, Managers.   (Star, 8-14-1883)

September, 1883
A terrible hurricane struck the lower Cape Fear area. The destruction of Messrs. W.E. Davis & Sons fishery on Zeke‘s Island was fearful. Their loss was heavy, among which were 2200 terrapins waiting for shipment to the North, 13 gill-nets, 3 fish sheds, 25 barrels of salt mullets, 30 sacks of salt, one new boat, a lot of fish stands. etc.  VOL. I.

September 27, 1883
Messrs. W.E. Davis & Son, at their Federal Point fishery, caught over 400 large drum at one haul, averaging 40 pounds each; being pronounced the largest haul of drum on record.   (Star, 9-28-1883)

October 4, 1883
Messrs. Ross & Lara, to whom the contract was awarded for supplying stone, brush and other necessary material for filling up or closing what is known as “Corncake Inlet,” near what was formerly New Inlet, were busy making preparation to begin the work.

Their base of operation was at the Keystone Quarry, at Gander Hall, opposite Orton. A short railroad track was under construction from the quarry to the river, about 1 1⁄2 miles long. A steamer named HAROLD was due soon to do the towing of the rock to the work site. Mr. Henry Bacon, Sr., a civilian employee of the U.S. Engineers, was building a large wharf at Gander Hall to facilitate the work.   (Star, 10-4-1883)

October 15, 1883
The steam tug, HAROLD, Capt. Crawford, from Jacksonville, FL, arrived in the Cape Fear River. She was to be used by Messrs. Ross & Lara, the contractors at work at filling up “Corncake Inlet” with stone and brush.   (Star, 10-16-1883)

October 21, 1883
Messrs. Ross & Lara, contractors, were receiving shipments of lumber at Gander hall for the erection of “shanties” for the men working in the Keystone quarry at that place. Work on the short line of railroad was also underway.   (Star, 10-21-1883; 11-15-1883; 10-9-1882)

The Federal Point Club prospected on Zeke‘s Island, examining the dam, fish weir, etc., and they traveled down as far as Corn-Cake Inlet.   (Star, 10-12-1882)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1884
(advertisement) 100 Good Quarry Hands for Government Work at Keystone Quarries on Cape Fear River, 14 miles below Wilmington. Ross & Lara, Contractors   (Star, 2-3-1884)

[Editor note, 2015: Keystone Quarry was located within Gander Hall [300 acres]. The quarry rail-line and loading pier on east shore of Cape Fear River, ran along what was later used by Capt Harper for the Carolina Beach Landing Pier and the Shoo-Fly Line.]

May 14, 1884
(advertisement) – FOR RENT – Until November 1, 1884, or longer, two very nice Cottages, at the Rocks, (Federal Point), Kitchen, Water, etc. to each. All in No. 1 order and ready for immediate use.  (Star, 5-14-1884)

May 28, 1884
Mr. A. S. Lara, of the firm of Ross & Lara, contractors for the work of closing Corncake Inlet, at the mouth of the river, who had been visiting at his home in Stuanton, VA.for about two months had returned.   (Star, 5-30-1884)

June 21, 1884
The locomotive used by Messrs. Ross & Lara on their railroad from the rock quarry to the river, in supplying rock to close up Corncake Inlet, was returned to the quarry after it was enlarged to suit the work by Messrs. Hart, Bailey & Co.’s foundry in Wilmington. (Star, 6-24-1884)

July 11, 1884
R.G. Ross, contractor, killed a rattlesnake at the rock quarry near Gander Hall, below Wilmington, which is said to have had 16 rattles. It is described as being as large as a large man‘s leg.  (Star, 7-11-1884)

July 27, 1884
“The “Rocks,” at what was formerly known as New Inlet, was now a favorite resort for fishermen.   (Star, 7-27-1840)

July, 1884
It was reported that the “rocks” was a favorite resort for fishermen.  VOL. I

The Rocks

The Rocks

August, 1884
A little girl from Wilmington was hurt at the “Rocks” when she jumped into some broken glass with her bare feet. She was given first aid by some nearby fishermen and then carried to the Mayo House, a resort hotel operated at the “Rocks.” During the same month two young ladies from Wilmington were rescued from drowning while swimming at the “Rocks.”  VOL. I

August 16, 1884
During a severe storm at the “Rocks,” lightning struck the flag pole at the government wharf at Corncake Inlet. A fisherman nearby was severely shocked and one of his hands badly bruised when he fell down. He was holding a metal-ribbed umbrella at the time which acted as a conductor.  VOL. I

September, 1884
Two new contracts were awarded for supplying stone for the further closing of what was known as Corncake Inlet. A total of 30,000 tons of stone was still required.  VOL. I

September 26, 1884
The new work at Federal Point was progressing rapidly. The dam was now two miles long, reaching from Zeke‘s Island to the Big Marsh, 25,000 tons of stone had already been used, and the dam, on an average, was about one foot above low water. The appropriation made by the last Congress would not quite complete the work. Mr. Henry Bacon believed that when the present dam was completed, a sandbar would form between it and the ocean, the same as at New Inlet, and the result would be the washing out of the bar at the mouth of the river to 18 or 10 feet.   (Star, 10-14-1884)

October, 1884
A correspondent in Washington, D.C. wrote: “The new work is progressing rapidly. The dam is two miles long, reaching from Zeke‘s Island to the Big Marsh, 25,000 tons of stone had already been used, and the dam, on the average, is about one foot above low water. The appropriations made by the last Congress will not quite complete the work.”  VOL. I

October 15, 1884
The New Inlet Dam was in perfect condition. The sand beach which since the completion of the dam had been extending on the site of Carolina Shoals from near Fort Fisher towards the head of Smith‘s Island had widened and it extended nearly to the island, a distance of nearly two miles, leaving a gap of less than half a mile over shoal water between the new bank and Smith‘s Island.  (Star, 10-17-1884)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

