Plaqued Buildings – Federal Point, NC

Structures that are more than fifty years old are eligible for a plaque. To apply for your property see the Guidelines and Application link at the end.

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Blair-Brady House

 

Blair-Brady House
1001 Carolina Beach Ave. North, Carolina Beach

The house was probably built and occupied in 1935 by Walter H. Blair who was mayor of Wilmington for 5 terms 1926-1937. He was the first town clerk of Carolina Beach and also served Postmaster at Carolina Beach for a time.

The property was the home of a series of Blair family members until 1954 when it was sold to A.C. Green, Sr. and his wife Aileen.  In July 1974 it was sold to Gladys and Edward Craft of Wrightsville Beach. In February 1973 Jocelyn and Harry Lockamy purchased the property.

 


 

Burnett Cottage
404 Carolina Beach Avenue North, Carolina Beach

 

The Lot was purchased (along with nine other lots) 1926 by John Henry Burnett.  Ownership was from the right-of-way on Carolina Beach Avenue North to the high-water mark of the Atlantic Ocean.

The house was built in 1936. It was rebuilt in 1955 after Hurricane Hazel. Heating and air conditioning were added in 1966. The porch and roof were remodeled in 1987. There was an alteration of windows in 1997.

Burnett Cottage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Carolina Beach Community Church (Now: New Hope Memorial Baptist Church)
Was at: 200 S. Lake Park Blvd. (Now at corner of Cape Fear Blvd. and 4th St.)

Carolina Beach Community Church

Called by many the “Mother Church” of Carolina Beach, Carolina Beach Community Church began in the private vacation home of Mrs. S. C. Ogburn of Winston-Salem, NC around 1930.  One of the few residents of Carolina Beach, Mrs. S. C. Ogburn, described as a good woman, began opening her house on Sundays for Sunday school.  First, friends and relatives attended Sunday school, and eventually, others of various denominations came together creating a need to expand.  This cause interested people to immediately join her in a cooperative effort to build a building for a Community Sunday school in that no one denomination was sufficiently strong enough to do this alone.

Although the exact date was not recorded, a lot was acquired on 4th and Cape Fear Boulevard and a shelter was erected.  Early growth here in Sunday school work was gradual, but consistent.  The structure was enlarged several times within the next few years as the Town’s growing population forced it.  By 1937 there was a feeling that a larger, more comprehensive, and adequate church program for the community was needed.

Around 1940 a church was built with ministers from many denominations holding services.  With such a great influx of people at the onset of World War II, a number of various denominations splintered off to form their own church to accommodate them.

The Carolina Beach Community Church was formally organized as a Baptist Church in 1942.  The church has continued to operate through the years and changed the name to Hope Memorial Church on September 5, 1990.


 

Carolina Beach Drug Store
140 Harper Ave., Carolina Beach (SE corner of N. Lake Park and Harper)

“Carolina Beach Drug Store was the central focal point in the community for citizens as well as tourists, with a soda fountain and snack bar to accompany the pharmacy and a rooming house upstairs.  Informal meetings over a cup of coffee or sandwich allowed citizens to catch up on the news or air their opinions.

The bus stopped there, you could pay your light bill, and even receive advice from the resident pharmacist.” “…The two-story stucco building, with a distinctive, castle like parapet around its roof, was much more than a drug store…for years it doubled as Carolina Beach’s bus station.

During World War II, a bus stopped daily to ferry local workers to the shipyard in Wilmington…Besides soft drinks, the drug store boasted a “complete and modern restaurant” with seafood and other entrees according to a 1948 Star-News advertisement. Star News Article 2/24/04 


  

Carolina Beach Elementary School
400 S. 4th St., Carolina Beach

Carolina Beach Elementary School

The Carolina Beach School is a one story Spanish style, wood frame, brick veneer structure, originally constructed in 1938, containing four (4) classrooms and an auditorium, with additions in 1943, 1953, 1975, 1987, and 1989 to add more classrooms, a cafetorium, 1 office, media center, and covered canopy.

Carolina Beach Elementary School

The building has a hip roof with asphalt shingles, and has a large playground area to the rear of the building.  Double-loaded corridor on the interior and the cafetorium has a stage.

