Howard Hewett’s Legacy

from James Hewett:
“My cousin Howard Hewett passed away Monday Oct 6th in Vermont. His funeral will be Saturday in Texas.”

Howard Hewett

Between 2014 and 2015 from his home in Jones Creek, TX, Howard actively wrote many articles for the Federal Point History Center recalling his childhood years living just outside the gates to Fort Fisher.

Howard was a great writer with the amazing ability to recall details from his younger years on Federal Point.

Howard last visited Carolina and Kure Beach in November, 2015 and was the guest speaker at the Federal Point History Center.

Share some of Howard’s memories of Federal Point here.

October Meeting – North Carolina’s War of 1812

Monday, October 16, 2017
7:30 PM

The Federal Point Historic Preservation Society will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, October 16, 7:30 pm at the Federal Point History Center, 1121-A North Lake Park Blvd., adjacent to Carolina Beach Town Hall.

Our program this month will be presented by Andrew Duppstadt, Program Development and Training Officer, Historic Weapons Program Coordinator, North Carolina Division of State Historic Sites, North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

North Carolina’s War of 1812 Personalities explores the lives of five native North Carolinians who contributed in some significant way to the country’s efforts during the War of 1812.

Otway Burns

Those individuals are Benjamin Forsyth, Dolley Payne Madison, Otway Burns, Johnston Blakeley, and Nathaniel Macon. Some are better known than others, but each made some contribution to the nation’s efforts during that time period, and in some cases beyond.

This presentation gives a brief overview of each.

Benjamin Forsyth

Dolley Madison

Johnston Blakeley

 

Nathaniel Macon

 

From the President – October, 2017

By Elaine Henson

This month we are continuing to look at some of the empty lots on the boardwalk where the summer rides are located.

The lot between the Gazebo and the Marriott Hotel was the site of three Bame Hotel buildings built by James Rowan Bame and his wife, Mandy, from Barber, North Carolina.

The first Bame opened on the site in June, 1930.  It was three stories with a white wooden exterior and contained “33 rooms with running water, tubs and showers” according to a 1930s brochure.  Bame’s Hotel faced Cape Fear Boulevard near the wooden boardwalk and included a café with “Miss Mandy” in charge of the cooking. The rates were $1.50 to $2.50 per day or $10.00 to $15.00 a week based on the European Plan which did not include meals.

By 1935, “Mr. Jim” decided to enlarge and remodel his hotel with a brick exterior and including a large paneled dining room and a grill which faced the boardwalk.  The 60 rooms had a single bed or double bed with or without a private bath.

But it was not to last.  On the night of September 19, 1940, a fire began in the old pavilion and swept away two blocks of the boardwalk including the Bame Hotel reducing it to rubble.  Mr. Jim and the other business owners vowed to rebuild in time for the summer of 1941 and they did.  The fact that they were able to restore two entire blocks from ashes in just a few months earned Carolina Beach the nickname “The South’s Miracle Beach”.

The new brick three story Hotel Bame had 80 rooms, 65 with a private bath.  The floors on the first level were tile with hardwoods on the second and third floors. Red leather chairs graced the spacious lobby.

The new Bame also had an elevator, sizable dining room facing Cape Fear Boulevard, another grill on the boardwalk and optional air conditioning window units in the rooms.  It later included a pool room and a barber shop.

J.R. Bame died in 1959 with his son, George, continuing to manage the hotel until his death in 1968.  The family leased it for a few years before selling it to investors from Myrtle Beach in the early 1970s, who tore it down and built a water slide in its place.

 

North Carolina and the War of 1812

    From the website: http://www.carolana.com

In the early nineteenth century, North Carolinians were quite aware of England’s continued, friendly relations with the Indians on the frontier. Outposts in Canada stocked guns and ammunition with which they supplied the various Indian nations.

England’s provocation of the young nation of the United States of America increased markedly between 1793 and 1812, when England and France were at war. Both nations disregarded the rights of neutrals and stopped American ships on the high seas in search of their own nationals who might be evading military service.

In 1807, a British ship fired on an American ship, boarded it, and removed four sailors, three of who were American. Attempts to negotiate these differences with England failed, but in time France stopped this practice. The Embargo Act of 1807, stopping all but coastal trade, harmed the United States more than it did England or France, and it was repealed two years later. Subsequently, a non-intercourse Act prohibited trade with the offending nations, but it was generally ineffective. President James Madison finally recommended that preparations be made for war.