January 19, 1885
The steamer WOODBURY, belonging to the government works, which went ashore at Federal Point during the late gale got off on the next high tide and went up to Wilmington.   (Star, 1-20-1885)

~~~~~~~~~~~~

May 18, 1886
(advertisement) “THE ROCKS,” FORT FISHER. This delightful 1 family resort, unsurpassed on the entire Atlantic Coast for River, Bay, Sound and Ocean Sailing. Fishing and Boating, is now open for the accommodation of boarders by the day, week or month. Steamers PASSPORT and LOUISE ply daily between Wilmington and “The Rocks.” Address all communications, N. F.Parker, “The Rocks,” Care of Capt. John W. Harper, Wilmington, N.C.   (Star, 5-18-1886)

July 7, 1886
A license was issued to N. F. Parker to retail spirituous liquors at “The Rocks.”  (Star, 7-7-1886)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

January 12, 1888
Capt. James Wells, who has charge of Messrs. W.F. Davis & Sons fishery on Zeke‘s Island, was seriously wounded while hunting. His gun fell and both barrels were discharged and he was wounded in the left thigh with the flesh torn from the bone. While hunting he was accompanied by Mr. Willie Mayo of the “Rocks”. Capt. Wells was taken to Wilmington on the steamer LOUISE and then taken to his home where he received the necessary surgical attention.   (Star 1-13-1888)

May 8, 1888
A license was granted to A.B. Peterson to retail spirituous liquors in the Mayo House at the ‘Rocks’ for six months.   (Messenger, 5-8-1888)

May 17, 1888
A large party of gentlemen got off the steamer PASSPORT at “The Rocks” at 6:45 A.M., and they had fine sport catching sheepshead, pig fish and blackfish. Mr. W.E. Mayo had opened the hotel at “The Rocks” and was supplying the guests with all kinds of seafood, soft crabs, fish, clams, etc. “She certainly knows how to make it pleasant for all who pay her a visit.”  (Messenger, 5-18-1888)

August 21, 1888
The old tram road at the Ross rock quarry on the Cape Fear River had been purchased by a Mr. Williams, of Red Springs, N.C. The iron was to be used in building a road from Red Springs to McNeill‘s. All of the wheelbarrows, spades, shovels, drills, etc., were to be sold in a few days at auction.   (Messenger, 8-21-1888)

August 28, 1888
All the implements from the old Ross rock quarry railroad, viz: 75 wheelbarrows, 20 steel drills, 7 iron bars, 50 drill hammers, 40 pickaxes, 75 shovels, 20 sets of harness, grindstones, and a large quantity of other goods pertaining to railroad building, were to be auctioned at Davis‘ fish house today.   (Messenger, 8-26-1888)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

April 26, 1889
Capt. B.L. Perry, the former proprietor of the Purcell House in Wilmington, and  the Atlantic Hotel at Beaufort, NC, was to take charge of the hotel at Carolina Beach. Twenty rooms were to be added to the hotel, which in addition to the eight cottages being built, would accommodate a large number of visitors.  A line of hacks will be established between Carolina Beach and Fort Fisher,  a distance of 5 miles, giving  ample opportunity to everyone who desired to fish at the “Rocks.”   (Star, 4-26-1889)

August 31, 1889
A party of fishermen reported great luck at the Corn Cake Rocks and in the vicinity of Federal  Point.  They camped on the shell banks and caught shrimp in the vicinity to bait with. They caught about two barrels of tine sheepshead and the finest pig fish ever seen on this coast.  Many of the sheepshead were so heavy they broke off the hook before they could be gotten to the top.  One of the pig fish caught was 12 inches long, and another fisherman landed a rock fish that measured 2 1/2 feet in length.  Pig fish and sheepshead also bit well at New Inlet  Rocks.

The  fishermen while  near Buzzard’s Bay obtained some very fine oysters and a royal roast was consequently  enjoyed.  The oysters of Buzzard’s Bay are large and fat. It was a sure bet that the fishermen would return at an early date.   (Messenger, 8-31-1889)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

April 18, 1890
Mrs. W.E. Mayo, who kept the hotel at the “Rocks” for many years, was to have charge of the hotel at Carolina Beach this season.    (Star, 4-18-1890)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

April 12, 1891
Mr. Henry Bacon, Sr. died at his residence in Wilmington. He was born in Natick, Mass, in 1822. His engineering career commenced in New England, and later on he was appointed to the charge of harbor work on the Great Lakes. From there Mr. Bacon came to the Cape Fear River at the request of Col. Craighill in January, l876, just at the commencement of the lower river improvements. For a few years he lived at Smithville, coming to Wilmington about 1889.

For over 15 years he had charge of the Cape Fear River improvements to which he devoted the best years of his life. The work under his charge had been very successful the depth of the river having been increased gradually from 7 1/2 to 12 feet, then to 16 feet, and work had already begun on a depth of 20 feet. He was survived by his widow, two daughters and four sons. Funeral will be held from the First Presbyterian Church in Wilmington.   (Star, 4-17-1891)

May 28, 1892
The contract for furnishing stone for the jetties and other government work on the Cape Fear River, was awarded to the Carolina Brown Stone Company, of Sanford, N.C.   (Messenger, 5-29-1892)

~~~~~~~~~~~

January 12, 1893
The New Hanover Transit Company had leased the well known “Rocks” and proposed to make it both accessible and a pleasant place to visit for all who indulge in the sport of fishing. The “Rocks” had always been a good fishing spot, but hard to reach, and an uncomfortable and dreary place to remain overnight.

Capt. J.W. Harper and his company planned to build a new wharf and open a small but clean and neat house, where good meals would always be served and comfortable quarters found at night. The new house was to be called “Hotel Fisher,” and was to be opened after May 1st.   (Messenger, 1-13-1893)

January 21, 1893
Capt. John W. Harper, of the steamer WILMINGTON, reported that at Fort Fisher where the river is two miles wide, ice extended from shore to shore. This was the first time since 1857, according to the oldest inhabitants, that the Cape Fear River had frozen over in that vicinity.   VOL 11.

February 4, 1893
The New Hanover Transit Company was building their dock at the “Rocks,” preparatory for the summer season. Mr. Wesley Corbett had the contract.    (Messenger, 2-4-1893)

Steamer Wilmington</i

Steamer Wilmington

April, 1893
The steamer WILMINGTON ran ashore at “The Rocks.” The tugboat ALEXANDER JONES took her passengers off and carried them on to Southport. The WILMINGTON got off without assistance on the high tide.  VOL 11.