The school is located in a neighborhood setting.

 

 

 

 


 

Colonel Burnett House

Colonel Burnett House
7413 Carolina Beach Rd., Wilmington

The land was bought in April 1893 from the Southerland family by Thomas Burnett.  At his death in 1935, the land was divided among his heirs.

In 1939 Colonel Charles Henry Burnett built the current structure as a family home.  It remained in the family until 1978.

 

 

 


 

Immaculate Conception Chapel

Immaculate Conception Chapel
806 St. Joseph St., Caroline Beach

The Immaculate Conception Chapel is owned by Michael and Kathie Winseck.  The building, erected circa 1939, is significant for its social history as well as the structure.

Marion L. Winner of Carolina Beach donated the property to Bishop Eugene J. McGuinness in 1938 to build a chapel.  The Winner family was the first Catholics to make their permanent residence in Carolina Beach.

The building still standing was a rectory and four room dwelling. Today the building was the Checkered Church gift shop until 2020.


 

Joy Lee Apartments
317 Carolina Beach Ave. N., Carolina Beach

Grover Lewis, a masonry construction worker, together with his family, moved to Carolina Beach from High Point, North Carolina in March, 1941.  Mr. Lewis went to work for the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company and moved his family into the Marianette Cottage on Carolina Beach Avenue, North.  When the lot next door was filled in by a storm in the fall of 1944, the Lewis’s decided to purchase it.  Mr. Lewis immediately began designing the Joy Lee Apartment Building.  Long shipyard hours made it necessary for Mr. Lewis to hire William Bordeaux to build the basic concrete block structure.

Joy Lee Apartments

After purchasing a hand operated cement block press, the Lewis family turned out two blocks at a time, approximately fifty per evening.  Named the Joy Lee Apartments after Mr. Lewis’s daughter, the completed duplex was rented to vacationers.  Each apartment consisted of a living room, a dining room, a kitchen with an ice box, 2 bedrooms, and a central hall.  Considered luxury units at the time, they came equipped with private porches and private baths with hot and cold running water.

After the war, Mr. Lewis returned to masonry construction work.  Mrs. Lewis ran a large rooming house as well as the Joy Lee Apartment Complex.  Due to popularity of the Apartments, the Annex was constructed in 1948.

The Joy Lee Apartment building and Annex are a unique combination of several popular architectural styles, including Mission Style, Art Deco, Art Moderne, as well as Prairie Style.  Over the years the family has modified the Apartment Building several times, including a major renovation in 1976 when spiral cement stairs to the upper sundeck, and an in-ground pool were added.


 

Kure Cottage
301 Atlantic Ave., Kure Beach

Kure Cottage

The Kure Cottage, located at 301 Atlantic Street, Kure Beach, is owned by Mr. Terrell Webster.  The building circa 1916, is significant for the social history of its owners as well as the structure.

The cottage was built by Lawrence C. Kure and was one of the first cottages to be built in the Kure Beach area.  Mr. Kure also built the first fishing pier in Kure Beach.  Lawrence Kure was the founder of Kure Beach.

 


 

Loughlin House
1 North Lake Park Blvd., Carolina Beach (Now Havana’s – NW corner of N. Lake Park and Harper.)

Loughlin House

This bungalow style residence was built by A. W. Pate, president of the New Hanover Transit Company.

Loughlin House

In addition to being president of the New Hanover Transit Company, Mr. Alexander W. Pate was also in the hotel business. He owned a hotel in Florence, SC, two in Augusta, Georgia, and decided to build one in Carolina Beach – the Greystone Inn.

A. W. Pate and his wife, Eleanor, owned the property from June 1916 until November 6, 1925.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Lewis-Lyerly House

Lewis-Lyerly House
208 S. 4th St., Carolina Beach

Cinderblock with stucco, single family dwelling built in 1945.

Similar to other structures built in this period, though very few remain.

 

 

 

 

 


 

McCabe-Lancaster House

McCabe – Lancaster Cottage
815 Carolina Beach Ave. N.

