News Articles – 1913 -1914

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994

 

March 10, 1913
Mr. D. H. Winslow, the U. S. Superintendent of Road Construction, spent a few days in the southern part of the county, advising on the maintenance and construction of improved roads, discovered a stratum of shell rock reaching from a point near Carolina Beach to the end of Federal Point.

The discovery was important to the county for the rock was better adapted to road building than that mined for the purpose from the quarry east of Wilmington. It was declared harder than the rock from the quarries and had not reached the same stage of decomposition. By using this rock the proposed road to Federal Point could be built at very little cost. WILM.STAR, 3-11-1913.

 

May 19, 1913
‘A Tent City’ at Carolina Beach during the summer was the latest scheme to aid in the development of the resort. The plan was to tent more than 100 people for a period of two weeks. The scheme was by Mr. James G. Bailey, of Southport, the manager, and it had the endorsement and approval of the New Hanover Transit Company, which now controlled Carolina Beach. This summer camp scheme was much in vogue along the Long Island and New Jersey coast.

The camp site was located on the mainland beach with 50 yards of the tide line. Surf bathing was immediately at hand, followed by fresh water shower baths furnished by the camp. The charge was 15 days at the low cost of $ 12.50 per person, which included board and fishing, excursions, etc., with extra charge.

It was suggested to dress simply and the camper had to bring his own sheets, pillowcases, blankets, towels and soap. The camp management did the rest. WILM.DISP , 5-19-1913.

 

July 12, 1913
Marx. S. Nathan, of Wilmington, a former theatrical business man, was hired by the New Hanover Transit Company as special advertising director. The company owned most of Carolina Beach and they wanted to carry on an extensive advertising campaign throughout southern United States. WILM.STAR, 7-12-1913.

 

August 23, 1913
Real Estate Transfer – One of the largest land deals in the county in point of acreage for several years past was closed today when Messrs. D.L. Gore, W.K. Allen, A.W. Pate and J.J. Loughlin purchased the old Sanders or Harriss place, midway between Wilmington and Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 8-24-1913.

 

August 23, 1913
One of the largest land deals in New Hanover County for many years was when Messrs. D.L. Gore, W.K. Allen, A.W. Pate and J.J. Loughlin became the owners of the old Sanders, or Harriss, estate half way between Wilmington and Carolina Beach. The tract of land included 1,800 acres. The deal indicated that the southern part of the county was now claiming the attention of expert real estate men. WILM.DISP, 8-23-1913.

 

December 16, 1913
One of the prettiest and most attractive advertising booklets in some time had been issued by the New Hanover Transit Company, advertising Carolina Beach. The map was done handsomely in colors. It showed first an aerial perspective of the entire southern section of the county and the beach, then the northern section of Carolina Beach from Second Avenue to Myrtle Grove Sound, and finally a comprehensive map of the entire beach on a scale of 300 feet to 1 inch. Mr. Sig. Zulawsky was the sales manager of the New Hanover Transit Company, Mr. A.W. Pate was president and Mr. J.J. Loughlin was secretary and treasurer. WILM.DISP, 12-16-1913.

 

March – November, 1913
Real Estate Transfers:

  • S. J. Ellis and wife to D. R. Foster, trustee, for $10 and other considerations, two lots at Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 3-12-1913.
  • New Hanover Transit Company to M. W. Johnson, for $350, Lot 9 in Block 1, northern section of Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 3-20-1913.
  • New Hanover Trust Co. sold to E. N. Walton, for $100 and other considerations, a lot at Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 6-9-1913.
  • The New Hanover Transit Company to J. R. Mercer, of Hallsville, N. C., for $100 and other considerations, Lot 2 in Block 12, Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 7-11-1913.
  • The New Hanover Transit Company to S. Abramowitz, for $100 and other considerations, Lot 4 in Block 29, Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 7-13-1913.
  • D.R. Foster, trustee, to B. May and wife, for $50 and other considerations, lot at Carolina Beach, ‘located between the original hotel and the ladies‘ cottage.’ WILM.STAR, 7-23-1913.
  • The New Hanover Transit Company to Laura A. Mercer, of Hallsville, N. C. , for $100 and other considerations, Lot 4 in Block 8, Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 9-11-1913.
  • New Hanover Transit Company to A. W. Middleton, for $100 and other considerations, a lot at Carolina Beach. WILM.DISP, 9-13-1913.
  • The New Hanover Transit Company to A. W. Middleton, for $100 and other considerations, Lot 9 in Block 4, Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 9-14-1913.
  • New Hanover Transit Company to Percy R. Smith, for $100 and other considerations, Lot 4 in Block 4, Carolina Beach. WILM.STAR, 9-30-1913.
  • The New Hanover Transit Company sold to J. L. Lewis, for $100 and other considerations, a lot at Carolina Beach. WILM.DISP, 11-24-1913.