April 9, 1893
The New Hanover Transit Company completed their new wharf at The Rocks, and everything was now “safe and sound” for all who visited that resort when they pursued their piscatorial pursuits. It was to be remembered that at this resort “the fish were as hungry as wolves, as is shown by their savage manner in which they attack the shrimps and sand-fiddlers.”

The steamer WILMINGTON, with Capt. “Baseball” Harper in command, left Wilmington daily at 9:30 a.m., returning in the afternoon, stopping at The Rocks both ways, and this gave the anglers about five hours for indulging in their great sport.

About May 1st, the overnight accommodations were to be ready for those who wished to spend a night or two at The Rocks.   (Wilm Star, 4-9-1893)

Bill-Reaves-Carolina-Beach-The-Oceanic-Hotel-Rocks-May-15-1893May 15, 1893
The Hotel Oceanic, at Carolina Beach, opened for the entertainment of the public. The building had been thoroughly repaired, and supplied with new furniture, bedding and other necessary equipment. The hotel was under the general supervision of Mrs. W.E. Mayo.

A band of music had been engaged, the bath houses had been refitted and new bathing suits provided. Three trips to the Beach daily was to be made by the steamers WILMINGTON and CLARENCE.

The steamer CLARENCE was also to make daily trips to the Hotel Fisher at “The Rocks,” which was soon to open under the management of Mr. Oscar Sorensen. At this fisherman’s paradise a person could spend five hours and return in the afternoon, or one could spend one or more nights with host Sorensen and have time to haul out trout, sheepshead and flounders.   (Star, 4-21-1893)

May 26, 1893
Wilmingtonians who have stopped with Mr. Sorrensen, the manager of the Hotel Fisher, at The Rocks, speak in high praise of the “good cheer” he provides for his guests.  (Star, 5-26-1893)

October 13, 1893
During the terrible hurricane very minor damage was done to the buildings, bath houses or residences on Carolina Beach, with the exception of fences, which were generally blown down or washed away. A few of the residences had their doors forced open and some panes of glass were blown in. The only damage of consequence was to the railroad track which had been badly washed at several points between the beach and the river. The pier leading out into the river was, however, all gone, except the pilings; the entire superstructure with ties and rails, having been washed away.

The storm raged with great fury at “The Rocks.” Six small cottages were demolished and swept away, the wharf being destroyed, and much damage was done to the fishing boats and nets. Mr. Hans A. Kure lost seines, nets, boats, and other articles belonging to his fishery.   (Star, 10-15-1893)

October 14, 1893
During the recent terrible storm, fears were entertained for the safety of two men in charge of the Government Wharf at Corncake Inlet. When last seen they were on the wharf and the waves were washing over it. They were surrounded on all sides by water. The men are the watchman, Mr. George W. Hewett, and Nelson McCoy, the colored cook.   (Messenger, 10-14-1893)

October 15, 1893
Hans A. Kure was advertising that he had lost the following: LOST, during the storm Friday, at “The Rocks,” two large seines, sixteen gill nets forty meshes deep, eight boats and a number of gears belonging to my fishery. Also one “pike” net.   (Star, 10-15-1893)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

May 31, 1895
A wharf was to be erected at the “Rocks” in place of the old one which was carried away in a recent storm.   (Star, 5-31-1895)

May 31, 1895
It was announced that a new wharf was to be erected at the “Rocks” in place of the old one that was carried away. The wharf was needed by the steamer WILMINGTON to land fishing parties and to facilitate the government work on that part of the river.   (Star, 5-31-1895)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The RocksMay, 1896
About 50 feet of sand at the upper end of the breakwater dam closing New Inlet had washed out. The break was being repaired by filling in with bags of sand.  Vol. II

March, 1897
Capt. D.S. Bender, in charge of the government work, reported that it would require ten to fifteen days more to finish the repairing of the New Inlet Dam (“Rocks”). The break occasioned by a recent storm was not only being made good, but the dam was being further strengthened, and extended at the east end so as to extend well over on the sand reaches. About 25 men were on this work.   (Star, 3-5-1897)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

May 12, 1898
A number of men from Fort Macon, N.C. went down the river on the steamer WILMINGTON on their way to Corn Cake Inlet. They were to erect a battery to defend the inlet which makes in at the upper end of Smith’s Island. The inlet was large enough now to admit small steamers such as torpedo boats and torpedo boat destroyers.   (Messenger, 5-13-1898; Dispatch, 5-12-1898)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

September 21, 1899
The stone dam (Rocks) between Zeke’s Island and the Big Marsh was damaged by the recent hurricane. The force of the waves knocked the coping to the dam down in several places. Allen Clemmons with a small force of eight men had been at work the past week, putting the rocks back in place.   (Messenger, 9-22-1899)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

January 10, 1900
The government was to use the rock which was dug up in dredging the Wilmington shoal in making repairs to the “rock dam” (The Rocks) at the mouth of the river.  (Dispatch, 1-10-1900)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

May 17, 1902
A sturgeon, 7 feet long and weighing over 300  pounds, was caught at “The Rocks”  and taken to Wilmington on the steamer WILMINGTON. The fish was a monster.   (Dispatch, 5-17-1902)

March 1, 1902
Capt. John W. Harper was contemplating the erection of a pier head at “The Rocks” near Fort Fisher. He gave the contract to Mr. A.J. Robbins, of Southport, and the work was to be completed by April 15th.   (Dispatch, 3-8-1902)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

August 12, 1905
R.H. Pickett and Roger Moore laid claim to 20 acres of vacant and unappropriated land in Federal Point Township, known as Zekes Island, which land was bounded by the water of the Cape Fear River and New Inlet.  Entered in the office of the Register of Deeds of New Hanover County, Entry No. 1901.   (Messenger, 8-13-1905)

August 28, 1905
Through his attorneys, Messrs. Davis & Davis, Capt. J. Alvin Walker made a formal protest against Messrs. Pickett and Moore who were claiming Zeke‘s Island property. The property was claimed by the Walker heirs and they resisted the occupation of the island by Messrs. Pickett & Moore.   (Star, 8-29-1905)

March 28, 1906
The entry of Zeke‘s Island by Messrs. Roger Moore and R. H. Pickett, of Wilmington, was upset at a hearing in Brunswick County Superior Court in behalf of the Walker heirs, the original claimants.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

April 20, 1906
The recent storm resulted in more damage to the government breakwater known as ‘the Rocks.’ A member of the Corps of Engineers, following an inspection, stated that the damage done was almost beyond comprehension. There was scarcely 100 feet of the New Inlet dam which was not damaged.