On June 20, 1935, Vista and Harry Lee McCabe purchased lots 8 and 18 in block 14 of Federal Point Township.  According to tax records, they built a home on lot 8 in 1940.  The next year they sold the property to William and Estelle Upchurch.

Over the next 14 years, the property changed hands seven times.   Luke and Jessie Lancaster bought it on April 2, 1955, and kept the property until their deaths in 1991 and 1992.  In January of 2003, the Lancaster heirs sold the property to Charles and Elaine Henson.

 


 

The Ocean Plaza

The Ocean Plaza
Was at 200 Carolina Beach Avenue N., Carolina Beach. (Now Hampton Inn & Suites Oceanfront)

The Ocean Plaza building, erected circa 1946, is significant for its Art Moderne style and dominant location in the center of the Carolina Beach Business District.  Two stories covered approximately 5,000 square feet with a third story covering approximately 1,000 square feet.  One front corner was rounded.  It was constructed with stucco over a double course of cement block.

Located at the north end of the Carolina Beach boardwalk, it served as an entertainment center for people living in the area, as well as tourists who came to the beach in the 1940’s.  Big bands played in the building when that form of entertainment was popular.  Celebrities such as Bill Grassick, Bo Diddly, Chubby Checker and others played there.  Known to the community as the birth place of the Shag dance and Beach Music.


 

Pfaff-Cohen Cottage

Pfaff-Cohen Cottage
212 Atlanta Ave., Carolina Beach

In the 1920s, when Claude Pfaff was working for the Realty Bond Real Estate Company, the firm often sent its salesmen on vacation to Carolina Beach so that they would come back and tell their customers how wonderful the beach was – and, hopefully, sell more lots at Carolina Beach.

Pfaff-Cohen Cottage

In the early 1930s, Claude built a cottage near Carolina Beach Lake as a birthday present for Atha, who named it “The Lullaby” for the choruses of frogs that sang around it at night.

Often during WWII, the Pfaff family ended up sharing the small cottage with a family of strangers. Because of the shortage of housing in the Wilmington area, property owners were required to rent out their houses in order to provide the families of the enlisted men due to ship out soon a week at the beach before they were separated. Only office space was exempt, so Atha designated one room an office.


 

 Price Cottage
405 N. Carolina Beach Ave.

Price Cottage

The cottage was built in 1939 by a local contractor of Wilmington, Mr. Hines (he also built a dining room table that remains in the cottage today.) It was built for Grover Cleveland Price and his wife Tessie Sutton Price for recreational purposes for fishing and family gatherings. Materials were shipped in by rail; the structure is totally wooden.

When the cottage was built, all the area was marshland. During the Civil War, there was a confederate gun battery, the Half Moon Battery, across the canal. During the dredging of the canal, lots of cannon balls were unearthed.

Price Cottage

During World War II, the cottage was rented for a couple of years by Hazel King who fed and housed workers from the shipyard in Wilmington. There were 23,000 shipyard workers, so they had to stay where they could. The apartment slept three shifts of ship builders at eight hour intervals. Therefore there was always someone sleeping there sharing the cost. The children of the house spent their time looking for German spies on the beach. There was a blackout with black shades on the windows because of German U-boats offshore.

After the war and the death of her husband Tessie ran the Arlington Inn (named after the name of the street she lived on in Rocky Mount, NC as a rooming house for income to raise her family.

The cottage has weathered all hurricanes including Hazel, which after Hazel the asbestos shingles were overlaid on top of the wood. Hurricane Diana did some damage that required repairs as well as Fran, but structurally it survived with roof repairs, porch and awning repairs. Hurricane Fran came over the berm and up three feet inside the apartment.


 

Sly-Walton House
500 Cape Fear Blvd. Carolina Beach

Sly-Walton House

Monty A. Sly built this house for his family in 1938.  Monty, his wife and his two daughters lived in the downstairs area of the house and he rented out the upstairs rooms during World War II to young wives whose husbands were in the service overseas.  Said to be the first brick house on Carolina Beach, the Dutch colonial style has a gambrel roof with flaring eaves.

At the death of Mr. Sly’s wife, Edith, he sold the house to his daughter Lois Walton.  Mr. Sly lived in the upstairs until his death in 1957.  It remained the home of Lois Walton until her death in 2013.