The War of 1812 had little effect on North Carolina except that people were divided in their support. Many said that the United States had withstood the insults of both England and France for years, and that no new incidences had occurred. Others agreed that the freedom of the seas should be defended. Some of the state’s congressmen supported President Madison, while others rejected his call for assistance. Recruiting teams found men eager to serve and the state contributed several important heroes to the war.

Within the State of North Carolina, there were only two minor skirmishes between the British and locals. For five days, July 12-16, 1813, the British landed troops and occupied the small towns of Okracoke in Hyde County and Portsmouth in Carteret County – both on the barrier island of the outer banks.

President Madison’s wife, Dolley Payne Madison, was a native of North Carolina. In Washington, DC, as the British were entering the city from the opposite direction, she delayed her departure from the Executive Mansion long enough to collect the presidential silver and executive papers, and to cut a portrait of George Washington from its frame. She tossed these into the foot of the carriage in which she and the president escaped before the British burned the residence. Later, the blackened walls were painted white and the mansion became known as the White House.

Benjamin Forsyth of Stokes County was a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army in 1814, when he distinguished himself along the northern border. He was killed at Odelltown in Canada and, like Brigadier General Francis Nash of the Revolutionary War, he came to be regarded as a hero. The State presented a handsome sword to his eight-year-old son and awarded him $250 a year for seven years. A county was named after him in 1849.

Otway Burns of Onslow County was a ship captain and a shipbuilder. During the War of 1812, as a licensed privateer operating up and down the Atlantic Coast, he brought in large quantities of supplies useful to the war effort.

Captain Johnston Blakely lived in Wilmington and in Pittsboro; after attending the University of North Carolina, he began a naval career.

As the commander of several warships, he sailed boldly around England capturing and destroying  British  shipping efforts. On the last occasion, after seizing a valuable cargo and placing a prize crew aboard to take it to America, he sailed east. Soon, smoke was seen on the horizon but the fate of Captain Blakely and his ship was never determined. The North Carolina General Assembly gave his young daughter a handsome silver tea service and provided funds for her education.

Another native hero was General Andrew Jackson, a native of the Waxhaw region along the North Carolina-South Carolina border. He read law in Salisbury and was licensed to practice in the State, living in Greensboro for a time before moving west to Tennessee.

In the War of 1812, he became the hero of the Battle of New Orleans, where he won a great victory with few American losses. Because of the long time it took for messages to cross the Atlantic Ocean, this battle was fought after the terms of peace had been agreed upon.

The War of 1812, which lasted more than three years, settled almost nothing. The British no longer stopped American ships on the high seas, but neither Canada nor Florida was seized by the United States as many people had expected.

On the other hand, General Jackson’s campaign in the South shattered England’s standing among the Indians and opened large tracts of land in Georgia and Alabama to white settlement. This fact alone probably had the greatest subsequent impact on the State of North Carolina as a consequence of the War of 1812, because immediately, thereafter, the State saw mass emigrations to the newly-opened “free” lands in the south and west, and these were to continue for many decades thereafter.

At the conclusion of the War of 1812, the Federal government initiated a new round of tariffs, beginning with the Tariff of 1816, which increased the price of British goods so that American goods could compete with them.

After the Revolutionary War, the Federal government operated financially primarily as a result of tariffs since at that time there was no income taxation. The Tariff of 1816 was officially enacted to protect American manufacturers, but once again it advanced the nation’s position towards protectionism and hurt the South more than it helped the North.

This new tariff, along with other miscalculations of the early Federal government, led to the Panic of 1819, which harmed the South even more and was another step in increasing the rift between Southern and Northern factions that began as soon as the nation was formed.

Society Notes – October, 2017

By Darlene Bright, History Center Director

  • Thanks to Cheri McNeill and Rebecca Taylor for providing refreshments at the October meeting.
  • Thanks to the people who worked the Island Day booth. Leslie Bright, Darlene Bright, Cheri McNeill, Judy Moore and Byron Moore.
  • The History Center recorded 69 visitors in October. We had 46 in attendance at the October meeting.
  • The History Center was used for meetings held by the Got-Em-On Live Bait Fishing Club and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
  • Welcome to new members Barbara Smith of Carolina Beach and Charles and Tammy Moye of Wilmington.