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994


 

News Articles – 1914

Federal Point, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and Fort Fisher
– from the Wilmington Star, Wilmington News, Wilmington Post, Wilmington Dispatch, Wilmington Messenger

 

January 21, 1914
It was learned that the new Belfast Land company, recently chartered under the laws of North Carolina, planned to develop Myrtle Grove Beach, located 1 1⁄4 miles from Carolina Beach, as a resort for the colored people. [the future Seabreeze]  (Star, 1-22-1914)

 

January 22, 1914
The purpose of the Belfast Land company, recently chartered by the N. C. Secretary of State in Raleigh, was to develop 200 or more small vineyards in the vicinity of Carolina Beach pier. Each was to contain five acres. One hundred vines would be planted in each acre, and it was hoped that they would obtain their full growth within five years when the grapes could be gathered. Dr. S. R. Maxwell was president of the company and Mr. W. B. Herring was secretary and treasurer. (Dispatch, 1-22-1914)

 

February 28, 1914
In an effort to get the government to appropriate $5,000. in dredging the Cape Fear River in front of Carolina Beach pier, Brooke G. Empie, representing Capt. J.W. Harper, owner and master of the steamer WILMINGTON, and others, had been in Washington during the week discussing the matter with the North Carolina delegation in Congress. He talked with Senator Simmons and Congressman Godwin.

The government spent $1,000. on the work two years ago but the tides had operated to fill up the channel so that it was necessary to have it dredged again. It would require from 30 to 60 days to do the work. (Star, 2-29-1914)

 

February 28, 1914
An attorney was in Washington, D. C. representing Capt. John W. Harper and others, in an effort to get the government to appropriate $5,000 in dredging the Cape Fear River in front of the Carolina Beach pier. It was very desirable to have a wider and deeper channel at this point as this was the only landing on the east side of the river between Wilmington and Bald Head Island. There was considerable freight hauled to Carolina Beach during summer, making a landing place essential.

The government spent $1,000 on the work in 1912 but the tides have operated to fill up the channel so that dredging is needed again. It would require 30 to 60 days to do the work, and it was hoped that it would be done before the upcoming summer season. (Star, 2-28-1914)

 

April 1, 1914
Electricity was to be generated on Carolina Beach this coming season to furnish lights which would be used in illuminating the resort at night. The machinery was shipped down the river this morning to be installed. It was hoped to have the plant in operation within 30 days. (Dispatch, 4-1-1914)

 

May 1, 1914
Abe Ross, a black fisherman employed by W.H. Yopp, caught a 425-pound sturgeon in an ordinary river net at the Carolina Beach pier. The fish was 9 feet 4 inches long and the largest ever captured in the area, and so far as is known, the largest ever caught in North Carolina waters. (Dispatch, 5-2-1914)

 

May 2, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – A two-room frame dwelling recently erected by Messrs. G.H. and M.A. Currie, of Clarkton, in Federal Point Township, to replace one that was burned by an incendiary three months earlier, was torn down and removed to some point not yet revealed to the owners.

The tenant, Taylor Clifton, an aged white man, was missing and there was a suspicion that he had met with foul play. Mr. Clifton had lived in the house for two weeks earlier, having moved there from Clarkton, and he had relatives living in Wilmington. The house was completely dismantled with every vestige of lumber removed, and with it all the furniture and effects in the dwelling. The site of the house was between the river and the ocean about 1 1⁄2 miles south of the Carolina Beach pier. It had been completed only two weeks before its disappearance on the site of the burned dwelling. (Dispatch, 5-11-1914)

 

May 12, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – The vanished house on the Cape Fear River, near Carolina Beach pier, was found. Deputy Sheriff W.H. Kermon reported that he found the lumber of the dwelling that disappeared in the yard of Mr. T.H. Nelson.

Five men, Messrs. A.W. Pate, W.M. Pate, and T.H. Nelson, white, and Frank Murphy and Henry Farrow, colored, were arrested under a warrant charging that they had removed the house. Warrants were out for two other colored persons.