 

Guidelines and Application to Plaque a Structure – Federal Point, NC

(Updated on 11/14/2020)

Guidelines and Application to Plaque a Structure – Federal Point, NC

Under the Federal Point Historic Preservation Society (FPHPS) historic plaque program, any house, business, or other structure can be deemed eligible for an historic plaque if it meets certain criteria.  Anyone may submit an application for a structure or historic site to be considered.  Plaque applications are available at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Boulevard, Carolina Beach, NC.
Phone: 910-458-0502;  email info@Federal-Point-History.org.

Criteria

  • The structure or site must be located within the Federal Point area. The boundary of Federal Point is defined as the same as the township lines.
  • The structure or site must be greater than (50) years in age.
  • The age of the structure or site must be established through the use of official documents, such as deeds, tax record, or other records.

Research

The FPHPS does not do the original research for you.  The applicant is responsible for providing all of the supporting historic documentation, photographs, etc., along with the application form.  The FPHPS can, however, provide assistance in guiding the applicant in how to obtain materials, or in suggesting a research firm or individual that can obtain the documentation for you for a fee.

Cost

The cost of the wooden plaque is $100.00 must be submitted with the application.  All expenses incurred for obtaining copies of the verifying documentation such as deeds, tax records, photographs, etc., is the responsibility of the applicant.

Historic Plaque Guidelines and Checklist

FPHPS Plaque Application

 

November 2020 Newsletter

The History Center is OPEN

Hours:  Friday and Saturday

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

 

Monthly Programs Still on Hold

Since Governor Cooper has allowed museums in the state to open, we have decided to re-open on Fridays and Saturdays from 10 am to 4 pm. For the time being we will not be opening on Tuesdays. We are currently looking at a significant budget shortfall this coming year, due to being closed for six months, which cost us a good deal in donations and gift shop sales.

Unfortunately, monthly programs are still on hold and it doesn’t look like we will be able to hold our annual Christmas Potluck this year.  The space is just too small for gatherings of the kind we have had in the past.

We are looking into using Zoom at some point. If there is anyone with experience in producing video programs and making them available on Zoom and our Website, please let us know!  

 

President’s Message – November, 2020

By Elaine Henson

Mr. A.W. Pate and the Greystone Inn, Part II

In addition to being president of the New Hanover Transit Company, Mr. Alexander W. Pate was also in the hotel business. He owned a hotel in Florence, SC, two in Augusta, Georgia, and decided to build one in Carolina Beach. It would not only be for tourists, but also for the company’s salesmen.  He wanted them to have a grand place with a dining room to host prospective lot buyers.

In February of 1916, construction began on the Greystone Inn.  It was on Cape Fear Boulevard, 300 feet from the Atlantic Ocean with a large covered veranda in front. The exterior was blocks made of Carolina Beach sand with plastered walls and ceilings in the interior rooms. A 30×30 lobby had a large fireplace. The beautifully appointed dining room was also 30×30.

Behind the lobby and dining room was a two-story bedroom section with 30 rooms. Each room had all the modern conveniences including telephones, electric lights and steam heat.  In the summer, windows were opened to let in the cool ocean breezes.

By the 1930s, the Inn was managed by A.W. Pate’s son, Waddell Pate.  Just in time for the summer season of 1933, the Greystone opened a roof garden on the expansive flat roof over the front porch, lobby and dining room.

That summer Cliff Smith and his Ohioans were engaged to play at the Inn. The band consisted of 3 trumpets, 3 saxophones, a piano, brass horn, tuba, guitar and drums.  The Ohioans vocalist was Cliff Smith’s wife, Betty. Cliff and his band designed the roof garden like an outdoor nightclub.  They placed the bandstand on the part of the roof next to the two-story bedroom wing, the dance floor on the right and tables and chairs on the left.  There was a white lattice railing around the perimeter of the roof and they made it look like a garden with lots of potted palm trees and colorful tropical plants.

