Jack Fryar Talks About Charles Towne, Early Colonial Settlement

Monday, August 19, 2019

7:30 PM

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, August 19, 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

It’s been a while since we hosted our long-time friend, Jack Fryar, who returns this month to tell us about Charles Town, an early colony established in 1664 on the Brunswick side of the Cape Fear River. He will also premiere his new book, Charles Town on the Cape Fear. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

Jack E. Fryar, Jr. is a life-long resident of southeastern North Carolina, born and raised in Wilmington. He has been a professional writer and publisher since 1994.

In 2000, Jack founded Dram Tree Books, a small publishing house whose titles tell the story of North Carolina and the Carolina coast. He has authored or edited twenty-three volumes of North Carolina and Cape Fear history, and is a frequent lecturer for historic groups in the region.

Jack is also the editor and publisher of a new digital magazine, Carolina Chronicles, covering the history of North and South Carolina. The free magazine can be accessed at www.carolinachroniclesmagazine.weebly.com.

His historical specialty is colonial North Carolina, particularly during the seventeenth century. Jack has served as a United States Marine, worked as a broadcaster, freelance magazine writer, sports announcer, and book designer. He holds a Master of Arts in History and another one in Teaching from the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He currently teaches History at E.A. Laney High School in Wilmington, N.C.

 

President’s Letter – August 2019

Kure Memorial Lutheran Church – Part IV

By Elaine Henson

Construction on the new church was rolling along at a very fast pace considering that all but one of the workers were volunteers. By early May of 1955, they had the roof on and had bricked the exterior.  In the photo below you can see the classroom building built in 1953 with a flat black roof.

Work on the interior progressed while the congregation continued to worship in the barracks church building. Over the altar in the back wall they installed the ruby red Belgium glass cross with Martin Luther’s coat of arms in the center.

They put up the elm wood paneling in the chancel and installed the elm pews, both of which remain to this day. You can see them in the photo on the right, from the dedication service which was held on  June 26, 1955.

NC Lutheran Synod President, Dr. F.L. Conrad, Lawrence Kure, Bill Williford and Pastor Johnson laid the cornerstone before worshipers went inside for the service.  Several memorial gifts were dedicated and Boy Scout Bobby Ford was given the God and Country award for his work helping to get the church ready.

It was a wonderful day for the congregation as they celebrated with dinner on the grounds after the Dedication Service. Due to their fund raising, donations and the volunteer work force, they also celebrated that Kure Lutheran’s new building opened debt free.

 

 

 

 

Next month:

Kure Memorial Lutheran Church, Part V

 

 

Podcasts of Note

By Rebecca Taylor

What’s a podcast?  Basically, it’s a radio show that you listen to through an “app” on your phone, or you can just call them up on your computer. It’s taken me awhile to get into them but with nothing I want to watch on TV or listen to on the radio in my car, I’ve begun to explore what’s out there. Here are a few of my current favorites.

Cape Fear Unearthed
https://omny.fm/shows/cape-fear-unearthed/playlists/podcast

Created and narrated by Hunter Ingram, of the Star-News, “Cape Fear Unearthed” is now in its 2nd year of presenting curious, unusual, and often mysterious events in our local history. With each episode Hunter presents a historical event and then follows each story with an interview with a local historian about what is the REAL history.

Among the topics he’s covered are well known stories like the Maco Light, the Fort Fisher Hermit and The Lumina. Other topics were new stories to me including: The Suicide Club, Trouble the Wrightsville Beach whale, and the Ghosts of Gallows Hill. Among his commentators are Chris Fonvielle, Beverley Tetterton, Jan Davidson, Jim McKee, Eric Kozen, and Madeline Flagler.

And if you’d like a little preview of this month’s program be sure to listen to “The Downfall of Charles Town” that includes an interview with Jack Fryar. https://omny.fm/shows/cape-fear-unearthed/the-short-life-of-charles-town?in_playlist=cape-fear-unearthed!podcast

 

Stuff You Missed in History Class https://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts

With hundreds of episodes of little known or misunderstood events and people in history, this weekly podcast covers an amazing variety of periods and cultures around the world. Among my favorites: “Fearless, Feisty and Unflagging: The Women of Gettysburg,” “Lakshmi Bai — Who is India’s Joan of Arc?,” and, “Laura Bridgman’s Education.”