In the two dams, the New Inlet Dam, and the Swash Deference Dam, there were a number of breaks from 50 feet to about 500 feet. The entire stone coping of the New Inlet dam was completely destroyed by the terrific force of the wind and waves. The stone coping was composed of tremendous stone blocks weighing from 2 to 6 tons each. Some of these were thrown by the wind from 25 to 50 feet from their original position. The only thing that saved the Swash Defense Dam from being completely obliterated was the fact that the stone coping was cemented and it resisted the attacking power of wind and wave.

Prior to the storm, $60,000 worth of improvements had recently been added to the work on the dams, and all of this will prove a total loss as it will all have to be fixed again. The stone coping alone on the New Inlet Dam would cost $50,000 to replace.   (Dispatch, 9-20-1906)


July, 1906

A launch CLIFTON was making regular runs from Wilmington to ‘The Rocks’ for fishermen.

July 25, 1906.
The launch CLIFFORD was to be used for fishing expeditions from Wilmington to ‘The Rocks’. Anglers would be taken down in the morning and returned in the afternoon.  (Dispatch, 7-25-1906)

October, 1906
The government secured five lighter loads of cobblestones from the streets of Wilmington to be used in the repair work on ‘The Rocks.’ The streets were being repaired with ‘Belgian Blocks.’

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

July 30, 1908
The CHARLOTTE OBSERVER wrote about “The Rocks” and in the article they mentioned that “The length of the dam from Federal Point to Zeke‘s Island is one mile, but the extension of Zeke‘s Island jetties to Smith‘s Island made the line much longer.

The rock foundation of this wall was from 90 feet to 120 feet wide at the base, and for three-fourths of the line the average depth of the stone wall is 30 feet from the top of the dam. In some places it is 36 feet deep. A better idea of the vastness of the undertaking may be gained from the fact that the rock used in this great structure would build a solid wall eight feet high, four feet thick, extending from Charlotte to Greensboro and one mile beyond.   (Star, 7-30-1908)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

June 12, 1922
Edmund Alexander, of Wilmington, was promoting the idea of a ferry from Fort Fisher to Southport. He suggested the improvement of the road from Fort Fisher to the end of Federal Point, a distance of two miles, and at a point where the government dam known as ‘The Rocks’ begins. He suggested of the building of a small wharf and shelter at Federal Point for safely handling passengers. He reported that the distance from the wharf to Southport by ferry would be five miles.   (Star, 6-12-1922)

 

July 3, 1922
Mr. Edmund Alexander received the endorsement of the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce and Rotary Club for repairing the two miles of road between Fort Fisher and Federal Point.  As soon as the road was repaired and a river landing  arranged, the  managers of the Carolina Bus Line indicated their willingness to aid in the undertaking by making connection with the passenger yacht plying  between Federal Point and Southport.

Captain W.E. Fountain, of Southport, had  recently purchased a handsomely  equipped passenger yacht of Mr. McClammy, of Wilmington, and was willing to run in connection with the bus line.  The yacht had every convenience and a trip  from the “Rocks” to Southport, over the broadest part of the Cape Fear River and within sight and sound of the ocean, would indeed be a delightful recreation.

It was now up to the citizens of Brunswick and New  Hanover counties to establish a connecting link between the southern portions of the two counties.    (Dispatch, 7-10-1922)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From Battery Buchanan out to The Rocks

From Battery Buchanan out to
The Rocks

May 2, 1923
Capt. Edgar D. Williams, one of the leaders in the movement for conversion of the battleground at Fort Fisher into a national park, reported that certain parties were claiming considerable property within the boundaries of the old fort.

One of the parties claimed that his title to the property was based upon a land grant which was granted on payment of 12 1⁄2 cents an acre for the property.   (News 6-2-1923)

~~~~~~~~~~~~

April 18, 1933
Plans for repair of the Swash Defense and New Inlet dams were started as Wilmington District army engineers opened bids on a contract to supply 400 tons of stone that will be used in the work. The Raleigh Granite Company, of Raleigh, submitted the lowest bid. It was $2.35 a ton, delivered.  Work was to begin early in May.   (News, 4-19-1933)

July 25, 1933
Repairs to be Swash Defense and New Inlet dams were expected to be completed in two weeks. Several carloads of cement and rock had been used in the work.   (News, 7-25-1933)

~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Rocks2April 26, 1937
A petition for a semi-improved road extending from Fort Fisher Beach to “The  Rocks”, signed by 70  citizens, was presented to the Board of County commissioners to be forwarded to the State Highway and Public Works
Commission.

The  petitioners were not asking for a standardized highway, but were seeking  a semi-improved roadway, so that “The  Rocks” could be made more accessible for  the many anglers from Wilmington and New Hanover County.   (News, 4-27-1937)

~~~~~~~~~~~

1950
The U.S. Corps of Engineers applied a coat of cement to the top of “The  Rocks” for added protection.   (Star, 3-18-1971)

 


[Additional Resources]

‘The Rocks’ Arial View:  Fort Fisher to Zeke’s Island to Bald Head
Google Maps: ‘The Rocks
Images: Zeke’s Island
The Rocks – by Susan Taylor Block
Zeke’s Island – NC Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve

StarNews – Sunday,  August 30, 2015
Editorial – Rocks solid

Coastal Review Online – Beach and Inlet Management:  8/28/15
Senate Plan for ‘The Rocks’ Still Unknown

StarNews 7/29/15:
Remove ‘The Rocks’?

The Closing of New Inlet (The Rocks) 1870-1881
by Sandy Jackson: Federal Point Historical Society

Lumina News 7/14/15:
Rock wall removal could cause shoaling in shipping channel, some say

NC Rep. Michael Lee proposes doing away with “The Rocks”
Excerpted from StarNews Article by Gareth McGrath, April 28, 2015

 

Federal Point Chronology 1725 – 1994

Compiled By Bill Reaves

Published by:

New Hanover Public Library &

Federal Point Historic Preservation Society

Wilmington, NC

2011

Bill Reaves - Carolina Beach 1946

Carolina Beach, 1946 — Courtesy, New Hanover County Public Library

The chronology was originally compiled by Bill Reaves (1934 – 2000) who typed it on index cards. Upon his death, the collection was given to the North Carolina Room of the New Hanover County Public Library.