The food was light fare, mostly sandwiches with soft drinks, beer and sets ups for brown bagging*. The attraction was dancing under the stars to a live band near the ocean.  It was a huge success and by the next summer they had added a portable awning used to cover the roof garden on rainy nights. Eventually, the roof garden had a permanent roof of its own.

A June 20, 1935, article in the Wilmington News described the beach opening with the first dance of the season at the Greystone Inn with Bob Hubbard and His Philadelphians.  The Pavilion, which also had live bands and dancing nightly, had not yet opened.  The article reported on that night, 300 couples were turned away from the Greystone’s Roof Garden because they were full.

During the years of WWII, the Greystone was converted into a USO, serving the hundreds of servicemen who frequented the beach during the war years.

It continued to be a popular attraction into the 1940s and 50s. It had survived the devastating Boardwalk Fire of 1940, being just two buildings west of the Bame Hotel. The Bame burned to the ground along with two blocks of boardwalk buildings and businesses. But, in the wee hours of April 12, 1958, the Greystone became the victim of a fire of its own.

Waddell Pate had been at the beach supervising repairs and painting of the Inn for the upcoming summer season.  He left that Friday afternoon for his home in Augusta, Georgia, stopping over in Florence, South Carolina, for the night. Early the next morning, he got a call about smoke coming from the Greystone. Firemen from Carolina and Kure Beaches battled the fire from about 5am to 7:30 am, when they finally got it under control.  It was believed to have started in a closet where paint and solvents were stored.

Pate decided to have the remainder of the building torn down and planned to rebuild.  Instead, he opted to have a Greystone Motel on the top floor of the former Mrs. High’s Dining Room and Mack’s building that was just torn down last month (Oct. 2020).

After the demolition of the Greystone building during Oct. 2020, the site of the former Greystone building is currently (Nov. 2020) a vacant lot.

 

The Greystone Motel over the Mack’s Store and Mrs. High’s Dining Room on Cape Fear Boulevard c. 1950s

In those days you took a bottle of spirits in a brown bag to a restaurant and bought set ups, such as a glass of ice and a mixer and made your own drink at the table.  New Hanover County did not adopt ‘Liquor By the Drink’ until January, 1979.

 

Society Notes – Nov. 2020

By Darlene Bright, History Center Director

Fund Raiser!

Just in time for Christmas (or other gift giving occasions).  Help us raise funds by buying something everyone needs.   The Society gets $10.00 for every set of sheets sold. Samples are at the History Center.

Sale ends December 31, 2020!

www.CoZzzyComfy.com/online-store

 


In Memoriam

 Eddie Capel   1947-2020

It is with heavy hearts that we share the death of our dear treasurer, Eddie Capel.  We always looked forward to the treasurer’s reports filled with his wonderful sense of humor.  He loved our organization and served until the very last weeks of his life.

Eddie grew up in Apex, NC, but his parents had a house on Carolina Beach Avenue North since his growing up years and his family spent summers there. Eddie and his wife, Pam, replaced it with a new house in the 1990s and continued to spend summers at the beach with their children, Jason and Amanda. When Jason married, they added Jane and then grandson, Davis, to the family.  They became full time beach residents a few years ago when they sold their home in Durham and became active members of the FPHPS.  About two years ago, Eddie’s sister, Martha Breslin, built a house behind his facing Canal Drive.  She moved from Massachusetts making them neighbors at the beach where they spent their youth.

Eddie had lots of stories of his younger days on the beach and was a great resource of our history.  He will be sorely missed by his family and many friends.

You can read the obituary at www.andrewsmortuary.com/obituary/edwin-capel-jr


Longtime member, Earl Page, died on September 10, 2020.  Earl was living in Florida with his son and family.  We send condolences to his loved ones.


Recent Donors – Thank You so Much!

Byron and Judy Moore – Kure Beach, NC

Elaine B. Henson – Wilmington, NC

Dottie Minor, Johnson City, TN

Donald Hatch Jr. – Spring Grove, IL

Jennings & Amanda Nestor – Carolina Beach, NC

Griff Fountain – Winter Haven, FL

Fred & Margaret Crouch, Wilmington, NC


  •  The History Center had 41 visitors in October. The UDC used the center for their monthly meeting.