The old man who mysteriously disappeared about the time the house was torn to the ground was reported as having left Wilmington on a north-bound train. Why he left the house immediately preceding its demolition was still a question.

One of the owners admitted that there had been a controversy about the land upon which the dwelling was located between G.H. and M.A. Currie, of Clarkton and the Hanover Transit Company, of which Mr. A.W. Pate was president. (Dispatch, 5-12-1914)

 

May 13, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – Complaint in the case of Alexander W. Pate and Joseph J. Loughlin against Geroge H. Currie and his wife, Nell A. Currie, W.H. Kermon and H. Mack Godwin, was instituted in Superior Court.

It was an action for $10,000 alleged damages to land in federal Point Township which the plaintiffs claim have been in their absolute possession for over 30 years.

The land in controversy, Mr. Currie claimed was inherited by him. It was now a part of a large tract which Messrs. Pate & Loughlin, under the name of New Hanover Transit Comnpany, were developing in Federal Point Township.

The bringing of the suit by Messrs. Pate & Loughlin follows closely the indictment of Mr. Pate and six others on a charge of demolishing and removing a small two-room frame dwelling which was located on the land in dispute and occupied the site of another small building which had been burned about three months earlier. The building had been erected by the defendant Currie.

The plaintiffs allege that the defendant in the action did, with force and arms, on December 22nd, 1913, enter upon a portion of this tract at the southwestern part and trespassed upon land which had been in the possession on the plaintiffs for a long time and was at that time posted.

It is further averred that a shack was built without the knowledge of the plaintiffs and that the defendants did wrongfully place some person in charge of the building for the purpose of wrongfully taking possession of the land in question. A few days later the shack was burned and the plaintiffs aver that they are informed and believe that the fire occurred through the negligence of the agent of the defendant. The defendants repeatedly trespassed and entered upon the land after having been warned not to do so.

The complaint further sets out that the defendants had greatly damaged the property and had cut down trees. On or about April 29th, the defendants with a large force of men did build a barbed-wire fence along a portion of the lands in spite of a protest entered by Thomas E. Nelson, an agent of the plaintiffs.

A small house was built on the lands and this act had brought a cloud on the title to the land which had caused the plaintiffs great damage. The plaintiffs contended that the defendants had wrongfully, maliciously and willfully, with force and arms, attempted to wrest the possession of a portion of the said lands from the plaintiffs.

It was also set forth in the complaint that G.H. Currie and two servants or employees, W.H. Kermon and H. Mack Godwin, both of whom were armed with pistols and one with a black-jack, trespassed upon the land and that the latter two did, over protest of the agent of the plaintiffs, spend the night of May 10th upon the lands. The plaintiffs alleged that H. Mack Godwin did use threatening language to some of the plaintiffs or their agents. (Dispatch, 5-15-1914)

 

THE VANISHED HOUSE – Justice Bornemann rendered judgment in the cases in which Messrs. A.W. Pate, W.M. Pate, J.J. Loughlin and T.H. Nelson, and four negroes, Roscoe and Ellis Freeman and Frank Murphy were charged with demolishing a house in the possession of Messrs. G.H. and M.A. Currie, near Carolina Beach.

All the cases were dismissed with the exception of those against Messrs. Loughlin and Nelson, probable cause against whom was found. Three witnesses were examined, these being Mr. G.H. Currie, Deputy Sheriff Reynolds and William Highsmith, colored.  Henry Farrow, colored, in whose case the State took a nol pros in order to use him as a witness, furnished the most important evidence. He described the tearing away of the house and its being carted away.

Mr. Currie placed in evidence a deed to prove this title to the land upon which the house was built. Three hundred acres were involved. Deputy Sheriff Reynolds testified as to finding some articles identified as having been taken from the house in question in the possession of Mr. Nelson. (Dispatch, 5-20-1914)

 

May 20, 1914
On the anniversary of the signing of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence at Charlotte, the annual excursion of the Junior Order to Carolina Beach was held. The Junior Order started their day with patriotic services at St. James’ Episcopal Church, and they went to the church yard and decorated the grave of Cornelius Harnett, the Revolutionary War patriot, and there they read the Declaration of Independence. Following the exercises they boarded the steamer WILMINGTON for a cruise down the river to Carolina Beach. Music was provided by West’s Orchestra and many enjoyed dancing to the fine music. A short address was made to the group by Mr. John J. Blair. (Dispatch, 5-19-1914)