The library shared the typed index cards with the Federal Point Historic Preservation Society whose volunteers typed the 285 page manuscript. Ann Hewlett Hutteman prepared the index for the Federal Point Chronilogy.

The cover photo (below) depicts Carolina Beach in 1897. It is taken from a pamphlet published by The Wilmington Chamber of Commerce entitled New Hanover County, The Sub-Tropical Region of the Old North State (New Hanover County Public Library, Special Collection #92).

The information was gathered from many sources; however the majority of it was taken from Mr. Reaves’ vast newspaper collection.

The entire PDF file (3.8 Mb), the “Bill Reaves – Federal Point Chronology” downloadable here: Bill Reaves – Federal Point Chronology 1728-1994.pdf   The file is presented in chronological order starting in 1728.

If you download the file, using tools such as Adobe Reader or Apple Preview, the large Chronology PDF file can be keyword searchable.

About this web-based version of the Chronology:
The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society used the entire contents of the original 2011 Federal Point Chronology PDF file – breaking the PDF document into pages based on year.  All pages and all articles of the original PDF are included in this web version of the Federal Point Chronology.

The right column on these pages provides access to complete yearly segments of the Chronology.  In addition, this website’s ‘Search’ functionality, located on the top right of every page, provides an excellent capability for searching through all of the documents/pages of this website.

Helpful hint: If searching by ‘Search’ on this website (located on top right of all pages), when opening any of the ‘Search’ retrieved pages, you can then use your browser’s ‘Find’ command – (Ctrl F or Cmd F) to search within that web-page or document.

Bill Reaves - Cover - CB 1897

Carolina Beach in 1897 — (Click to enlarge)

 

 

 

What is – The Bill Reaves Collection?

The Bill Reaves Collection – Introduction

The Reaves Collection, compiled by Bill Reaves, of Wilmington, North Carolina, was donated by him to the North Carolina Room of the New Hanover County Public Library during the 1990’s.

The collection came about in 1971 when Mr. Reaves was an employee of the Wilmington Star-News and keeper of the “newspaper morgue.” When the company decided to have 100+ years of newspapers destroyed, he was, to a large extent, able to personally salvage them. The bound volumes of newspapers found their way to his home and from there began a most unusual collection of Lower Cape Fear historical and genealogical materials, a compilation which consumed the rest of his life.

Bill Reaves - Carolina Beach The Oceanic Hotel - Rocks - May 15 1893Bill Reaves spent nearly thirty years clipping the old newspapers, and then dating, cross-indexing and filing the clippings. Mr. Reaves generated individual file folders for local history subjects, local buildings, local addresses, local organizations and family (surname) files. He then organized the clippings within some of the folders chronologically and in some cases proceeded to type up extracts of the information.

The organized folders then became the basis for his many publications. Some clippings date back to the mid and late 1800’s.

While the bulk of this clipping collection dates from 1860 through 1960, Mr. Reaves also added clippings from the newspapers of the 1970’s, 80’s and 90’s, as well as various interesting, and often surprising, ephemera he collected as a champion of local history over the years. These folders have benefited numerous museums, galleries, researchers, genealogists and historical institutions around the state and country.

It is important to understand that the Wilmington newspapers reported events happening not only in New Hanover County but also in the surrounding counties – Brunswick, Duplin, Pender, Onslow, Columbus, Bladen, Sampson.

All of the Reaves Collection material is located in the North Carolina Room, on the second floor of the Main New Hanover County Public Library in downtown Wilmington, North Carolina. His body of work consists of some 9,000 clipping folders, 50+ publications, and too-many-to-count typed manuscripts.

The Collection is organized into five sections: Publications (on the shelves of the North Carolina Room, New Hanover County Public Library), Block Books (clippings organized by street address), Series I Family Files chronologically organized and typed (900 surnames, bound, each surname has an individual index), Series II Family File clippings (some organized chronologically, mostly loose clippings), and Subject files (a few organized chronologically, mostly loose clippings).

Not every article was necessarily clipped and saved, nor are clippings for every newspaper issue or even every year captured in these files. Many newspaper issues were unsalvageable. Some folders contain hundreds of clippings, while others may have only two or three. Mr. Reaves was working with one set of newspapers, requiring him to assign each article to one Block Book file or one Family file or one Subject file, as well as dealing with the articles on the back side of each page as the pages were being clipped.. To partially overcome this limitation, Mr. Reaves included frequent cross-references – following these will require the researcher to examine additional FAMILY or SUBJECT files and/or refer to the available newspaper microfilms.

It was the wish of Mr. Reaves, and is the hope of the Library, that this collection will help the genealogist and historian find vital and interesting information that cannot be found elsewhere. In the search of his own family Mr. Reaves said, “I have found both famous and infamous, rich and poor, the educated and illiterate, the Union and Confederate and I cherish every ‘skeleton’ that I have found in my many closets.”

http://www.onhgs.org/reavesmain.htm

Who was – William Marion (Bill) Reaves?

Bill Reaves

Bill Reaves

William Marion (Bill) Reaves

1934-2000

William M. Reaves was born on June 3, 1934, in Newark, New Jersey, the son of the late Marion William Whitford Reaves and Florence Belle Lynk Reaves. His grandfather, Richard Martin Van Buren Reaves, was a Confederate Veteran. In 1968, Mr. Reaves became a resident of Wilmington, his father’s childhood home.

During the 1970s, he worked both as a librarian and reporter for the Wilmington Star-News, where he wrote the popular local columns, “Inside Old Wilmington” and “Looking Back.” In 1976, during the United States’ Bicentennial, he wrote an award-winning series of articles on the history of the Lower Cape Fear. Working with the Historic Wilmington Foundation, he was actively involved in Wilmington’s historic preservation movement. In the 1980s, he helped catalog the artifact and image collection of the Cape Fear Museum. He also worked for North Carolina State Historic Sites at Brunswick Town, Fort Fisher and the Town Creek Indian Mound. A popular lecturer, he taught local history at Cape Fear Community College and the New Hanover Public Library.