Locals will be especially interested in the two part “The Wilmington Coup of 1898: https://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts/wilmington-coup-part-one.htm. And, if you were at our program last month you may remember the mention of the Port Chicago disaster. This episode from July 2019 fills in a lot of questions: https://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts/the-port-chicago-disaster.htm

 

History Chicks  http://thehistorychicks.com/

My favorite, and I think the most carefully and thoroughly researched, is History Chicks which focuses on sometimes famous but often misunderstood women throughout history. With over 100 episodes, it’s hard to choose which are my favorites, but they include an amazing scope of fascinating women including, Harriett Tubman, Audrey Hepburn, Anne Frank, Ida B. Wells, Eleanore of Aquitaine, Lizzie Borden, Beatrix Potter, Agatha Christie, Clara Barton, Jackie Kennedy, and Coco Chanel.  Who knew?

 

Port Chicago Disaster

Mentioned in the program on MOTSU last Month:

“An ammunition ship explodes in the Port Chicago disaster”

(from History.com, the web site of the History Channel)

An ammunition ship exploded while being loaded in Port Chicago, California, killing 332 people in 1944. The United States’ World War II military campaign in the Pacific was in full swing at the time. Poor procedures and lack of training led to the disaster.

Port Chicago, about 30 miles north of San Francisco, was developed into a munitions facility when the Naval Ammunition Depot at Mare Island, California, could not fully supply the war effort. By the summer of 1944, expansion of the Port Chicago facility allowed for loading two ships at once around the clock.

The Navy units assigned to the dangerous loading operations were generally segregated African-American units. For the most part, these men had not been trained in handling munitions. Additionally, safety standards were forgotten in the rush to keep up frenetic loading schedules.

On the evening of July 17, the SS Quinault Victory and SS E. A. Bryan, two merchant ships, were being loaded. The holds were being packed with 4,600 tons of explosives–bombs, depth charges and ammunition. Another 400 tons of explosives were nearby on rail cars.

Approximately 320 workers were on or near the pier when, at 10:18 p.m., a series of massive explosions over several seconds destroyed everything and everyone in the vicinity. The blasts were felt as far away as Nevada and the resulting damage extended as far as San Francisco. Every building in Port Chicago was damaged and people were literally knocked off their feet. Smoke and fire extended nearly two miles into the air. The pilot of a plane flying at 9,000 feet in the area claimed that metal chunks from the explosion flew past him.

Nearly two-thirds of the people killed at Port Chicago were African-American enlisted men in the Navy—15 percent of all African-Americans killed during World War II. The surviving men in these units, who helped put out the fires and saw the horrors firsthand, were quickly reassigned to Mare Island.

Less than a month later, when ordered to load more munitions, but still having received no training, 258 African-American sailors refused to carry out the orders. Two hundred and eight of them were then sentenced to bad conduct discharges and pay forfeiture. The remaining 50 men were put on trial for general court martial. They were sentenced to between 8 and 15 years of hard labor, though two years later all were given clemency. A 1994 review of the trials revealed race played a large factor in the harsh sentences. In December 1999, President Clinton pardoned Freddie Meeks, one of only three of the 50 convicted sailors known to be alive at the time.

The Port Chicago disaster eventually led to the implementation of far safer procedures for loading ammunition. In addition, greater emphasis was put on proper training in explosives handling and the munitions themselves were altered for greater safety. There is now a national memorial to the victims at the site.

 

 

Society Notes

By Darlene Bright, History Center Director

 

We’re doing it again this Summer!

Guided Tour

Historic Carolina Beach Boardwalk

10 am every Tuesday!

June 18, 2019 – September 3, 2019

 50 minutes walking tour

 

 

ELECTIONS!

Elected at the July Meeting  for the 2019-2020 Year.

President — Elaine Henson

Vice President — Lauren Gibbs

Secretary — vacant,

Treasurer-Eddie Capel.

Board Members for 2019-2021 – John Moseley, Byron Moore, Brenda Coffey, Jay Winner.

  

  • The History Center recorded 93 visitors in June. There were 71 people at the July meeting!
  • The History Center was used by the Got-Em-On Live Bait Club.
  • Welcome to new members James and Dianne Braswell of Carolina Beach, Jeffrey and Kathleen Bockert of Kinston, and new business member Bullard Realty of Carolina Beach.
  • Thanks to Jim Kohler for helping with the July Newsletter.
  • Thanks to Juanita Winner and Barbara Smith for providing refreshments for the July Meeting.

Plaque Program

Our Plaque program is back on track and we’re receiving almost one application a month! We want to especially thank Ned Barnes and his staff for volunteering to do the title searches on the properties.  This makes the approval of an application much easier on the property owner and on our review committee.

Ned is a longtime business member and supporter of the Society.  If you see Ned, be sure to give him a big thank you for all his support and we highly recommend him for any legal needs you may have.  He’s right on the island at Pleasure Island Plaza, 1009 Lake Park Boulevard, North or call at 910-458-4466.  Thanks again, Ned!