 

May 29, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – The charge of conspiracy against Taylor Clifton, the old white man who left the Currie house near Carolina Beach, and was accused of conspiring with the Hanover Transit Company to break the law, was arraigned before Magistrate Harriss. The case was continued when Messrs. J.J. Loughlin and T.H. Nelson will be tried on a like charge. (Dispatch, 5-29-1914)

 

June 2, 1914
THE VANISHED HOUSE – Two hundred dollars was Taylor Clifton’s price for decamping, according to evidence before the Recorder Judge in the case of J.J. Loughlin, Esq., and T.H. Nelson who were being tried for destroying a house near Carolina Beach. Clifton was now appearing against Nelson and Loughlin and his story served to clear some foggy points in the case.

He said that he was taken to the house by Mr. Currie, and instructed to stay there. On the following day, Mr. Loughlin came to him and asked him who he was and what he was doing there. Clifton said he told him that he was there for Mr. Currie and had instructions to keep trespassers off the property. Mr. Loughlin then told him that the property did not belong to Mr. Currie, and that he had best get off. Clifton then said that he did not see Mr. Loughlin again until several days later at Carolina Beach, when he informed Loughlin that he would not get off the land until he had heard from Mr. Currie. Nothing then occurred for several days. Clifton said he could not sleep at night, because of unusual noises around the house – men talking in low tones of voice, etc. He said he was frightened.

Ten days after he had arrived at the house he was approached by a man named Bryan, whom he said was employed by the Hanover Transit Company, of which Mr. Loughlin was an officer. Bryan asked him how much he wanted to get out. Clifton said that he replied that he would not leave for less than $200.

Bryan then replied that he would see what he could do, and left. He returned the next night and said that Clifton had a chance to get the $200 if he wanted it, whereupon the old man told him to bring it along.

Bryan arrived about daylight next morning, brought the $200, delivered it to Clifton, and received from Clifton $25 for his services. Clifton then left in an automobile that had been provided, came to Wilmington and then went to Virginia, where he spent a week and then returned to North Carolina, where he was arrested. The case was continue. (Dispatch, 6-2-1914)

 

June 8, 1914
A special trip will be made by the steamer WILMINGTON at a small rate of 10 cents for a round trip, in order that the people of Wilmington can get a first glimpse of a remodeled, made-over, renovated, beautified , extended, and greatly bettered Carolina Beach. A large number of improvements had been made at the beach and quite a few cottages were being built. (Dispatch, 5-28-1914)

 

June 13, 1914
Carolina Beach Notes:

  • A concert will be given in the pavilion at Carolina Beach on June 14th by Prof. Brown and his Victoria Orchestra. Popular medleys and selections from latest music will be rendered.
  • Mr. J.W. Blake had closed a $1,000 contract to install an up-to-date electric light plant and wire all buildings including the pavilion, which will be lit with decorative lights. He had already begun his work.
  • Mr. A.W. Pate had moved into his new cottage, which had just been completed by Mr. H.L. Smith, contractor, who was building four additional new cottages for the company and two new cottages for private individuals.
  • Mr. B. May had completed his cottage, and was to establish a branch store of his delicatessen business which had grown so popular with the Wilmington public. The tents used last year by Bailey’s camp were still at the beach and will be used this season. (Dispatch, 6-13-1914)

 

June 16, 1914
Mr. B. May, of the well known Wilmington delicatessen, stated that he would not open a branch of his store at Carolina Beach this season, but he probably would next summer. He had built a cottage at the resort, which was occupied this season by his family. (Dispatch, 6-16-1914)

 

June 21, 1914
A concert was given at Carolina Beach by Prof. W. R. H. Brown’s orchestra.
The program included:

ALL ABOARD FOR DIXIE; march, by Cobb & Gumble.
BLUE DANUBE; waltz, by Ivanovici.
OH YOU DRUMMER; a drum solo, by Hill.
NEW YORK, LONDON AND PARIS; selection, by Stern.
MUSIC MUSIC; march, by Kmoch.