Bill Reaves

Bill Reaves

A noted historian, Mr. Reaves was involved in over fifty local history publications and genealogical abstracts, covering New Hanover, Brunswick, Pender and Duplin counties. A charter member of the Southport Historical Society, he wrote a remarkable four volume history of Southport. He was the author of Strength Through Struggle, The Chronological and Historical Record of the African-American Community in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1950, for which he received a national award from the American Association of State and Local History.

His works have also been honored by the North Carolina Society of County Historians, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, the Lower Cape Fear Historical Society and the Old New Hanover Genealogical Society. In 1992, the North Carolina Underwater Archeology Unit Library at Fort Fisher was dedicated as the William M. Reaves Research Room. Mr. Reaves shared his extensive newspaper clippings and other historical files with the North Carolina Room of the New Hanover Public Library. The library’s Bill Reaves Collection has benefited researchers throughout the United States.

Source: Old New Hanover Genealogical Society

 

News Articles – 1725 – 1849

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger, The Daily Journal.

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

July 14, 1725
The Lords Proprietors of the Carolinas granted to Maurice Moore the land upon which Carolina Beach is now located.

April 21, 1736
The land was sold to Thomas Merrick. He died about 1767, devising the property to his daughters, Sarah and Dorothy Merrick. Sarah later married Samuel Ashe and Dorothy married James Augustus Tabb. (Star, 6-15-1941)

 

April 21, 1736
The “Haulover” tract of land within Carolina Beach, nearly opposite Brunswick, was conveyed by Maurice Moore to Colonel Thomas Merrick.

 

August 25, 1761
In 1761, the pilot road across the beach at the “Hawl-over” was blown out by a terrific hurricane and was converted into what was to be known as “New Inlet.” (Star, 8-25-1877)

 

September 20, 1761
New Inlet was formed by a great storm, which visited the coast and lasted four days. This inlet grew in width and depth until large sailing vessels could pass through, and later steamships. VOL.I

 

January 5, 1776
The Wilmington Committee of Safety ordered that all river pilots be taken into protective custody. Vol. 1

 

1794
The land formerly owned by the Merrick family came into the possession of Peter Maxwell, and upon his death it was sold by his executors to James Telfair. (Star, 6-15-1941)

 

18th Century
Malcolm Ross, author of THE CAPE FEAR, 1965, wrote that across from Orton, on the less socially acceptable eastern shore of the estuary, lived Major Jack Wheeler, a military man and one who excelled in abusiveness. He was fond of personal fights, yet good-natured and never seriously injured anyone, except, when he indulged his fun-loving habit of carrying a forceps with which he used to extract a tooth from a prostrate antagonist. His abilities later raised him to the rank of brevet major on the battlefield of Brandywine.

 

March 11, 1802
John McFarlane gave notice in the newspaper for all persons to be forwarned and forbidden from hunting or traveling over any part of my lands, on which Mr. Jonah Clark resides, nearly opposite Brunswick, and adjoining the river, also on the lands adjoining me, near to the Sugar Loaf, the property of Peter Carpenter. Any persons or persons found trespassing thereon with dog or gun, after this notice, would be prosecuted as the law directs. (Wilm.Gazette, 3-18-1802)

 

March 24, 1802
Edward Newton gave notice in the newspaper forwarning all persons from running any lines on my land lying between and adjoining the lands of Capt. John McFarlane and Mr. Simon Sellers in New Hanover County – or hunting or traveling over any part thereof, with dog or gun, after this notice, under the penalty of law. (Wilm.Gazette, 3-25-1802)

 

July, 1804
Joseph Gardner Swift, of the U.S. Army Engineer Corps, suggested in a report to the Secretary of War in Washington, D.C. among other items that an enclosed battery be built at New Inlet, Federal Point. Vol. 1 In 1809, Engineer J.G. Swift inspected a site for the proposed fort on Federal Point, near New Inlet. Vol. 1.

 

November, 1809
Engineer Joseph G. Swift inspected a site for the proposed fort on Federal Point.

 

April 7, 1817
Charles B. Gause deeded an acre of land on Federal Point to the United State government for the erection of a light house. The deed was recorded in New Hanover County Deed Book P, page 396

 

1818
Captain Otway Burns brought the first steamboat to ply the Cape Fear River to Wilmington, passing through the New Inlet, coming from Beaufort, N.C. (The Scene Magazine, Wilmington, N.C.)

 

May 28, 1830
Mrs. Mary Newton, 68, wife of Joseph Newton, died.

August 19, 1835
William Grissom, 65 years old, died at Federal Point, after an illness of 11 days. He had been a resident of Federal Point for about 40 years. He was survived by his wife and nine children (Peoples Press and Wilm Advertiser, 8-28-1835)

 

May 1, 1837
Proposals were requested to build a lighthouse and dwelling house at Federal Point. (Wilm. Newspaper, 5-1-1937)

 

April 6, 1842
It was reported from New Inlet, Federal Point, that an accident occurred there on March 31, which caused the instantaneous death of two men; Jonathan Derby Wilson, of Lowell, Mass. and Nehemiah Healey, of Waterville, Maine. A number of men were engaged in launching the schooner Susan and Benjamin, a vessel that had gone ashore there, and when she was nearly afloat, a heavy swell of the sea threw her over crushing the two to death.

 

August, 1842
The schooner Venus which went ashore near the Federal Point light, some weeks since, being bound hence to Philadelphia, was got off last week and towed up to town. It is said she is not at all injured in the hull. (Wilmington Chronicle, 8-17-1842)

 

February 27, 1843
A deed was made transferring property from Joseph Newton, Jr. to Thomas Craig, Jr. …for sum of $200… all that tract or parcel of land on Federal Point in the county of New Hanover…100 acres, more or less, to Benjamin Craig‘s north corner. (NEW HANOVER COUNTY DEED BOOK Z, PAGE 574, Registered March 25, 1843)

 

March 1, 1843
The dwelling house of Mr. Joseph Newton, at Federal Point, this county, was destroyed by fire a few days since, at an early hour in the morning. A negro man belonging to one of Mr. Newton‘s neighbors was examined before a magistrate here ion the charge of having set fire to it, but nothing was proved and he was released. (Wilmington Chronicle, 3-1-1843)

 

October 21, 1843
Mrs. Clarisse Newton, 30, wife of James Newton, died on Federal Point. Vol. 1.