Intermission

I AM CRYING JUST FOR YOU ; march, by Monaco.
THE FUTHRIST; waltz, by Burch.
TOO MUCH GINGER; one-step, by Daly.
TELL TATTLER’S TUNES; selection, by Toll Taylor.
FLOATING DOWN THE RIVER; march, by White & Loyd. (Dispatch, 6-20-1914)

 

June 25, 1914
The annual Police Excursion was underway. Mayor Parker Quince Moore and Councilman W. F. Jones were the speakers of the day. (Dispatch, 6-25-1914)

More than 1,000 visitors journeyed to Carolina Beach on the annual police excursion. There was a tug-of-war contest, with 15 men on either side, and it was won by Sgt. Grimsley’s team, which defeated Capt. Woolard’s aggregation. The lightweight 100-yard dash was won by J. O. Bullard; middleweight by M. C. Huggins, and heavyweight by S H. Fulford. A. D. Smith was the winner of the annual target short. (Dispatch, 6-26-1914)

 

July 5, 1914
Three concerts were given at the Carolina Beach pavilion. They were at 11 a.m., 4 p.m., and at 7 p.m. The music was provided by Prof. W.R.H. Brown’s Orchestra. The evening concert was made more enjoyable by the rendition of a vocal solo by Mr. Harold Pate at 7:30 p. m. (Dispatch, 7-4-1914)

 

July 17, 1914
Road superintendent Burnett reported that good progress was being made on grading the highway to Carolina Beach. The “big hill” which involved a large amount of excavating, had been graded and when the road is strawed for its remaining length, there will be a “straight line” for automobiles to the beach.  (Star, 7-17-1914)

 

August 5, 1914
The Street Department workers of Wilmington held their first annual outing to Carolina Beach. One of the main events at the beach will be a chase after a lean and lanky greased razorback hog. The first man to land safely on the hog and holds it will be awarded a prize. The Committee of Arrangements was composed of Messrs. J. W. Smith, chairman; Miles Carter, Oscar Croom, J. H. Williams, O. F. Boyette and J. H. Jones. (Star, 7-25-1914)

 

April – August, 1914
Real Estate Transfers

  • The New Hanover Transit Company to J.F. Somers, of Salisbury, N. C., for $100 and other considerations, Lot 13 in Block 47 Carolina Beach. (Dispatch, 4-29-1914)
  • New Hanover Transit Company to Carolina State Council of the Knights of Columbus, for $10 and other considerations, Lot 5, Carolina Beach. (Dispatch, 6-29-1914)
  • New Hanover Transit Company to Alice Wells, for $100 and other considerations, Lot No 2, Block 3, Carolina Beach. (Star, 7-19-1914)
  •  A.W. Pate and others to A.W. Pate, trustee, for $1 and other considerations, 100-foot right-of-way through Carolina Beach property. (Star, 8-12-1914)
  • New Hanover Transit Company to J. W. Blake and wife, for $100 and other considerations, Lot No. 1 in Block 46, Carolina Beach. (Star, 8-12-1914)
  • Right-of-way transfers to the Tidewater Power Company, and to Mr. A.W. Pate, trustee, for the Wilmington & Carolina Beach Railway Company. (Star, 8-12-1914)
  • Right-of-way deeds were also filed from Louis Goodman, T. H. Hall and wife, Joseph Harriss and wife and Wm. H. Batson to A.W. Pate, trustee, for the Wilmington & Carolina Beach Railway Company. (Star, 8-14-1914)
  • Edelweiss French Richards, and Elias Richards, of Virginia, to Irene McCall, of Florence, S. C., for $2,000, lot at Carolina Beach, known as the “French Cottage” lot. (Star, 8-15-1914)
  • Right-of-way deeds were filed conveying right of way from George Honnett and others, and A. M. McKoy and others, to A. W. Pate, trustee, for the Wilmington & Carolina Beach Railway Company. (Star, 8-18-1914)
  • J.N. Freeman and wife transfer to A.W. Pate, trustee, for the Wilmington & Carolina Beach Railway, for $1 and other considerations, a 100-foot right–of-way through their lands in Federal Point Township. (Star, 8-19-1914)
  • M.W. Johnson and wife to New Hanover Transit Company, for $385, Lot No. 9 in Block 1, Carolina Beach. (Star, 8-21-1914)
  • J.M. Newton and wife to J.C. Newton and G.F. Newton, for $10 and other considerations, tract in Federal Point township, on east side of Cape Fear River and Atlantic Ocean, containing about 500 acres. (Star, 8-25-1914)

 

Source:
Bill Reaves files: Federal Point/Carolina Beach/Kure Beach/Fort Fisher 1725-1994