 

January 5, 1844
A deed was made transferring property from Benjamin Craig to Thomas Craig, Jr…. for sum of $50…being in the county of New Hanover on Federal Point, beginning at Thomas Craig, Jr, line, thnce running down the river the distance of one acre in width to Simon Grissom‘s line…to the seashore thence with the sea beach…containing three acres. (NEW HANOVER COUNTY DEED BOOK AA, page 271, Registered March 25, 1844)

 

June 4, 1845
Joseph Newton, 82 years old, died at Federal Point, New Hanover County. (Wilmington Chronicle, 6-19-1845)

July 15, 1848
Mrs. Effie Grissom, 72 years old, died at Federal Point. (Wilmington Chronicle, July 26, 1848)

 

September 10, 1845
We understand the federal government contemplates erecting a battery at Federal Point, at a cost of about $18,000; and that an appropriation for that purpose will be made by the next Congress. That such work is needed everyone who is entitled to an opinion must admit No one need require a stronger argument, of the necessity of such a work than the United States has afforded by fortifying the main bar at the mouth of the river. That system of defense is certainly incomplete which only guards one entrance into the river; and to refrain from perfecting the system for the paltry sum of $18,000 or $20,000, is certainly to be penny wise and pound foolish. (Wilmington Chronicle, 9-10-1845)

 

February 10, 1849
A deed was made transferring property from Thomas Craig to Jesse Craig Sr… for the sum of $900…Land lying and being on Federal Point…including a small piece or parcel of land on which the Dwelling House stands…100 acres more or less. (NEW HANOVER COUNTY DEED BOOK FF, page 578, March 28, 1849)

 

November 9, 1849.
A deed was made transferring property from Simon S. Grissom to Jesse Craig…for the sum of (not given)…being in the county of New Hanover, commencing at, Jesse Craig Sr.‘s north line and running easterly to the sea at low water mark thence running in a northern direction to Simon Grissom‘s south line, thence back to the River, containing 100 acres more or less… (NEW HANOVER COUNTY DEED BOOK GG, page 478, registered Jan. 8, 1850)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

News Articles – 1850 – 1864

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger, The Daily Journal, Wilmington, N C.

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

December 10, 1850
James Newton, 76, died.

December 27, 1850
Isaac Newton, 33, son of James Newton, died.

September 29, 1851
John J. Newton, 49 years old, died at his residence on Federal Point, New Hanover County, after a painful illness of almost 16 months. Buried in Federal Point Cemetery. (The Daily Journal, 10-6-1851)

 

1853
William H. King was appointed Fumigator at Federal Point by the Commissioners of Navigation. (Wilmington Commercial, 5-7-1853)

 

September 7, 1853
Mr. Julius H. Dozier, of Smithville, N.C., married Miss Hester Ann Newton, at Federal Point, with J. G. Pickett, Esq, officiating. (Wilmington Commercial, 9-15-1853)

October 17, 1856
Hester Ann Elizabeth Dozier, wife of Julius Dozier, died. She was born June 14, 1834. Internment was on Federal Point. Vol. 1.

 

1855
The Lighthouse Board recommended that the Cape Fear Lighthouse be made a fixed flashing light to distinguish it from the Federal Point Lighthouse, about 8 miles away.

 

October 17, 1856
Hester Ann Elizabeth Doshier, wife of Julius Doshier, died and was buried on Federal Point. She was born June 14, 1834.

 

May 27, 1861
General Theophilus Holmes was ordered to take charge of coast defenses from New River in Onslow County to the South Carolina line. He engaged engineers, constructors, laborers, materials and went to work building up the defenses in his department. Fort Fisher was begun at this time. Vol. 1

 

September 7, 1861
General Joseph R. Anderson, of Virginia, was ordered to take charge of the defenses around Wilmington. He had only 4,669 men present for duty in his district. He dispersed the men available to eight different points, one of which was Camp Wyett with 740 men and Confederate Point with 85 men. Vol.1

 

October, 1861
Company B., 36th Regiment, N.C. Troops, (Second Regiment, N.C. Artillery) was assigned to man the battery on Zeke‘s Island, Cape Fear River.
1862

The Light Boat, which was taken from the Frying Pan Shoals, was anchored opposite Fort Anderson with four guns mounted aboard it. The Light Boat from the Horse Shoe Shoals was anchored inside Zeke‘s Island with four guns mounted.

 

October 8, 1862
Sterling F. Newton died. Born April 7, 1834. Internment was on Federal Point. Vol.1

August 2, 1864
Mr. John L. Newton, aged 23 years, died at Confederate Point. (The Daily Journal, 8-9-1864

August 2, 1864
John L. Newton died. Born August 13,1839. Internment was on Federal Point. Vol.1.

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

News Articles – 1865 – 1870

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger, The Daily Journal, Wilmington, N C.

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

February 15, 1865
Two divisions of Union General Schofield‘s army were ferried across the Cape Fear River from Federal Point to Smithville, and there they were joined by an additional brigade, all under the command of Major General Jacob D. Cox. The plan was for a combined army-navy attack on Fort Anderson. Vol.1

 

February 17, 1865
Major General Cox‘s troops marched out of Smithville. About 3 miles outside of the town, Confederate pickets started a running skirmish and continued until Major Cox‘s force was within 2 miles of Fort Anderson. Here Cox opened communications with Admiral Porter‘s force on the river.

 

July 28, 1865
Sterling L. Newton died. Born April 1, 1865. Internment was on Federal Point. Vol. 1

 

October 12, 1865
John W. Newton died. Born April 10, 1860. Internment on Federal Point. Vol.1.

 

November 1, 1865
A deed was made transferring property from Charles W. Craig to Henry Howard…for the sum of $200…situated on the Cape Fear River in Federal Point District, beginning at the river at Jesse Craig Sr.‘s south line and running in an easterly direction to the sea at low water mark…containing 82 acres…

 

1866
Cape Fear (Bald Head) Lighthouse was extinguished because a new lighthouse had been erected on Federal Point.

 

July 23, 1866
A deed was made transferring property from Jesse Craig to Charles W. Craig…for the sum of $100…situated on the Cape Fear River in Federal Point District, to John H. Burriss‘s south line…50 acres more or less… (NEW HANOVER COUNTY DEED BOOK TT, page 376, registered July 30, 1866)

 

September 25, 1866
Mrs. Elizabeth Newton, 81, died.

 

February 9, 1867
We are informed on reliable authority that there is now in possession of Mr. E.A. Grissom, a gentleman residing in the vicinity of Fort Fisher, a young cow – for cow she must be, although little more than a calf – that was born in April 1865, was nurtured by its mother until July 1866 and gave birth to a calf in the month of September of the same year. This we consider one of the most remarkable incidents of the character on record and are informed that the facts we have related are undoubtedly correct.  (The Daily Journal, 2-9-1867)

 

December 13, 1868
James Newton, an old and highly respectable pilot, who was born and raised, lived and died, at Federal Point, told a member of a river improvement committee, a short time before his death a few years ago, that he well remembered the first breaking out of New Inlet during the prevalence of a long and terrific northeast gale, in the month of September, 1781; that prior to that time he had frequently walked and ridden to Bald Head beach, now Smith‘s Island. (Star, 12-13-1868)

 

December, 1869
The steamship “Lucille,” went aground near Zeke‘s Island. More than half her cargo was removed from the vessel and carried to Smithville. In drifting, part of her keel was knocked off, causing her to leak considerably.

 

1869-70
A study was begun to close the “New Inlet.” An open space of two miles between Federal Point and Smith Island beach where the beach was wearing away and where navigation was almost destroyed was given a great deal of attention. (Star 8-25-1877)

 

January 20, 1870
A report was made of the soundings on New Inlet Bar:
South slue on Bar – 9 1⁄2 Feet.
North slue on Bar – 8 feet
On Rip – 9 1⁄2 feet. (Star, 1-23-1870)

 

October 3, 1870
The fish oil works began operations at Fort Fisher as a sufficient number of little fatbacks had been obtained. The plant is operated by the Navassa Guano Company. About eighty barrels of the little fish were caught at one haul, and this was enough to yield six barrels of oil. Another haul was expected soon. (Star 10-5-1870)

 

1870
Anthony A. Hawes © offered his resignation as a member of the School Committee for Federal Point Township, which was accepted, and R.B. Freeman © was appointed in his place. (Star, 12-7-1870)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

News Articles – 1871

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

June 9, 1871
Henry Nutt reported the completion of the work across Deep Inlet, the northern end of the finished super-structure resting firmly upon the highest part of the old stone work at a point designated upon the plan of the government works, near Zeke‘s Island , as the cross, thus effectually sealing up this inlet in a substantial and permanent manner.

When we take into consideration the formidable character of this work, an opening of about or over 500 feet, requiring a superstructure over 600 feet lineal by 20 feet wide and over 40 feet high, to shut out or stop a current of water passing in and out at a rate of 8 or 10 miles an hour, and all of this to be accomplished within the short space of about 8 months, and at a cost of within the sum of $100,000, the skill and industry of the officers in charge who designed the executed this great work, should receive the high appreciation of all. (Star, 6-11-1871)

 

June 11, 1871
Henry Nutt reported that the experiments for collecting drift sand and thereby elevating the beach in low parts of it, has not been made in consequence of financial deficiency. The first imperfect experiment has acted well, and accomplished all that was expected of it, elevating the beach above storm tide, thus proving the feasibility of building up the beach to any desired height by judicious treatment at small cost.  (Star, 6-11-1871)

 

September 2, 1871
A report issued on this date mentioned that the beach south of the government works was growing. The catch-sand fences had proven successful. Not a rail had been removed by the recent storm, and the brush had been completely covered with sand to the top of the fence, presenting an embankment 3 to 5 feet high, and far above the reach of any tide. This, and the weak parts of the beach where the wind had blown out trenches between the hills, was now being strengthened by a system of cultivating the “beach grass.”. This grass bore transplanting well; none of that which was set out in July and August had died; but all growing and doing well, and it was suggested that transplanting could be done at any season of the year. Where the “beach grass” was planted, it had not only successfully resisted the blowing away of sand, but has already collected, it at many places, a foot or over in height. (Star, 9-8-1871)

 

Between August 12 and Sept. 2, 1871 …. Federal Point
A most violent northeast gale visited the coast, producing some apprehension, according to Henry Nutt, for the safety of the government works in progress, and later during the month, much rainy weather prevailed, retarding operations somewhat. From the violence of the storm some of the unfinished cribs and preparatory timber was displaced, which involved some loss of time and labor to replace them in position again. This was successfully and speedily accomplished through the energy and skill of the local superintendent, and all is now going on well again. (Star, 9-6-1871)

 

September 6, 1871
A report by Henry Nutt noted that the shoals in the vicinity of the government works had somewhat changed their position. Zeke‘s Island is somewhat changed, indicating an increased low-water area, while its high water area appears diminished. There is some appearance of an increased depth of water in the small inlet south of Zeke‘s Island. (Star, 9-6-1871)

 

September 30, 1871
It is perceptible that the water is shoaling in the vicinity of the government works on both sides of it and the outer shoals were evidently moving up in a body. The point of beach is extending northward and in front of the works. The inlet south of Zeke‘s Island seems not to be effected, as its depth of water is still maintained, while Zeke‘s Island itself is gradually wearing away, and is almost covered with high tides. (Star, 10-3-1871)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

News Articles – 1872

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

January 4, 1872
C.W. Craig gave satisfactory evidence to the Local Inspectors of Steam Vessels for the District of Charleston, that he was a skillful Pilot of steam vessels and he could be entrusted to perform his duties on the Cape Fear Bar and River to Wilmington, and he was licensed to act as First Class Pilot on steam vessels for one year from this date.

 

December 3, 1872 …. Federal Point
Sale of Land for Taxes-James Newton, 400 acres inside Fort Fisher, Federal Point Township $4.80 WILM.STAR, 12-3-1872

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994